Technicolor Movies: The History of Dye Transfer Printing

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ISBN-13: 978-0786418091
ISBN-10: 0786418095
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Technicolor Movies: The History of Dye Transfer Printing + Glorious Technicolor: The Movies' Magic Rainbow; Ninetieth Anniversary Edition + Harnessing the Technicolor Rainbow: Color Design in the 1930s
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"A detailed history" -- Classic Images

"Exceptional...key volume...lays out the facts...collectors of film memorabilia and DVDs will find this book indispensable" -- Fulvue Drive-in.com

"Succinctly and in depth...vivid and precise as the process itself" -- Choice

About the Author

Film director Richard W. Haines is also the author of The Moviegoing Experience, 1968–2001 2003). He lives in New York.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 152 pages
  • Publisher: McFarland & Company (November 12, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786418095
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786418091
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6.1 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,583,479 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By The Kid on April 29, 1998
Format: Library Binding
The author correctly points out the weaknesses of the Eastmancolor process and gives support to the superiority of dye transfer processed films. Mr. Haines has an excellent eye for color, and he lists a complete history of films using three strip technicolor and dye transfer matrices. He is not afraid to attack the studios and Kodak's short sightedness in dumping the process. As a result, film negatives are fading fast, and many films are losing their original look. He does list one chinese company that still uses the process, and I hope that they are still in business. Sadly films will never look as good again. END
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Cannucklehead Film Addict on May 21, 2010
Format: Paperback
One of the reviewers above compared Technicolor to Spielberg's Minority Report (originated on Eastmancolor stock) unfavourably. But Minority Report, like many contemporary films, was deliberately desaturated and so the blame doesn't lie with the choice of film stock so much as in the director's choice. He wanted a world drained of color to give an impression of a bleak future. As well, many Technicolor films of the 40s and 50s were just as deliberately over-saturated, in part because Technicolor insisted that their own color consultants be on the film set, and that saturated look was felt by them to be good advertising for their product. Different eras; different artistic choices. When color is rare, you want it to really pop; when it's commonplace, you can do different and sometimes more interesting things with it.

All that said, however, Technicolor, though a difficult process to create and film with, was a much superior method of reproducing colors, if only because the original films are comprised of three black and white strips, each filtered for a different color. Whereas color stocks like Eastmancolor fade, Technicolor originals fade much less, because they aren't color stocks, but black and white. The films are then printed onto single strip films in much the same way as color pictures are printed in books and magazines, using the original strips as color separations. There is much more that could be said, but read Haines, who does an excellent job of laying it all out in crisp, clear prose.

And for a briefer explanation of all this, do a google search for "american widescreen museum." That site has a vast array of information not just on color, but also on the many many different widescreen systems.
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23 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Richard W. Haines on March 5, 2003
Format: Library Binding
This is a very complex book with a lot of technical information, some of which I didn't understand. However, I did get the overall gist of the writer's arguement which is the Technicolor process was vastly superior to the Eastmancolor process that replaced it. I've seen some 16mm film collector prints in Technicolor which were gorgeous. One of them was "The Adventures of Robin Hood" which was beautiful. Rich and vibrant...it took my breath away. I also saw 16mm Technicolor prints of "North by Northwest" and "Singin' in the Rain" which were spectacular. Boy do I love Technicolor. You can actually buy these prints on ebay if you have a lot of money.
I can't believe Hollywood abandoned this process. It's hard to compare old Technicolor movies with current Eastmancolor films like "Minority Report" which is drained of color and looks terrible. Are current directors color blind? I guess most people have never seen a Technicolor print and don't know what they're missing...
This book is better than Fred Basten's "Glorious Technicolor" in that it details all the different processes that used dye transfer printing including Cinerama, Technirama, 3-D, VistaVision and CinemaScope. Basten's book only covers the 3 strip camera and pretty much ignores the fifties and sixties. This book lists every film that was printed in Technicolor and lists them in each category or process. My only complaint is that unlike the Basten book, there are no color pictures. There are a lot of technical diagrams though.
In Haines second book, "The Moviegoing Experience 1968-2001", he made the technical aspects of his subject a bit easier to understand but this book is still an excellent reference source.
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ronald D. Lindow on August 30, 2008
Format: Paperback
One of the central facts presented is that Technicolor is like no other motion picture color process. And that it has been nearly abandoned in the USA in favor more efficient processes, none of which are as good as Technicolor.

Amazingly, the only remaining Technicolor lab on earth is in Beijing.
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1 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 24, 2001
Format: Library Binding
This book provides an extensive review of the technicolor procsss and its development over the history of its use.
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