Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Tea (Wesleyan Poetry Series) Hardcover – February 15, 1998


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$55.00 $8.54
Paperback
"Please retry"

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Series: Wesleyan Poetry Series
  • Hardcover: 88 pages
  • Publisher: Wesleyan; 1st edition (February 15, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 081956334X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0819563347
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,467,572 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Kirkus Reviews

paper 0-8195-6335-8 Explaining in prose what your poetry isnt is not the best way to introduce a first volume, even if you rightly suspect that your work will be reduced to its surfaces as a series of elegies for victims of AIDS, which this is, but only in part. Over the course of his rough and rude debut, Powell develops beyond the unabashed homoerotic-confessionalism that provides the shock- value here (between scotts asshole and his mouth I could not say which I preferred). An anthropologist of gay rites and rituals, Powell captures the sweaty rhythms of disco culture in the '70s, borrowing key lines from his favorite Donna Summers songs to measure his life as hustler and high-risk behavior posterchild. Mixing camp and high art, the poet imagines Sal Mineos dying words, Robins lament over Batmans lust for him, and Walt Whitman as disco diva Diana Ross. Powells unique and sometimes compelling stylelines too long for a standard page width, erratic punctuation, fragments connected by colonsbegins to seem gimmicky with repetition. This ambitious debut would have benefitted from some formal promiscuity. -- Copyright ©1998, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

Review

"A fine debut . . . Powell's discoed-out flippancy and attuned formalism are like the kiss of life to that age-old pair of sleeping beauties, sex and death . . . the poems record a fractured existence, full of foreboding desire and disappearance." --Publishers Weekly

"Powell has done something genuinely striking: he has invented a new prosodic instrument and played it almost flawlessly . . . This is a brash, gutsy, entertaining and moving first book. Keep it on the living room table."--Lambda Book Report

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By M. H. Boroson on August 23, 2003
Format: Hardcover
By turns delightful and sad, D.A. Powell's _Tea_ is an ecstatic heartbreak, a celebration that takes place with the music of explosions all around. Powell fearlessly exposes his life and the deaths all around him, with inventive language and gorgeously nuanced rhythms. He raids pop culture for metaphors that are ridiculous and painfully beautiful, as in this passage elegizing his friend Nicholas: "you are/repeating the same episodes: nick at night." Who would have thought the endless reruns on Nickelodeon would yield such a stark and haunted metaphor?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 4, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Powell is bright, campy, sultry, somber, intelligent, and perceptive. His long lines reach into the grave and beyond it. He has the brashness and swish of a swashbuckler, the mournful tone of a nightingale, and some hot bedroom eyes seering the desolate landscape of a world ravaged by disease. How can he be so funny and so sad simultaneously? This book is a treasure for the next millenium.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 3, 1999
Format: Hardcover
What D. A. Powell has expressed in his book, Tea, is an anthem to the feelings and fears of every queer born in the sixties: that we have been both blessed and cheated for being who we are - at the time that we are - though often, distinguishing what is blessing and what is damnation is at the core of our struggle. His style is unique and challenging, as are our lives. And the mixture of tone is as complex as the various masks that we don: saint, sinner, perpetrator or innocent bystander. The range of expression is wide yet completely familiar. This book shall be a classroom text standard for the next generation who should want to understand the complexities of our collective experience.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By P. C. Scearce on November 1, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A good read. Glad to finally get my hands on a copy of this great collection or poems by D. A. Powell.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?