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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on February 23, 2006
The other reviews for this are for the old edition and not the Brief Introduction to Education, so please be aware that the date of the reviews is before this text was published.

In reading the other reviews, it was obvious that the reviewers missed the point of the text--it is to be used in an introductory course, not in a course where preservice or practicing teachers would be designing lessons and units.

This text provides a great overview of the educational issues and problems that someone contemplating becoming a teacher needs to know about before investing time, energy, and money into obtaining certification. The brief version is much better, more up-to-date and student friendly than the original text by Sadker and Sadker.

For anyone contemplating being a teacher, the issues presented in this text may help you decide if you really have what it takes to be a classroom teacher. It gives an overview of the political, economic, and social issues facing educators as well as the historic perspective of American Education.

Well worth the cost.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on December 11, 2007
This book was used for my freshman Foundations of Education course. I found the book a joy to read, and it provided a balanced look at the teaching profession. This one book that will definantly not be sold back. The supplemental materials on the CD-ROM seemed to be high quality, but I disliked having to read them on my computer and ended up ignoring the CD.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on March 3, 2011
This is a Introduction to Education College textbook. Chapter 5 Reforming America's Schools (Schools as tools for Change) "To re-constructionists, society is broken, it needs to be fixed, and the school is the perfect tool for making the needed repair. To prepare students for such engagement, social democratic re-constructionists, believe that civic learning, educating students for democracy, needs to be on par with other subjects." A social action curriculum.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on October 5, 2010
This textbook is filled with the authors biased opinions and lacking anything of any real educational value. I don't like being taught from biased sources, whether they be liberal or conservative. Plenty of times I had to stop reading because I became so frustrated by the authors bigotry. I hope teachers will not use this for their class. I have not learned anything of value from this book about the subject I was taking, but I did learn to be on the lookout for people like Sadker who want to convey bigotry in a college setting. I really felt like I wasted my time and money, but fortunately I was able to sell the book back for close to what I paid for it. I can't believe this passes as a college textbook.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on April 4, 2011
This books claims that saying "good morning boys and girls" is on par with making a racist comment. This is simply ludicrous as are many of the assertions made in this book. This books represents why our education system is broken. There is less focus on education and much more on socialization of students.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on February 16, 2014
The right-wingers are right to criticize this book. But, just like they do with Obama, they're doing it for the wrong reasons.

The authors aren't racist because they bring up the issue of white privilege. If you really think our education system is a Marxist plot to enslave white people you should stop spending your days oiling your guns in your mom's basement and get out to have a talk with your kid's teachers.

The more dangerous bias in this book is something that most commentators don't mention, maybe because they support it. These authors are slavish, drooling cheerleaders for privatizing our public education system.

In Chapter 5 they let a rain of wet kisses fall all over groups like the Gates Foundation that are spearheading this privatization effort. They get all googly when they mention "making New Orleans a leading laboratory for charter school experiments." And you can almost hear their verbal ejaculation as they get all moist writing about Edison Schools or the fact that "Sylvan is piloting their centers at Wal-Mart so students can be tutored while parents cruise the aisles."

Charter schools are a failure. You can either be for them, or for public education, but not both. As a manual that is supposed to train people to be teachers, this book completely glosses over the many flaws of charter schools.

Almost 30 school districts have cancelled their contracts with Edison Schools because they were so poorly run. Most of these happened before the book was published in 2010, but the book makes no mention of this. Charter schools are used mainly to crush the power of teacher's unions, but any union perspective isn't even mentioned in this chapter. The authors only tack on brief sentences at the end of sections saying things like "some Edison employees reported that the company was hiding it's problems from the public" (a huge understatement) so they can weakly claim that they've addressed these criticisms.

In the ideal future that the authors seem to be imagining unlicensed paraprofessionals would be doing the teaching in charter schools for wages just slightly higher than para wages. First grade teachers would just drift around a classroom not actually teaching but monitoring a room of students all glued to their computer screens where they play "educational online games." These are some of the things I've witnessed firsthand by subbing in charter schools. As bad as public schools are, at least they can be held accountable by the school board. Charter schools aren't accountable to anyone except their shareholders, and even the shareholders aren't happy with them (just look up all the shareholder lawsuits against Edison Schools). But you wouldn't get any sense of this from reading this textbook.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 20, 2010
My college uses this for their introduction to education course. The book touches on the history of education in America, learning styles, multiple intelligences, g/t, special education, students' cultures, ESOL, laws pertaining to educators, reform movements, and so much more. 3 years later this book is always in my living room, car, or backpack. I have referred to it for EVERY education class as well as some content area classes. Well written with a story to open each chapter which is referred to throughout the chapter, tying together concepts. Useful inclusion of graphic organizers, one of the most comprehensive websites I've seen for a textbook. I would highly recommend this book for any college or university looking for a text for their first course in their education sequence, and as a supplement for any education student that did not feel their assigned text was useful.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 4, 2014
Pretty disappointed to see my textbook had to chapters(1 & 9) almost completely highlighted and underlined. At least 2-3 full sentences are highlighted in each paragraph. I expect any used book to have some underlining or highlighting done in them, but not this much. Did not see it mentioned in lisiting. Outside of the book is in great condition, and no ripped pages. I just prefer not to have to read threw green highlighter.
Not sure how I am going to be able to resale this book to a classmate or back to amazon.
Will not purchase from addled brain books again.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 20, 2014
Very informative of how the education system functions, the hardships that educators go through to hwlp the young to perform well academically in school and with their personal life. This textbook is useful for anyone that is considering in majoring in Education from whatever age.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on February 19, 2012
This book is quite interesting and informative. It was a good choice on behalf of the professor, but the price is steep for a college student. Over all good book for beginner teachers, I strongly recommended it.
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