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Teaching Community: A Pedagogy of Hope Paperback – August 27, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-0415968188 ISBN-10: 0415968186 Edition: 1st

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Teaching Community: A Pedagogy of Hope + Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom (Harvest in Translation) + Pedagogy of the Oppressed, 30th Anniversary Edition
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (August 27, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415968186
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415968188
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #51,726 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Readers of hooks's prolific body of work on feminism, racism, cultural politics, art and education will find much that is familiar here. Grounded in autobiography and storytelling and written for an intelligent lay audience, these essays exhort readers to keep up the struggle in difficult times. A distinguishing characteristic of hooks's work is the challenge to recognize, confront and overcome "white supremacist capitalist patriarchy," a recurring phrase that captures her hallmark theme: oppression occurs at the intersections of race, gender and the dominant economic system. This work updates her thinking with post-September 11 reflections on domination and hope, and contains refreshingly original thinking about spirituality, family values and even erotic relationships between professors and students. hooks, a self-defined "[l]eftist dissident feminist black intellectual," embodies the clash of 20th-century cultural politics. She writes candidly about her own racially segregated youth, her struggles to overcome discrimination in the academic workplace and her efforts to find common ground with white feminists. hooks's voice is unique in that she manages to balance a relentless critique of oppressive forces in society with the open invitation to participate in "beloved communities where there is no domination." Containing more inspiration than concrete strategies, the book may leave practicing teachers wanting more in the way of specifics about how to practice antiracist pedagogy, transform classrooms and bring about a just society. But the author's clear and consistent voice for progressive, democratic education adds an important dimension to society's thinking about shared values and the creation of a loving and fair community.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

Hooks brings passion and an updated perspective from her Teaching to Transgress (1994) to this challenging look at the failings of educational institutions and how we can bring hope and renewal to teaching. Drawing on her own experiences, she melds anecdote, autobiography, and critical analysis in an exploration of a range of issues, from educational standards to the unchallenged use of education in support of "capitalist patriarchy." For truly effective education, she advocates partnerships between students and teachers and the expansion of teaching beyond school settings to include community organizations and other more public arenas. Furthermore, noting the reluctance to discuss social injustices, hooks advocates teaching as an opportunity to confront racial and sexual biases, and to heighten consciousness of students across race, ethnicity, and sexual orientations. In a chapter on the attitudes of whites regarding racism, hooks demonstrates that true racial equality requires profound individual efforts to understand "the truth of our essential humanness." For readers interested in cultural criticism and educational issues, hooks offers her usual thought-provoking viewpoint. Vanessa Bush
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Bell Hooks is a cultural critic, feminist theorist, and writer. Celebrated as one of our nation's leading public intellectual by The Atlantic Monthly, as well as one of Utne Reader's 100 Visionaries Who Could Change Your Life, she is a charismatic speaker who divides her time among teaching, writing, and lecturing around the world. Previously a professor in the English departments at Yale University and Oberlin College, hooks is now a Distinguished Professor of English at City College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. She is the author of more than seventeen books, including All About Love: New Visions; Remembered Rapture: The Writer at Work; Wounds of Passion: A Writing Life; Bone Black: Memories of Girlhood; Killing Rage: Ending Racism; Art on My Mind: Visual Politics; and Breaking Bread: Insurgent Black Intellectual Life. She lives in New York City.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By S. Lyttle on November 14, 2009
Format: Paperback
As to be expected, bell hooks uses direct language to talk about the deficiencies in American culture. What I liked about this book is the hopefulness that is possible to change and be an agent of change. She calls it like it is, which can offend some people. This book is a very good read for anyone interested in creating social justice in education.
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19 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Pho BBQ on September 18, 2006
Format: Paperback
I read the previous review before I read the book. I actually agreed with his take before I read it, except "Teaching Community" starts out mostly about the "Teaching Community", meaning the struggles of being a professor.

I think you have to take her opinions with a grain of salt. She was obviously burned out when she wrote this (as you can tell from chapter 2). A lot of the harsh words she uses to describe the environment in America are later explained in later chapters. You see "white supremacist" referred to often, but find out later she also applies it to black people. She is very obviously frustrated about university administrators and the lack of respect her particular discipline receives. Sounds like a lot of professors I've had, especially those teaching non-science and/or psychology.

About the hypocrisy, she also states on page 29 that "In a culture of domination almost everyone engages in behaviors that contradict their beliefs and values." I do get his point though. I'm african american, but I thought some of her statements on race were painful to read. There were some very negative presumptions of others which I found to be gross assumptions although they may have been true in her experience. "Have you ever had a black woman speak to you for thirty minutes" seemed a strange request.

Yet, she is very intelligent and although I found this work to be a bit of personal and cathartic exercise for her it also provided many insights (though few solutions) on the student and teacher relationship. It also provided a few gems on serving others.

If you could see through her issues with men and I'm sure the white faculty at her university, there were many truths on race.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By GoMi on February 24, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book by Bell Hooks is absolutely fantastic! She is great at using her personal narratives to convey the mentality of U.S. higher education faculty in a manner that encourages one to pursue professorial teaching as a privilege and purposeful development of students first before anything. Great read for anyone who plans/attends a college university.
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Format: Paperback
Though I really, really like "Teaching to Transgress", I liked "Teaching Community." The book has all of the strong insights we expect from bell hooks, and even a few surprises. (I admit that I was not prepared for her chapter on sexual relationships between teachers and students.) Her books aren't for everybody, but for enlightened educators, they are wonderfully encouraging. This is a good book, but not as good as "Teaching to Transgress".
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
'“No one is born a racist. Everyone makes a choice. Many of us made the choice in childhood.”

-bell hooks, 2003, p. 53

Racism is an issue that permeates society, and, as much as teachers may wish to make them so, our classrooms are not immune to the effects of such a society. In her book Teaching Community, bell hooks tells us that “To build community requires vigilant awareness of the work we must continually do to undermine all the socialization that leads us to behave in ways that perpetuate domination” (2003, p. 36). It is not enough to create classrooms in which we seek to avoid dominance, but rather we must create spaces in which to actively counteract questions of bias as they situate themselves within our environments.'

read more at: [...]
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By Gabriela Fullon on February 28, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This came quickly and I'm very excited to use this for our staff trainings. The quality is perfect and I'm grateful I was able to get it.
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