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Teach Yourself Beginner's Latin (Teach Yourself Books) (Latin Edition) (Latin) Paperback – February, 1998

ISBN-13: 978-0844235653 ISBN-10: 0844235652 Edition: 2nd

11 New from $15.00 24 Used from $0.73 1 Collectible from $106.64
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Paperback, February, 1998
$15.00 $0.73
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Product Details

  • Series: Teach Yourself Books
  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: NTC/Contemporary Publishing Company; 2nd edition (February 1998)
  • Language: Latin
  • ISBN-10: 0844235652
  • ISBN-13: 978-0844235653
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #753,925 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

George Sharpley is author of the current edition of Teach Yourself Beginner's Latin and Director of MultiLingua language school in Bristol. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

This book offers and easy and fun way to learn the basics of Latin.
cjmarcos
The book, moreover, will give a real internal grasp of the rhythm and feel of the language.
Neeraj K Mathur
I reccommend this book highly for anyone interested in learning Latin.
K. Wallace

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 42 people found the following review helpful By K. Wallace on January 1, 2001
Format: Paperback
I am still working through this book, but so far I like it very much. The continuing story through which the reader learns new vocabulary is extremely amusing. It is worth noting that the vocabulary words are not conversational. (Although not many people have conversations in Latin.) For example, the first few words the reader learns are woods, mule, watches (verb), scared, and slow. Or something similar to that.
I bought the book with two audio tapes, which don't appear to be offered here. The tapes were the short stories being read.
One thing about this book that could be improved is the number of practice exercises. I could definitely have used more of them. Also, it would have been nice if the book had had more straightforward grammar explanations. For example, instead of giving examples of verb endings they could have come right out with a chart telling all the endings for the different categories of verbs. However, the grammar explanations were mostly very clear and easy to learn.
I had not taken any Latin classes before reading this book, and did not have difficulty understanding anything. I reccommend this book highly for anyone interested in learning Latin.
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47 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Neeraj K Mathur on March 11, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is a brilliant introduction to the Latin language. I first bought this when I was fourteen and worked my way through it, and I then followed it up with the textbook Wheelock's Latin: the two together got me admission to Oxford University's Latin and Greek program, into the same advanced stream as British students who had studied the language from childhood and had full A-levels (about an AP in the US) in Latin.
Sharpley's book works for two major points: 1) it provides a gradual exposition of grammatical concepts in a manner that is easy and straightforward to understand, and 2) it does so in a way that stresses that grammar is a natural part of language, and even languages that are 'dead' today were living and spoken at one point in time.
The book works by guiding the reader through a story which is set in a mediaeval monastery in Northern Europe. This does not, however, mean that the book teaches Mediaeval or Ecclesiastical Latin instead of Classical Latin; the forms used and taught are, in fact, the Classical ones that would have been familiar to Cicero and Vergil. (To be honest, the book really does not delve into areas sophisticated enough for the differences between Classical and Mediaeval versions of the language to be felt.) It introduces grammatical concepts a little at a time; there are few prohibitive complete verb or noun tables in the first sections of the book until the reader is able to develop a firm grasp on concepts of case, tense, and so on. Vocabulary is given in similarly small doses, and the language is presented in as accessable a way as possible. Every chapter also includes selections from 'real' Latin literature (with translations) that are not meant to be fully understood, but rather to be absorbed by the reader.
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97 of 104 people found the following review helpful By Melinda Gottesman on January 10, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent book which provides the reader with a very user-friendly approach to learning latin. Nota Bene, however that the book focuses on Medieval (ecclesiastical) Latin, not Classical Latin (although it does mention it occasionally)
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56 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Mia Soderquist (tuozine@bellatlantic.net) on April 20, 1998
Format: Paperback
This is one of the least painful introductions to Latin that I have seen. It doesn't assume any knowledge of grammar terms, and it doesn't dump whole declensions in your lap in the first lesson (unlike most of the other Latin textbooks lining my shelves). If you ever thought that Latin looked too frightening to tackle, this is probably the book you want.
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38 of 38 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 4, 2004
Format: Paperback
I must rave about this book. It does what many haughty titles in this category fail to do, and that is teach Latin clearly and effectively. So deftly does this book lubricate the brain to gently accept this grand language, that I hardly noticed how much it assisted me in learning OTHER languages completely unrelated to Latin. By describing grammar in terms of anticipation - i.e., that our brains anticipate language and whether what we hear makes sense is directly related to our process of anticipation - Sharpley breaks the mold for language teachers. How else to help an english speaker understand the many noun/verb/adjective tense agreements that are so common to world languages, but non-existent in english to any great extent. His pithy insight not only had me understanding Latin from the first pages, but also what to expect in my journey to learn Latin. There are no tricks, and there are no easy answers. However as teachers go, I agree with the vast majority or reviewers here who appreciate the sheer talent of the author to bring Latin to life, one bite at a time. I never felt like this language was difficult or complex, but that is was logical and quite understandable. You cannot go wrong with this book, and once the basics are under your belt (and this book offers more than basics with a quite extensive explanation of grammar and a hefty vocabulary) other books such as Wheelock's will be much easier to conquer.
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41 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on June 27, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is EXCELLENT! I was using Baumeister's "New Missal Latin", but found it to be rather dry (good for ecclesiastical latin vocabulary though). On the other hand, this book is very easy to read and I have made more progress on my latin in the last few days than I had made in the previous months of studying with other books! This book is very well laid out. The rules of sentence structure are given up front, the conjugations are taught in a common sense manner, and the reading exercises are great! Before you know it you'll be reading latin! I would have gladly given this book a higher rating, but five stars is the max you can give! I can't recommend this book highly enough!
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