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Techniques for Nuclear and Particle Physics Experiments: A How-to Approach Paperback – February 25, 1994

ISBN-13: 978-3540572800 ISBN-10: 3540572805 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 382 pages
  • Publisher: Springer; 2nd edition (February 25, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 3540572805
  • ISBN-13: 978-3540572800
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 0.9 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #575,904 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By J. Enders on August 22, 2000
Format: Paperback
Leo's book is a good, concise and concerning standard methods especially in nuclear spectroscopy up-to-date summary of the field. The basic physics ideas are introduced, although not too deeply discussed (but this is a book for the experimentalist, therefore no objections). It is a helpful companion in simple experimental considerations which come to an experimental nuclear spectroscopist every day: The color codes of resistors and the overview over the connectors in a CAMAC crate are examples for these features.
Elaborate references are given for each section that make it possible for the reader to find additional descriptions rather easily. Additional insight on dosimetry and radiation damage and some remarks on statistics make this book an interesting alternative to G.F. Knoll's "Radiation detection and measurement".
The emphasis of Leo's approach is surely (a) on a concise overview rather than an in-depth discussion and (b) on nuclear spectroscopy (gamma and particle detection at some MeV or so) rather than medium and large-scale high-energy physics experiments. Widely used components of high-energy physics equipment are, however, presented, but additional literature might be needed.
One final remark to my fellow reviewer Fabio: One example for a "statistical process" is e.g. the number of electron-hole pairs created in the detection of a charged particle or gamma ray. This process is truely statistical, i.e. it does not depend on things that the experimentator has at hand. The intrinsic resolution of a high-purity Germanium detector with respect to a, say, 3 MeV gamma ray cannot be changed (at least to a large extent). Have a look into Leo's book if you don't believe me!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jacob Feldman on October 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
On my opinion this book is very well developed with theoretical and practical information with exercises (examples) that helps in subject understanding and study. Would definitely recommend to everyone starting in college nuclear physics. Believe has data/information that can help to personal involved in research, development and engineering of nuclear physics.
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By Abdulrahman on September 26, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It was as what I expected. Thanks amazon for the delivery.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Clarisse Tur on November 10, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book was like new (as promised by the seller) and reached me in a very timely manner.
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6 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 27, 1998
Format: Paperback
It's a good book: very good English, it treats quite everything from the point of view of CAUSES! It's full of precise references (good for the thesis!).
Expecially good topics: ionization and scintillation detectors; photomultipliers. Lacks: calorimetres and Cerenkov counters! For these topics I suggest: 'Particle Detectors' (many auth.), Cambridge University Press.
Just one thing about statistics: you have always to substitute this sentence:
''... because of the statistical nature of the process...''
with
''...because of the uncertainties related to the process, we choose to treat it as statistical...'' OK, it's a bit longer; but are you sure that all advanced physicians know that Caos does not exist as a real entity? It's just a choice of the experimenter to supply lacks in understanding and measuring the process or to simplify it. If you don't believe so, I ask you: why do you make research? Let's talk about it.
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