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Teach Them to Challenge Authority: Educating for Healthy Societies Hardcover – April 15, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-0826491381 ISBN-10: 0826491383 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic; 1 edition (April 15, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0826491383
  • ISBN-13: 978-0826491381
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 1 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,881,756 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The first intelligent book written about what the educational process has the capacity to accomplish.
Andrew Sigler, former CEO of Champion International and former member of the Board of Trustees of Dartmouth College


During a lifetime in higher education Gregory Prince has learned that exceptional universities in America and abroad refuse to be neutral about the great moral issues of their time. Students deserve and demand that their institutions be as brave as they are. Mr. Prince certainly is, as he cogently and courageously presents the case for colleges to be involved in their communities and their country. He takes us to Africa, Australia and Europe to provide inspiring examples of how students and educators can respect and motivate each other to improve their societies. You can't put this book down, and you won't.

—Paul Gambaccini, BBC Radio



Prince's message is of particular relevance in today's fractured and dangerous world....Education is a fundamental force in the historical evolution of civilization in its broadest sense, encompassing a plethora of cultures and societies. This book is essential reading for educators at university level and of great benefit to the general reader concerned with the role of education in our changing society.
—Iqbal Riza, former Chief of Staff to the Secretary-General of the United Nations


Amongst the many books on the rights and wrongs of higher education each year, occasionally one appears with the power to truly transform the landscape and all those who learn, labor, lead and live within it. Such is the book, Teach Them to Challenge Authority: Educating for Healthy Societies by Gregory Prince. He builds on a traditional foundation of liberal learning in educating for critical thinking and the spirit of inquiry, expanding its role to meet the challenges of the 21st century by advocating for important global issues, such as civil liberties - even when these impinge on controversial issues such as reproductive rights - and social justice....Gregory Prince shows the path ahead with clarity, elegance and with ideas and writing that will move anyone who reads this book.

— David K. Scott, Chancellor Emeritus, University of Massachusetts Amherst



DO NOT USE.
"So it's a curious, at times moody, book. There is wisdom here, thoroughly anecdotal as it may be. And it is valuable for its international outlook. But it lacks the self-reflection it claims to want to instill in students. And the sentimentality of its arguments for teaching students to challenge authority fails to address crucial ideological and philosophical questions about the nature of institutional authority itself. In the end, I think this book will reward reading, but not always for the reasons the author had in mind." —Canadian Association of University Teachers Bulletin
(Dennis Desroches, St. Thomas University)

Amongst the many books on the rights and wrongs of higher education each year, occasionally one appears with the power to truly transform the landscape and all those who learn, labor, lead and live within it. Such is the book, Teach Them to Challenge Authority: Educating for Healthy Societies by Gregory Prince. He builds on a traditional foundation of liberal learning in educating for critical thinking and the spirit of inquiry, expanding its role to meet the challenges of the 21st century by advocating for important global issues, such as civil liberties - even when these impinge on controversial issues such as reproductive rights - and social justice….Gregory Prince shows the path ahead with clarity, elegance and with ideas and writing that will move anyone who reads this book.

— David K. Scott, Chancellor Emeritus, University of Massachusetts Amherst



DO NOT USE.
"So it's a curious, at times moody, book. There is wisdom here, thoroughly anecdotal as it may be. And it is valuable for its international outlook. But it lacks the self-reflection it claims to want to instill in students. And the sentimentality of its arguments for teaching students to challenge authority fails to address crucial ideological and philosophical questions about the nature of institutional authority itself. In the end, I think this book will reward reading, but not always for the reasons the author had in mind." —Canadian Association of University Teachers Bulletin
(Sanford Lakoff)

About the Author

Gregory S. Prince Jr has just retired as President of Hampshire College.

More About the Author

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By ReaderinAmherst on April 28, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Gregory Prince served sixteen years as president of Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts. Hampshire is famous for its remarkably talented graduates--Ken Burns, Jon Krakauer, Liev Schreiber, Leah Hager Cohen among them--and for its remarkably progressive educational practices and politics. "Teach Them to Challenge Auhority" is part love letter to Hampshire's students and faculty, and although Prince describes each group with critical acumen, his affection is obvious. Similarly, he describes students, faculty, and administrators at emerging colleges, universities and technical institutes around the world, specifically in parts of the former Soviet Union and in Asia. From these vignettes Prince hammers on a single but powerful theme: classrooms should be places where argument is encouraged, controversy analyzed, and informed opinion expressed. He writes eloquently of the courage it takes in other parts of the world (mainly those countries still suffering with the remnants of their oppressively leftist political regimes) to fight to establish the kind of academic freedom we in this country at best take for granted and at worst abuse. And therein lies my criticism of "Teach Them": Prince's relentless optimism clouds his recognition of the kind of intimidation many US college and university students are subjected to on their campuses. And it's the worst kind of intimidation because it is subtle (offhand snide remarks; dismissive references to political opponents), presumptive (the "all intelligent people agree,-don't-they?" approach to framing debates in the classroom), and pervasive (check the Chronicle of Higher Education and other sources for the percentages of faculty who define their politics as very liberal or radical).Read more ›
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