Qty:1
  • List Price: $23.95
  • Save: $5.51 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In stock but may require an extra 1-2 days to process.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Shows signs of use * Item is already inside Amazon's warehouse, ships fast * Customer support including tracking numbers through Your Account on Amazon.com * Satisfaction guaranteed
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Ego in Freud's Theory and in the Technique of Psychoanalysis, 1954-1955 (Vol. Book II) (The Seminar of Jacques Lacan) Paperback – January 17, 1991


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$18.44
$13.75 $7.97
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

The Ego in Freud's Theory and in the Technique of Psychoanalysis, 1954-1955 (Vol. Book II)  (The Seminar of Jacques Lacan) + The Seminar of Jacques Lacan: Book 1, Freud's Papers on Technique, 1953-1954 + The Seminar of Jacques Lacan: The Psychoses (Vol. Book III)  (The Seminar of Jacques Lacan) (Bk. 3)
Price for all three: $56.99

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Year-End Kindle Daily Deals
Load your library with great books for $2.99 or less each, today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: The Seminar of Jacques Lacan (Book 2)
  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (January 17, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393307093
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393307092
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 0.1 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #718,086 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The Seminar Books I and II have a special place because of their value as an introduction to Lacan. . . . [They] are a sure path of entry into Lacan's critique of ego psychology. . . . Lacan's work underscores that part of Freud's message that is most revolutionary for our time. The individual is 'decentered.' There is no autonomous self. What sex was to the Victorians, the question of free will is to our new Fin-de-Siecle.” (Sherry Turkle - London Review of Books)

“A rare opportunity to experience Lacan as a teacher. . . . The publication of these two early seminars . . . may allow Lacan's work to do what it does most remarkably: shed light on, and expand, the theoretical implications of psychoanalysis, but also train a new generation of psychoanalysts by asking again and again: what exactly do we do when we do psychoanalysis?” (Lisa Kennedy - Voice Literary Supplement)

Language Notes

Text: English, French (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

The psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan (1901-1981) was one of the twentieth century's most influential thinkers. His many published works include Ecrits and The Seminars.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Matthew D. Jones on January 30, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Any didactic review of Lacan's Seminars is, perhaps, deeply ironic. The seminars themselves were oral performances, and this volume, like all the other Seminars, consists of notes of Lacan's lectures, edited in French by his son-in-law, Jacques-Alain Miller. Lacan's pedagogical technique relied on the ambiguities of meaning in language, particularly spoken language, to evoke a quasi-poetic or religious sense that transcends words, while simultaneously he elaborated a structured psychoanalytic theory, which he insisted was merely an exegesis of what was implicit in Freud's work.

With that said, this volume, the second of his Seminars presented in the 1954 - 1955 academic year, is as good a place as any to plunge into his work. These lectures focus on Lacan's concept of the "symbolic order," and the radical alienation of the human subject from that order, while, simultaneously, the same order is constitutive of the subject, telling the subject who s/he "is" (to the extent s/he "is" anything!). In this and later Seminars, Lacan will develop these ideas into his notion of the subject's relation the Other (with a capital "O"), and the idea of the split subject, who is caught between his or her unconscious and the symbolic order, structurally separated from both, and who only appears momentarily when he or she speaks "I."

The reputation of Lacan's work for being extraordinarily obscure and difficult is well deserved. All I can say is that I have found it worth the effort to attempt to grasp his thinking. Some knowledge of Freudian theory is a prerequisite to make any sense of what Lacan is talking about, and a familiarity with continental philosophy, particularly Hegelian philosophy, is very helpful.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Vincent on February 22, 2014
Format: Paperback
For the absolute uninitiated, no, this is not the place to begin. I would recommend Ellie Ragland-Sullivan's book on the Philosophy of Lacan. For those who understand psychoanalysis and its decentering of consciousness and reality itself, Lacan is fundamental. The problem with Lacan is the complexity--he is nowhere near as accessible as Freud, except in these first two seminars. Here, Lacan is trying to get the seminars off the ground, working with a group of very intelligent people committed to psychoanalysis, but still struggling to understand a dialectical process that offers no place to stand and look objectively. Lacan's fundamental problem was always the attempt to make a model that was as dynamic as the process he was trying to clarify. In this book and in Book I, the reader will find a Lacan that is more accessible than anywhere else, and it is downright engaging. In these first two books the reader feels like they are in the seminars themselves--not at a performance like some of the later seminars. They are a priceless introduction.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
difficult book, but very rewarding. texts like this are a constant source of inspiration, mostly because they are so impenetrable. everytime you read it there is something new hidden. Reading other books by hegel, freud, marx, and saussure makes it easier to finish this one, but if you don't mind being lost in the woods jump right in. don't try to understand the text interpret it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Case Quarter VINE VOICE on March 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
one of the first luminaries, and not the first, lacan mentions here is socrates, father, i suppose, of the dialectic. this seminar is marked by participation, which lacan insists upon, everyone present must participate with questions. here those in attendance get a feel for things psychoanalytic.

discussed is poe's purloined letter. and discussed is the lacanic triad: the symbolic, the real, the imaginary.

the translator of this seminar is sylvana tomaselli, her identity as a countess overshadowing her role as a scholar. not that this has anything to do with her work here. merely a bit of trivia. now were she a queen....
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again