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197 of 200 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant product
INTRODUCTION

My name is Al Massicotte (Alofbennington@yahoo.com). I'm a professional broad-spectrum product innovator. But like most who read Amazon reviews, I simply want to buy excellent products at affordable prices.

I bought two 3-packs of this 200-lumen flashlight (Techlite TE-105/200) from Costco four months ago. The regular price for a pack...
Published on May 25, 2012 by Al Massicotte

versus
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Flashlight is great
These flashlights work great and I really like them. I would love to leave a 5 star review, but when I opened the package only 2 of them worked. The metal ring on the bottom of the battery case is missing on one making it useless. I e-mailed the seller and customer service for the company requesting a battery pack/cage replacement only. I have gotten no response from...
Published on July 25, 2012 by CW - Crazy about books


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197 of 200 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant product, May 25, 2012
This review is from: Techlite Lumen Master 200 Lumens High-Intensity CREE XPG L.E.D. Tactical Flashlight, 3 Pack (Misc.)
INTRODUCTION

My name is Al Massicotte (Alofbennington@yahoo.com). I'm a professional broad-spectrum product innovator. But like most who read Amazon reviews, I simply want to buy excellent products at affordable prices.

I bought two 3-packs of this 200-lumen flashlight (Techlite TE-105/200) from Costco four months ago. The regular price for a pack was $20, but it was on sale for $16 ($5.33 per flashlight). And, of course, it comes with Costco's usual lifetime money-back guarantee.

Fortunately, my profession gave me access to test equipment that facilitated an in-depth study of this flashlight. And I am happy to share my findings with the Amazon community, whose vast library of reviews helped me evaluate hundreds of products.

OVERALL DESIGN AND MANUFACTURE

The flashlight has a very smart design. My compliments to the team that created this practical marvel. And it's manufactured with high precision from quality materials.

ILLUMINATION

The flashlight uses just 3 AAA batteries, yet is more illuminating than a traditional flashlight with 3 D batteries. I could barely believe my eyes. This little gadget will light up a big tree on a dark night from a hundred yards away!

Intensity and hue do not noticeably vary from sample to sample.

Reviewers of an earlier model (100-lumen) said an adjustable focus did not work properly. But the 200-lumen model has a fixed focus. Its ingeniously-shaped reflector concurrently delivers both an excellent spotlight (for intense illumination of the target) and an excellent floodlight (for ample peripheral illumination).

COMPACTNESS

Although the flashlight is compact, it fits one's hand comfortably and securely.

I had no hesitation replacing all of my flashlights, big and small, with this palm-sized floodlight. I love that it takes up so little room in my toolbox, glovebox, bedside drawer, kitchen drawer, laundry, and safe room.

In fact, it's even compact and light enough to carry in a pocket or purse. So it's much more likely to be brought along than left at home.

BATTERY RUN TIME TEST METHODOLOGY

I performed a series of tests to determine the run time of a set of batteries, depending on the choice of beam--HIGH, LOW or STROBE.

To assure that test results would not be influenced by differences between flashlight samples, I used the same flashlight throughout the series.

To assure that test results would not be influenced by variations in battery performance or condition, I began every test by loading the flashlight with fresh batteries from the same stock (package of Costco Kirkland alkaline AAA batteries).

I monitored the light output of the flashlight with a photometer (Sekonic L-246 outfitted with a white filter and 10X slide). I nested the head of the flashlight over the filter and took all readings from the meter's black scale. Although the readouts are in nonstandard units, they are in proportion to the volume of light generated by the flashlight. And in these tests that's what matters.

With fresh batteries a beam's brightness will be what I call "full-bright". As the batteries drain, brightness will gradually diminish. But it is presumed that most users will find a beam acceptable so long as its brilliance doesn't fall below "half-bright". Accordingly, "battery run time" is the amount of time a fresh battery pack can deliver a beam at half-bright or better.

It turns out that LOW has a full-bright reading of 100 on the scale; so it is half-bright at 50. HIGH has a full-bright reading of 300; so it is half-bright at 150. STROBE has a full-bright reading of 140; so it is half-bright at 70.

Normally, one would load a fresh set of batteries into a flashlight, then consume them over a period of many months in multiple sessions, each followed by a long rest. It turns out that these rest breaks enable batteries to recover, extending their run time. To approximate this operational scenario in a compressed time frame, each test was broken into a series of five sessions (S1 through S5), separated with rest.

I began each session by starting a count-up timer from zero. Then I selected the beam of interest. When the brilliance dropped to half-bright, I switched off the flashlight and noted the run time.

Each beam was tested in 10 steps: (1) Install fresh batteries. (2) S1. (3) One-hour rest. (4) S2. (5) One-hour rest. (6) S3. (7) One-hour rest. (8) S4. (9) One-day rest. (10) S5.

BATTERY RUN TIME TEST RESULTS

Battery run time on LOW = (226 minutes in S1) + (35 in S2) + (18 in S3) + (7 in S4) + (24 in S5) = 310 minutes. That is, LOW lasts only 3.8 hours in a first session, but 5.2 hours overall.

Battery run time on HIGH = (46 minutes in S1) + (24 in S2) + (4 in S3) + (2 in S4) + (4 in S5) = 80 minutes. That is, HIGH lasts only 0.8 hours in a first session, but 1.3 hours overall.

Battery run time on STROBE = (143 minutes in S1) + (17 in S2) + (21 in S3) + (6 in S4) + (13 in S5) = 200 minutes. That is, STROBE lasts only 2.4 hours in a first session, but 3.3 hours overall.

Reviewers of an earlier model (100-lumen) said an apparent electrical flaw was rapidly draining the battery pack, even when the flashlight was off. It was reported that the battery pack of a flashlight would drain dry in 1 to 6 months of storage. But that's history.

MODE SWITCH

The switch has 4 modes--LOW, HIGH, STROBE and OFF.

Switches found on traditional flashlights are solely mechanical and consume no power. But this flashlight's switch includes electronic circuitry, which consumes power continuously, even in the OFF mode. With fresh batteries, the battery pack drain rate is 260 mA on LOW, 1000 mA on HIGH, 440 mA on STROBE, and 0.010 mA on OFF. Accordingly, the drain rate is 100,000 times as much on HIGH as on OFF. So if the flashlight is stored unused for a year (8760 hours), the OFF loss will be the same as running the flashlight on HIGH for 8760h ÷ 100,000 = 0.0876h. That's only about 5 minutes (6% of initial overall capacity).

If the flashlight is accidently left on until its beam dies, it will turn off automatically. That will preserve the batteries, which are capable of partial recovery. But then it will no longer be possible to switch the flashlight back on until the following is done: (1) Allow the batteries to rest for an hour or so, if necessary. (2) Remove the cap momentarily, which resets the electronic switch. (3) After the cap is reinstalled, the flashlight will be ready for additional use.

The mode switch button does not protrude beyond its guard ring, so is not prone to accidental actuation. In fact, it must be depressed over 1/16" to activate.

BATTERY CAGE

Many reviewers of a previous model (100-lumen) said the battery cage was brittle and prone to break apart if the flashlight fell as little as half a foot. But the 200-lumen model has a rugged battery cage. I drop-tested one of my 200-lumen flashlights from a height of 4 feet to a sheet of 3/4" plywood that was lying on a concrete floor. I ran one drop with side impact, one with head impact and one with tail impact. Sadly, the plywood sustained considerable damage. But the integrity and performance of the flashlight and cage were unaffected. Finally, I ran the same series of drops with just the fully-loaded cage (no longer protected by the case). Although some batteries popped out upon impact, the cage incurred no apparent damage.

In the event of battery leakage, the cage is likely to prevent corrosive material from attacking the barrel and its electronic components, which are difficult to access for cleaning and burnishing. Whereas the cage is easy to remove, empty, and clean.

STROBE

One use for the strobe is as a locator. It can send a plea for help to people on the ground, on the water or in the air. Possible scenarios include vehicle breakdown, injury on a hike, and urgent need of rescue. I tested the nighttime reach of the strobe on a well-lit street in the suburbs. At a distance of 1300 feet the strobe was still very eye catching. I presume that a rescue pilot could easily spot the signal from a mile away.

A second use is as an emergency caution marker, as might be warranted in a road accident.

A third use is in self defense. The strobe can twart the approach of an attacker through disorientation and even temporary blindness.

If you are strobophobic, you don't have to pass sequentially from LOW to HIGH to STROBE in order to get to OFF. Just hold the button in for a couple seconds to leapfrog the intermediate modes.

SELF-DEFENSE STRIKE BEZEL

The head of the flashlight has a scalloped bezel. It enables the flashlight to be used to fend off an attack, such as by forcefully and repeatedly jabbing the attacker's face. And the handle's knurling provides an extreme grip, which should make it easy to keep this weapon under your control. Hopefully, the bad guy will run off and painfully regret his choice of victim.

The bezel provides an important additional benefit. When doing tabletop jobs, such as service work, the user may wish to leave the flashlight turned on until the task at hand is done. But the flashlight's barrel lacks reliable anti-roll provision, so would be prone to fall off the table. The good news is that this flashlight will rest very stably on its bezel. And the scallops let out enough light to remind one to turn off the power before going on break.

WATER RESISTANCE

I apply a dab of plumber's silicone grease to the flashlight's O-ring. This facilitates cap removal and replacement. And it should improve the water seal.

I lowered a flashlight sample into a pail of water. And while it was submerged, I cycled the switch through its four modes. Then I left the flashlight on LOW for one hour at a depth of one foot. The flashlight never skipped a beat. Not so much as a trace of water was able to pass its O-ring. So the interior of the case remained bone dry.

RELIABILITY

The power circuit of a traditional flashlight typically would become touchy as contact points (in the switch and battery compartment) became tarnished. Eventually, to get the flashlight to perform as expected it was necessary to turn the switch on and off several times, jar the flashlight repeatedly, or burnish all battery contact points.

In contrast, my hope is that Techlite's electronic switch will remain 100% dependable indefinitely.

Reviewers of an earlier model (100-lumen) complained that it would suddenly turn off, even though the battery pack still had most of its charge. That's the last thing one would appreciate in an emergency situation in the dark. This was likely due to bad electronics. The 200-lumen model does not have this problem. In fact, as the battery drains, the light intensity will gradually diminish all the way down to very dim.

DURABILITY

I've had absolutely no problems with my 6 units over the 4 months that I've owned them and used them repeatedly.

My impression is that this rugged tool will give a typical user consistently excellent performance for the rest of his life.

RATING

I apologize for having virtually nothing negative to say about this flashlight. But it's not my fault. Complain to Techlite.

I paid only $5.33 per flashlight. But if I ever need more of them, I won't hesitate to pay $20 per flashlight, if necessary. It would still be an excellent value!

U P D A T E #1 (Sep 7, 2012)

ANSI FL1

On the Techlite 200 three-pack, its manufacturer testifies that the flashlight was tested to ANSI FL1. This standard is one way to define nomenclature and methodology for measuring a flashlight's performance. I presume that tests on the Techlite were done directly by the manufacturer, as a third-party lab (not motivated to fudge) isn't referenced.

The test results are as follows:
1) Weather resistant
2) Impact resistant to a 1-meter fall
3) Peak intensity = 6000 candelas
4) High beam intensity = 200 lumens
5) Beam range = 150 meters
6) Run time on high beam = 1 hour
7) Run time on low beam = 4 hours

PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS (taken by me)

Length = 4.5"
Handle diameter (mounting diameter) = 1.11"
Head diameter (maximum diameter) = 1.43"
Weight (including batteries and strap) = 4.9 oz

RECOMMENDED MAINTENANCE (proposed by me)

Every 2 months: Move each flashlight one step through your array of flashlight storage locations--car to kitchen, kitchen to laundry, etc. This distributes the unusual demands of certain locations. For example, the car flashlight may be subjected to high temperatures, which degrade batteries rapidly. And the kitchen flashlight may be used heavily, while the laundry flashlight is barely used at all.

Every 12 months: Replace all batteries. This not only helps to assure great performance by all flashlights at all times (especially in an emergency), but it minimizes the chance that you will ever have to deal with electrolyte leakage.

STRATEGY FOR SHOPPING LED FLASHLIGHTS

The marketplace now offers a plethora of LED flashlights. That's necessary in order to address the great diversity of requirements that buyers wish to satisfy. But it's also a challenge, because the complexity begs more of the shopper. I would like to pose a broad LED flashlight shopping plan. It is designed to help a person who has had little or no experience with LED flashlights as well as one who is properly primed, but now wants to land his dream torch.

First, if you don't have an LED flashlight, start by getting a few inexpensive ones. Until you experience the technology firsthand in a wide range of general-purpose applications, it will be very hard for you to meaningfully evaluate higher-end flashlights that play to special objectives. A 3-pack of Techlite 200s fills the bill better than any other product offering I've seen. For only about twenty bucks you'll have 3 high-performance GP flashlights. It's a great opportunity to replace some old, bulky conventional flashlights of lackluster performance. And, who knows, you could be pleasantly surprised! These GP flashlights just may meet most of your special objectives as well. In any case, this model will establish an important set of benchmarks and provide a basis for real-world experiences that can put you in a commanding position to properly evaluate other LED flashlights.

Second, pursue your special flashlight (if you still think you need one) by comparing candidates in all ways relevant to your intended uses. Here's an alphabetical checklist of some key topics:

BATTERIES: Common size?
BENCHTOP STABILITY: Is flashlight likely to roll off bench and fall to floor?
BODY COLOR: Important when worn on the catwalk. You know what I mean.
COST: At half the price, you can buy twice as many, doubling access and redundancy.
FIREARM COMPATIBILITY: Easily mountable?
FOCUS: Do your uses really call for variable focus?
GRIP: Knurling is gold standard for extreme grip.
IMPACT RESISTANCE: Was this capability tested per ANSI FL1?
LED TECHNOLOGY: For example, Cree XPG is more advanced than Cree XPE.
LIGHT HOMOGENEITY: Intensity should transition smoothly and lack artifacts.
LUMINOSITY: Was this verified per ANSI FL1?
MODALITY: High, low, strobe, off, etc.
OFF-MODE DRAIN: Can flashlight die from just 12 months of storage?
QUALITY OF CONSTRUCTION: Is it as well-made as Techlite 200?
RELIABILITY: Refer to credible reviews.
RUN TIME IN EACH OPERATING MODE: Were values acquired per ANSI FL1?
SELF DEFENSE: Scalloped bezel?
SIZE: A flashlight is for naught if too klutzy to keep at the ready.
WARRANTEE: No-fuss, full-refund, lifetime satisfaction warrantee?
WATER RESISTANCE: Was this claim tested per ANSI FL1?
WEIGHT: Lighter for carriability. Heavier for self defense.

Finally, buy the flashlight that is best for YOU.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Flashlight is great, July 25, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Techlite Lumen Master 200 Lumens High-Intensity CREE XPG L.E.D. Tactical Flashlight, 3 Pack (Misc.)
These flashlights work great and I really like them. I would love to leave a 5 star review, but when I opened the package only 2 of them worked. The metal ring on the bottom of the battery case is missing on one making it useless. I e-mailed the seller and customer service for the company requesting a battery pack/cage replacement only. I have gotten no response from either. If anyone has any idea how to buy just a battery pack/cage, please let me know. I have seen other reviews indicating that not all of their lights worked. So, just know.....the lights are great....IF they all work. I will return them since I am not interested in paying over $10 for each one.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bang for the buck, June 30, 2012
This review is from: Techlite Lumen Master 200 Lumens High-Intensity CREE XPG L.E.D. Tactical Flashlight, 3 Pack (Misc.)
There are plenty of great technical reviews here to provide you with ample information if you are searching for a flashlights that go beyond mere toys. I'll simply echo the current 4.9 star rating. I've had literally dozens of small flashlights like these, and I was blown away when I turned these on. They are BRIGHT. I actually got these for my kids, who like something to use for, among other things, reading in bed at night. These are probably a bit too bright for that! I now intend to keep these on hand for tasks that require a bit more light. The build quality seems excellent, and the size makes them ideal for carrying in a vehicle (the strobe feature is a real bonus for certain emergency situations) or keeping in drawers around the house in case of emergencies. For the cost, everyone ought to pick up at least one pack of these. My only gripe is the relatively short battery life -- rated 1 hour on high, 4 hours on low (on the positive side, the low setting should almost always suffice). I'm hopeful that I'll actually get more life than this, but I've not been able to burn through a set of batteries yet. I'd lower my rating to 4.5 stars for this reason if I could, but this is a minor gripe as these flashlights excel in every other way. Grab a set.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beats everything else, September 19, 2012
By 
Mountain Medic (Santa Cruz Mountains) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Techlite Lumen Master 200 Lumens High-Intensity CREE XPG L.E.D. Tactical Flashlight, 3 Pack (Misc.)
I've bought 4-5 three packs from Costco over the last 2-3 years.

One mounted to a pump shotgun for 2 years. Working strong.
One mounted to a double barrel 12 gauge with a wicked kick. Still works despite the recoil.

Two mounted on a structural fire fighting helmet for over a year. Brighter than everything on the fire scenes except the big light boxes, used last week search and rescue in coastal fog and threw beams better than 50 yards! I've been inside a structure fire that melted the metal rain gutters next to my head and coated the lights with soot, wiped them off and they were fine. Dropped the helmet and lights dozens of times and leave them sitting in the back of my truck to hot and cold temperatures and no breakdown.

Left one submersed in a hot tub for several days. Turned it on underwater, worked find and a month later still works.

The beam is white, solid, no gaps. Button is a simple three function, good feedback.

THE Brightest, MOST Durable flashlight I've ever owned.

I'll buy anything this company sells.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars for this one!, December 4, 2012
By 
Eddie Wannabee (Western Hemisphere) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Techlite Lumen Master 200 Lumens High-Intensity CREE XPG L.E.D. Tactical Flashlight, 3 Pack (Misc.)
One thing I have to admit, right here and now: the amazon reviewers are like friends to me. Friends I probably never will see, but nevertheless they have so many times helped me out, that I have a strong respect for what they stand for. So In the same context that reviewers have shared their opinions, suggestions (like a much better bargain somewhere else that should be noted), and good knowledge of so many products, I like to send a "Heads Up" or "Red Alert" on this particular product.
Yes, these are small size flashlights but they look good. I was about to purchase this deal here at amazon, but I had heard from fellow reviewers that Costco might be selling them for less, which I knew from past experience was very possible. Woke up this morning, feeling like crap due to an all areas cold, but since I am now heavy into flashlights and lumens, I did call the store near me in SJC, CA, and fellow reviewers were correct. They have this deal, but to my surprise, with a significant difference. Instead of 200 Lumens, these babies rate at 250 Lumens. Together with the fact that they are dispensed with batteries and the price so much nicer (I am not trying to offend amazon's sensibilities-if it's possible such a giant can blink an eye due to emotions), but the end result was alarmingly delightful. Great deal for a high rated item, plus the confidence of buying from a place like that one where all returns are accepted if needed, I thought I immediately write a review and mention this.
Here they are telling me that I have went a little overboard for flashlights. After years of using a very mediocre (30 Lumens at most) flashlights, they simply stopped working. While looking for replacement I bought the following: MagLite with D batteries (131 Lumens), A pair of Life Gear (they came in two's 400 Lumens), Coast HP17? (605 Lumens very very cool), a much smaller Coast, baby of the family kind of like these Techlite's (131 Lumens), Life Gear again on sale (1000 Lumens), and now, for now, these other babies with a surprising 250 Lumens.
Yes, I been known to go compulsive when something grabs me the correct way. Now I keep eyeing, kind of see but do not own for now, at the real bad asses out there like Olight Flashlight (a particular one that sells way above $300 and has 2200 Lumens), called the Intimidator. I must be bored out of my mind but I can not get this one out of my mind, but thanks to my wallet who as of late is screaming for common sense, I have yet to pull the trigger! Who would have thought flashlights were so cool and I only started on October of 2012, What about Surefire, Fenix, etc? Come On! Give me a break, at least till the Holidays are through. Unless I buy everyone a flashlight and take possession once the novelty wears out. Can not do it.
Techlite Lumen Master 200 Lumens High-Intensity CREE XPG L.E.D. Tactical Flashlight, 3 Pack, great lights 4.5 Stars.
PS: there is another Techlite with 500 Lumens on sale at the place I mentioned above where I purchased mine (don't want to say the mane twice but this one ends with .com), until January 3? $49.99 included shipping and handling. I am almost sure I am not going to last and it will become a must have item, while everyone around me keep asking themselves: what in the world is really going with this fool and all these flashlights? Enticing for sure!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great lights at a great price!, July 31, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Techlite Lumen Master 200 Lumens High-Intensity CREE XPG L.E.D. Tactical Flashlight, 3 Pack (Misc.)
I'm almost convinced 2 sayings are now busted:
1. You get what you pay for.
2. If it seems too good to be true, it is.

So far these have proved to be with far more than I paid and too good to be true... the brightness exceeds my expectations and does appear to be pretty accurate although I don't have a light meter to prove it, I have tested them against other lights that are 140 lumens and these are quite a bit brighter and whiter.

I'd pay this much for one... 3 is just an incredible value, not to mention they come with Duracell batteries.

I'll update my review if necessary as time goes on, but I really have to say these are a great value and I wouldn't hesitate buying them again.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Good to hear there are so few bad ones, July 14, 2012
By 
rosalie monaco (Powder Springs, GA, US) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Techlite Lumen Master 200 Lumens High-Intensity CREE XPG L.E.D. Tactical Flashlight, 3 Pack (Misc.)
I also bought my 3 pack at COSTCO for 15 bucks. Two of the three lights were bad. One light had a bad battery cage where only 1 of 3 batteries made contact so that it was putting out only 1.5 volts. The other had a bad switch such that when the light was off it would drain power. The light used up 6 batteries in 2 weeks when it was turned off. Was able to make 2 good ones out of the 3 so all in all not a bad deal. I did return them to COSTCO for one reason. I tried repeatedly to contact TECHLITE by phone and email but did not even get a courtesy response. COSTCO is always great about returns; but if TECHLITE, or any company or vendor doesnt have the integrity to back their product they dont deserve my money. I will pay 10 times what these cost for a quality product that is backed by a good company.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars LED Flashlight Comparison: Surefire G2 vs. Fenix E21 vs. Techlite Lumen Master 200, November 11, 2012
This review is from: Techlite Lumen Master 200 Lumens High-Intensity CREE XPG L.E.D. Tactical Flashlight, 3 Pack (Misc.)
Flashlight development has come a long way since the old EverReady D-cell incandescent-filament flashlights. The development of high-power LED bulbs and customer demand for reliability and high performance in flashlights for tactical situations (military combat, police, fire & rescue) have given us many choices in small but powerful flashlights.

I own three of the popular LED flashlights and wanted to do a comparison. I use these flashlights in my cars primarily for emergency situations and at home for outdoor activities at night (walking the dog), emergencies and other occasional use. Reliability is most important to me for emergency use. I prefer that flashlights used in the outdoors are rated at least 100 lumens of light output for adequate lighting over a larger area. I use lithium primary batteries (Energizer Advanced Lithium, NOT rechargeable lithium-ion) in these flashlights rather than alkaline batteries because lithium batteries provide 2-3 times the runtime, have a longer shelf-life (10-15 years vs. 7 years), perform better in cold weather, and are MUCH less prone to leakage that can permanently damage these flashlights. The lithium battery tends to cost about twice as much as an alkaline battery, but because they last at least twice as long during use, the cost per hour of illumination is the same for the lithium and alkaline batteries. The longer runtime and superior reliability of the lithium batteries are simply worth the extra cost. If you use one of these flashlights for a few hours every day, you should seriously consider rechargeable nickel-metal-hydride batteries (or possibly lithium-ion batteries ONLY if it is at the right voltage level for your flashlight) to save money on replacement batteries; be aware however that rechargeable batteries have a very short shelf life between recharge cycles because they quickly drain their charge over a few weeks even when not being used.

The capacity of a battery stored for a period of time in an LED flashlight will decrease over time, even if it unused, because of two factors: (1) self-drain of a battery in storage and (2) a small amount of power that the LED flashlight circuitry constantly consumes called parasitic drain. As the battery capacity is reduced during the storage period, you will have shorter flashlight runtime. You can expect a lithium primary battery at room temperature to self-drain at a rate where you lose about 1.5% of the battery's capacity each year (a lithium battery should be a 93% capacity after 5 years in storage). Parasitic drain from the LED flashlight circuitry depends on the flashlight model with newer (2012) models having much less drain because of improved circuitry compared to older (2009-2011) models. It has been reported that the (2010) Surefire G2 and (2011) Fenix E21 models have parasitic drain that could reduce battery capacity 15% per year. However, both Surefire and Fenix have eliminated the parasitic drain in these models by having the user unscrew (loosen) the end-cap-switch enough to disconnect the electrical circuit inside the flashlight; when the user needs to use the flashlight you must screw (tighten) the end-cap-switch back to turn the circuit back on. If you follow this procedure, a lithium battery stored in the Surefire or Fenix should be at 93% capacity after 5 years in storage and 86% after 10 years in storage. If you do not follow this procedure a lithium battery stored in the Surefire or Fenix should be at 22% capacity after 5 years in storage. You cannot disconnect the circuit in the TechLite LumenMaster 200 by unscrewing the end-cap-switch, but fortunately the reported parasitic drain is relatively low in which the battery capacity is reduced about 3.7% per year; if you consider both battery self-drain and parasitic drain, a lithium battery stored in the TechLite should be at 75% capacity after 5 years in storage and 52% after 10 years in storage.

The key factors that I used for this flashlight comparison are purchase price, compactness (size and weight), light output, battery life, battery cost, reliability, and performance. I have attached photos to illustrate some of the points of my review. Here is a summary of my comparison of the LED flashlights and an incandescent- filament flashlight:

Surefire G2 (Nitrolon weatherproof body/single light output)
Purchase Price: $40 - $50
Light Output (Lumens- Hi/Lo/Strobe): 80/ NA/ NA
Size (length/ diameter-in.)/ Weight (including batteries-oz.): 5.20" x 1.25"/ 4.34 oz.
Lithium Batteries (Type/Cost): 2x CR123/$3-$5 (for 2 batteries)
Estimated Runtime (minutes) with Energizer lithium batteries @ Hi/Lo/Strobe Lumen Output: 720/ NA/ NA
Estimated Battery Capacity after 5 yrs in Flashlight: 93% (22% without loosening the end-cap-switch when not in use)
Comments: A white, more widely dispersed spotlight that is less bright than the Fenix E21 or Techlite 200. A twist-style on-off switch with a momentary-push-on feature in the end-cap-switch is less convenient but you can loosen the end-cap-switch to eliminate parasitic power drain and prolong the shelf life of batteries when the flashlight is not in use. This made-in-the-USA flashlight has a legendary reliability. This model has been discontinued but newer G2 models with higher lumen output are available at a higher price point.

Fenix E21 (Aluminum weatherproof body/ Hi-Lo light output + lanyard)
Purchase Price: $30 - $40
Light Output (Lumens- Hi/Lo/Strobe): 154/ 52/ NA
Size (length/ diameter-in.)/ Weight (including batteries-oz.): 6.46" x 1.0"/ 5.07 oz.
Lithium Batteries (Type/Cost): 2x AA/ $3-$4 (for two batteries)
Estimated Runtime (minutes) with Energizer lithium batteries @ Hi/Lo/Strobe Lumen Output: 330/ 1800/ NA
Estimated Runtime (minutes) with Energizer alkaline batteries @ Hi/Lo/Strobe Lumen Output: 135/ 660/ NA
Estimated Battery Capacity after 5 yrs in Flashlight: 93% (22% without loosening the end-cap-switch when not in use)
Comments: Relatively bright white spotlight with a narrow-focus. Has a convenient "clicky-style" on-off switch in the end-cap-switch but a less convenient head rotation to adjust from Hi-to-Lo light output, and you can loosen the end-cap-switch to eliminate parasitic drain. Made in China with excellent quality that is comparable (but not equal) to the quality of the Surefire G2.

TechLite Lumen Master 200 (Aluminum weatherproof body/ Hi-Lo-Strobe light output + lanyard)
Purchase Price: $6 - $11 (sold in 3-packs for $18- $33)
Light Output (Lumens- Hi/Lo/Strobe): 200/ 105/ 200 (pulse)
Size (length/ diameter-in.)/ Weight (including batteries-oz.): 4.51" x 1.44"/ 4.88 oz.
Lithium Batteries (Type/Cost): 3x AAA/ $3-$5 (for 3 batteries)
Estimated Runtime (minutes) with Energizer lithium batteries @ Hi/Lo/Strobe Lumen Output: 198/ 450/ 396
Estimated Runtime (minutes) with Energizer alkaline batteries @ Hi/Lo/Strobe Lumen Output: 60/ 240/ 120
Estimated Battery Capacity after 5 yrs in Flashlight: 75%
Comments: A white narrow-focus spotlight that is the brightest of the three LED flashlights. You can switch from Hi-Lo-Strobe-Off with a convenient "clicky-style" switch in the end-cap, but you cannot loosen the end-cap-switch to eliminate parasitic drain. Made in China with very good quality that is slightly below the quality of the Fenix E21.

EverReady D-Cell Incandescent (Plastic weatherproof body)
Purchase Price: $3 - $7
Light Output (Lumens- Hi/Lo/Strobe): 10-20/ NA/NA
Size (length/ diameter-in.)/ Weight (including batteries-oz.): 7.87" x 2.33"/ 14.20 oz.
Alkaline Batteries (Type/Cost): 2x D/ $2-$3 (for 2 batteries)
Estimated Runtime (minutes) with Energizer alkaline batteries @ Hi/Lo/Strobe Lumen Output: 210/ NA/ NA
Estimated Battery Capacity after 5 yrs in Flashlight: 90%
Comments: Relatively dim, unfocused yellowish light beam. Has a "clicky-style" on-off switch in the side of the flashlight. Uses either a halogen or krypton filament bulb with a very short life of 10-15 hours; LED bulbs have at least 25,000 hours of life.

Overall, I would recommend the TechLite Lumen Master 200 with lithium AAA batteries as the best value for an emergency/ general purpose occasional-use LED flashlight. The Surefire G2 (or its successor products) or the Fenix E21 with lithium primary batteries or rechargeable nickel-metal-hydride batteries are recommended for more demanding routine use by police, emergency personnel or contractors. And one last thing, it's now time to get rid of all those inefficient, obsolete EverReady D-cell incandescent-filament flashlights that have accumulated in your storage closet!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Lights are excellent. The battery holders are cheap and 2 of the 3 did not work., November 25, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Techlite Lumen Master 200 Lumens High-Intensity CREE XPG L.E.D. Tactical Flashlight, 3 Pack (Misc.)
I've read manyhat have failed switches etc. The lights are excellent if you can get them to work. all the problems are with the cheaply made battery holders, the first light I unpacked failed to work, the 2nd was the same. Loaded the batterys in the "holder" and checked with a volt meter. No voltage, found that the connection "spring" is not making contact. therefore, no voltage. If you "wiggle" etc you can get it to work. It's not the light, it's the battery holder. It's a shame that you can make and excellent light, and then provide an extremely poor battery holder to power it. That's why only a 3 star rateing.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Work Great as Bicycle Headlights, August 26, 2012
This review is from: Techlite Lumen Master 200 Lumens High-Intensity CREE XPG L.E.D. Tactical Flashlight, 3 Pack (Misc.)
I bought a 3-pack of these (this new 200-lumens model) from my local Costco for $19.99 a few weeks ago (sorry Amazon the local place beat you out this time) to use as headlights for a new bicycle I bought since for that price I figured even if they don't hold up over the long run they would at least get me by until I could buy some better ones. So far they have worked out just great without any problems. Would give them five stars except for the fact that I'm not all that keen on the AAA size batteries and I wish they used AA size since if you are using them on a regular basis (such as using them as bicycle headlights on your daily commute) it will cost you more to keep them fed with batteries using the AAA size which don't last half long as the larger AA size and cost just as much or more even if you are using NiMH rechargeable batteries like I am since you will be recharging them twice as often and thus wearing them out twice as fast since they can only be recharged so many times.

To use them as bicycle headlights just buy a couple good quality stainless hose clamps and loop them together, one around the handle-bars and the other around the flashlight. Mounts them good and solid and the results are way better then any of those junky plastic bike headlights or the junky plastic mounts to use a flashlight as a bike headlight.

Check the product photo I uploaded to see what I'm talking about.
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