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Teaching Yoga: Exploring the Teacher-Student Relationship Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Rodmell Press; Pap/Com edition (September 25, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1930485174
  • ISBN-13: 978-1930485174
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 7.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #20,583 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Donna Farhi has practiced Yoga for twenty-eight years and has taught internationally for over two decades. One of America's most respected and loved Yoga teachers, she travels throughout the world leading retreats and training others to teach. Farhi has been an Asana columnist for both Yoga Journal and Yoga International and is the author of the contemporary classics The Breathing Book and Yoga Mind, Body & Spirit. Born in America, she now resides in New Zealand.

Customer Reviews

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Unfortunately, I was really disappointed in this book.
Cycling Yogi
Teaching Yoga is one of those books that must be mandatory reading for anyone in the yoga field.
Claudia
This book is poorly written with so many pitiful autobiographic stories in it.
Diana Renison

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

82 of 83 people found the following review helpful By Theresa Reed on October 28, 2006
Format: Paperback
When I went through my own teacher training program, the subject of ethics were only briefly touched on. Although I consider myself an ethical person, I found that once I started teaching for real, there were times where I felt unsure of how to deal with my students or other various situations. How do I deal with a studio that is unethical? What do I do if a student acts in a manner that is inappropriate? How much should I charge? How do I handle a complaint from a student in a respectful manner? How do I set a healthy boundary?

"Teaching Yoga" by Donna Farhi attempts to answer these types of questions - and more. Farhi's book is thoughtful and well written. It is sprinkled throughout with verses from the Yoga Sutras as well as thought provoking "ethical inquires" that challenge the reader to explore their own feelings and ethics with various situations that other teachers have faced. Farhi covers every situation that you could think of: appropriate dress, foul language, when to send a student to another teacher, refunds, traning programs and more. I found myself recognizing situations that I have encountered and nodding in agreement with her solutions.

With the abundance of new yoga teachers and aspiring teachers hitting the market, there are bound to be many with questions and issues. Although the Yoga Alliance (an organization that has "standards" for teachers and schools) claims to "support the diversity and integrity of yoga", I have found this to be untrue. There are many teacher training programs and teachers that do not practice the yamas and the niyamas - and the Yoga Alliance does nothing at all to enforce these so called "codes of conduct".
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Cycling Yogi on December 31, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I LOVED Donna Farhi's book "Yoga Mind, Body and Spirit" (which should be required reading for all yoga professionals) and was hoping for another book just like it -- only this time focusing on how to be a better yoga instructor. Unfortunately, I was really disappointed in this book. Since this book is called "Teaching Yoga", I thought that it would be about TEACHING YOGA, not 150 pages on ethics. Perhaps a better and more truthful title would have been "The Ethics of Teaching Yoga." If you are looking for a book on yoga and ethics, then this is the book for you. However, if you are looking for a book on the process or the act of teaching yoga or ways of improving yourself as a yoga instructor, this is absolutely not the right book for you.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By L. Avery on September 9, 2007
Format: Paperback
I have been unable to put this book down after two years teaching there is a lot that Donna talks about in this book which I have faced without the guidance and professionalism that I found in this book. It is exceptionally helpful and has helped me really think about the nature of teaching Yoga and how this impacts on the students and the world around me.
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31 of 42 people found the following review helpful By yoga guy on March 19, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am in my sixties, married, a retired professor and aspiring yoga instructor. This book is gender biased, portraying an inaccurate and unfair vision of heterosexual yoga instructors. Donna Farhi describes the yoga community as a sick and sad cauldron of sexual abuse where male instructors "infantilize" female students and abuse them without love or mercy. The book denigrates both sexes; male instructors are evil predators "usually married" and women are, not evil, just stupid and weak, offering themselves up in droves to evil manipulating low-down dirty fast talking yoga instructors. The author seems oddly fixated on the touching of genitalia, mentioning it at least three times, and also seems oddly focused on the wearing of "inappropriate", "tight" male attire. She uses the book to blatantly "out" an accused transgressor by telling us on pg 21 the exact words the man uses to describe himself in his advertising. Unethical?. Mean? Yes, and possibly slanderous. Farhi even suggest that yoga teachers who engage in romantic relationships with students, no matter how willing or adult, be imprisoned. I believe this author has deep personal issues that have sullied her attitude toward the world of yoga and the good human beings who practice it. This book is primarily an enunciation of the authors personal code of ethics and has little or nothing to do with "Teaching Yoga".
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Joseph M. Yonek on December 21, 2011
Format: Paperback
Very disappointing required read for yoga teacher training. Donna preaches a lot and uses plenty of examples of people behaving badly, but at the same time assumes that the other people have no personal responsibility for what takes place around them.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Claudia on August 15, 2011
Format: Paperback
Teaching Yoga is one of those books that must be mandatory reading for anyone in the yoga field. Not just for teachers, but also students.

Donna Farhi presents information in a way that holds the reader responsible and puts our own internal process under the microscope. It challenges our assumptions, intentions and boundaries to the core, especially in part II, where things get down to business to a level I have not seen anywhere else.
In Part I she explores the relationship of Student and Teacher and goes over the projections that live on a student's mind. How the teacher can be 'created' in a student's mind universe as 'healer' 'priest' 'parent', even 'lover'.

All of these archetypes of perception can create some pitfalls for a teacher, and navigating the deep emotional waters of a transformative process like yoga presents colossal challenges. Donna addresses each one of them with simple examples that help clarify the issues.

In Part II she goes over Ethics: Among others, she has specific chapters on:
When to Send a Student to Another Teacher
Class Numbers
Adjustments and Touching
Power of Words
Boundaries
The Ethics of Money - One that I particularly liked
Refunds
Teacher Training
Pitfalls of Fame

How down-to-earth can you get? Her examples make me shiver sometimes, as in the case of a student who would interrupt the class constantly, make questions that seem more like a monologue rather than get to a point or add to the class material, and always arrive late.

Hm, makes me wonder if I ever rambled on questions or tried to be the focus of attention... I think I have, oh dear! guilty as charged.
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