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Teaching With the Tools Kids Really Use: Learning With Web and Mobile Technologies Paperback – February 3, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-1412972758 ISBN-10: 1412972752

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 152 pages
  • Publisher: Corwin (February 3, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1412972752
  • ISBN-13: 978-1412972758
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 7.1 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #252,766 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“I want to give this book to my principal and every person I talk to so we begin to change the way we think about using technology with kids. This book empowers teachers to engage IT specialists or administrators in a discussion about the use of mobile technologies or Web 2.0. The book gives the reader lots of information (ammunition) to go out and make things happen with their cell phone, laptop, MP3 player, or digital camera!” (April DeGennaro, Gifted Education Teacher 2009-09-10)

"Susan Brooks-Young sets out to prove that rather than being banished, technology should be fully embraced and placed at the heart of education." (Professionally Speaking, March 2011 2011-06-27)

"The book is written in very accessible language, clear and easy to read. This timely book presents readers with a plethora of ideas and strategies for implementing technology-based activities that will help students meet the standards and increase their awareness of technology tools currently available.” (Salika A. Lawrence, Assistant Professor 2009-09-10)

“This is a very well-written text with an abundance of terrific Web-based resources that educators can use to hunt for more information.” (Carol S. Holzberg, Director of Technology 2009-09-10)

"Susan Brooks-Young has once again provided a must-read book for educators. Each chapter is masterfully framed to provide practitioners, policy makers, thought-leaders, and anyone involved in 21st-century education with solid arguments, practical applications, and helpful resources. The decision-making and implementation model provided will assist anyone who is incorporating new technology into instruction.” (Ryan Imbriale, Principal 2009-09-22)

"Brooks-Young takes the flat world right into the classroom. She gives real-world examples of how any educator can help bring their classroom, school, or district to the forefront of emerging technologies. An extraordinary read for any educator." (Rowland Baker, Director 2009-09-22)

"Use of this books ideas and investigation of their impact on student learning has the potential to broaden the knowledge base concerning the implications for technology use on teaching and learning. Highly recommended." (Regina M. Mistretta 2011-10-17)

About the Author

Susan Brooks-Young has been involved in the field of instructional technology since 1979. She was one of the original technology users in the district where she taught and has continued to explore ways in which technology can be used to facilitate student learning. She has worked as computer mentor, technology trainer, and technology curriculum specialist.  Prior to establishing her own consulting firm, Susan was a teacher, site administrator, and technology specialist in a county office of education in a career that spanned more than 23 years. Since 1986, she has published articles and software reviews in a variety of education journals. She is also author of a number of books which focus on effective use of technology in schools. Susan works with educators internationally, focusing on practical technology-based strategies for personal productivity and effective technology implementation in classrooms. Two current areas of particular interest for Susan are mobile technology and BYOT programs.

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Customer Reviews

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I received the product in a timely manner.
Amanda Long
This book is a good guide for teachers wanting to bring in more technology into the classrooms.
R. Moubray
I really feel that this book is a great starting point for educators!
Kelly

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Paul A. Baker on December 20, 2010
Format: Paperback
Brooks-Young encourages school administrators, teachers, and support staff to consider the educational uses of the mobile technologies and Web 2.0 tools that students already use away from school. She speaks from experience as a prekindergarten through Grade 8 teacher, site administrator, and technology specialist, and has written for a variety of education journals. Each chapter in Teaching with the Tools provides basic information about an emerging technology or tool; offers strategies for classroom use; closes with a series of discussion points; and includes references to books, web sites, and online documents. I particularly appreciate Brooks-Young's well-thought-out decision-making and implementation model, which closes the book. This exercise walks educators through questions that apply when considering adopting any technology: What are the reasons for using this technology? What are the concerns about using this technology? How can we enhance or expand our ideas about using this technology? How can we address our concerns about using this technology? What questions must be answered before we pursue use of this technology?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By HGray on December 6, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
"[E]ducators...[N]eed to let go of doing business as usual and begin adapting to a changing world." Susan Brooks-Young's take on the current and future of education is well and simply put. The world is changing; the way we live and work and so should the way we approach education. This monograph provides the reader with some background information, suggestions for use and discussion, and consequences of integrating various tools that our students use on a daily basis. This book is a helpful stepping stone for the teacher interested in keeping up but unsure of where to start. If you are not familiar with the current technologies, you may find the brief descriptions in the beginning of the chapter very useful. If you are, you will probably skip over the section to the most helpful parts: how to use and how to bring up use of the technologies to administration as well as promote digital citizenship. As many schools are currently in the mind-set that these tools are more of a distraction than a blessing, you may find it helpful to read this book as support for your push to integrate the "tools kids really use."

I am giving this book a rating of four because I do believe that there is some very useful information. There are also a lot of reference links with more relevant information and specific examples that educators can use in the classroom. However, the descriptions in some of the chapters are vague and I found limited information in the text on integrating such tools in a mathematics classroom. If you are looking for a content-specific guide to the integration of technology, this is not the book for you. This book is geared towards teachers who do not have a starting point but are interested in what is available.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By R. Moubray on April 24, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Susan Brooks-Young takes what all universities as well as high schools are already realizing, kids are more tech savvy. She encourages teachers to research and find ways to incorporate technology to help teach kids. Kids are using technology every day like iPhones, iPads, mp3 players, etc. Why not use what they are already using and teach these kids how to learn using their everyday technology?

I agree that without incorporating more technology, including some of the technology kids are already using, can hinder a child's future. Brooks-Young encourages teachers and leaders to work more closely with IT specialist and bring in new programs and new technology that will give kids an advantage in their future adult careers or aspirations. She states that other countries are also recognizing this need and it would serve our kids best if we stay ahead of the trend. Brookes-Young points out that kids are never too young to learn technology.

This book is an easy read and opens the door to what is possible. Brooks-Young talks about recent trends and why she feels they would be good for a classroom. This book is a good guide for teachers wanting to bring in more technology into the classrooms. The book also goes through what can happen when new technology is incorporated as well as offering possible strategies and implements a structure of how to incorporate technology into the classroom. I think this book offers many discussion opportunities for schools and technology departments.
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16 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Phillip A. Towndrow on August 15, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is aimed at educators (school administrators, teachers and support staff) who are situated at the entry or early adoption levels of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) use in their schools and classrooms. The central premise of the material presented is easily stated: there is a range of mobile technologies and Web-based tools that have yet to gain widespread acceptance in mainstream education. But this proposition is little appreciated and often misrepresented and/or misunderstood. Fortunately, there is a technology-based revolution in teaching and learning just waiting for chances to occur and the author, Brooks-Young, positions herself on the frontier between ignorance, prejudice and enlightenment to play a part in bringing it about. The description of emerging technologies provided is well structured. Each of the substantive chapters features introductory/contextualizing and background remarks to selected hardware and tools, outlines of common objections and concerns relating to usage, numerous practical suggestions and discussion points.

This is an approachable book and discussion starter. However, in my opinion, there are two broad aspects of the overall exposition that impact negatively on the practicality and acceptability of the ideas expounded. These points relate to: (i) a highly questionable assumption in the introduction, and (ii) an underspecified statement of pedagogy throughout.

First, a central productivity-based building block in Brooks-Young's argument relates to the effects of globalisation. I nearly didn't get beyond page one when I read: "Students who live in industrialized nations around the world are increasingly disenchanted with the education programs provided.
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