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Technology of the Gods: The Incredible Sciences of the Ancients Paperback – December 1, 1999


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Technology of the Gods: The Incredible Sciences of the Ancients + The Ancient Alien Question: A New Inquiry Into the Existence, Evidence, and Influence of Ancient Visitors + Chariots of the Gods: Unsolved Mysteries of the Past
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 343 pages
  • Publisher: Adventures Unlimited Press; 1St Edition edition (December 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0932813739
  • ISBN-13: 978-0932813732
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (81 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #41,506 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

David Hatcher Childress is the author of 15 books, including The Lost Cities Series, The Time Travel Handbook and The Fantastic Inventions of Nikola Tesla. He has appeared in numerous documentaries about Atlantis, ancient mysteries and UFOs, including The Mysterious Origins of Man, with Charlton Heston, and The Search For Atlantis, with Richard Crenna. He also appears regularly on national and international radio programs. He lives near Chicago.

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Customer Reviews

Very interesting book to read.
Cas2020
So I Have had a few of David's books that have just walked away..
pmgeorgic
The author, however, doesn't engage in science.
Bonam Pak

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

232 of 244 people found the following review helpful By Onca_child on August 22, 2000
Format: Paperback
I bought this book with great anticipation...was on the waiting list for months! When it finally became available I couldn't wait to read it. I flipped through it in even more anticipation at the fantastic pictures and illustrations once I got it.
I have to say I was thrilled and dissappointed all at once. The content of the book was absolutely fascinating. The author stirred up subjects that totally engulfed me; but as I'd read into each, I found him wandering off into some other rather uninteresting part of the subject and leaving me dieing to get back to the origional thought...which he often didn't. I got the feeling that he hurried the book and that it never really got edited... Thoughts ran off the page and never got finished; as if pages were missing from the printing.
I'd like to see this entire book re-thought and rewritten, because the CONTENT of the book is astounding to say the least. I'd recommend it to anyone who's digging into ancient history/origins because it has so much interesting material. But I would certainly warn them that it's not a well written or easy to follow book. I actually found myself getting bored with the author's wandering thoughts, especially when he teased with a fascinating subject, then wandered off to la la land.
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67 of 74 people found the following review helpful By apoem TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 8, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Even if you do not agree with everything in this book, this author does a great job of discussing technology that ancient people had. The text is highlighted by pictures that enhance many of this statements he makes. The author does a great job of taking information from a variety of sources to prove his points and clarify his writing.
My two complaints are that some of the pictures are so small that they are frustrating because you can't see much of the detail. Second, the assumption is made that you know about many of the places in this book and I don't. I had never heard of many of these places until reading this book. I would have appreciated a few maps to help clarify where some of these places are.
Great book. Very interesting. Enjoy.
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71 of 81 people found the following review helpful By Gwynne C. Spencer on September 22, 2006
Format: Paperback
The topics are covered in a Ripley's Believe It Or Not Breathless Rush that leaves the reader wondering where it all will lead. Because there is no index, you will find it difficult to go back and find the inscrutible passages. Because there are virtually no margins (1/4 inch instead of a standard 1 inch) there is no place to write notes or even put stickums without affecting the text. The lines are closely leaded (too close together for comfortable reading) perhaps to save paper or cut costs, but regardless, a less-than-comfortable reading experience. Numerous anecdotes and examples are repeated, as if nobody bothered to edit the text, but rather just wrote it down from a transcribed tape or video. The lack of attention to these basics of book-reader's expectations makes you wonder about the validity of the contents. Good info, but bad format.
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33 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Wile E Coyote on April 6, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book was quite a disappointment, it's poorly written, and contains so much nonsense that anyone with even a modicum of education will question his conclusions.

Just look at the references if you want some examples. The sections on Vimanas, for example is referenced on the Vyimanika Shastra, a book written by Pandit Subbaraya Shastry, who believed that all the information from ancient time is available in the airwaves, and just need someone tuned in to them to access it. He 'channeled' this information, and dictated the book sometime around 1919..... not in the 4th century BC as claimed by Childress. He even includes pictures drawn an engineering student sometime around 1955. Just a quick glance will tell you he clearly slept through all of his physics, and aerodynamics lectures, and Childress suggests they are part of the original text.

Childress does raise some interesting points, however he discredits himself so often with wild claims and poor or no referencing, that the book reads like a work of fiction. Several times his only reference is that a story was published in a news paper - hardly a ringing endorsement of truth. I have a book on Myths and Urban legends, and almost every one of them was published in a news paper at some time or another.

Such a shame really as the subject matter is very interesting, and many others have done this subject much more justice. I will admit that it was an interesting read, but I found myself laughing more than being gripped by new an intriguing information - and page 164 being repeated verbatim on page 204 was just sloppy, but that's just representative of the book as a whole really.

If you can spare $10 and a bit of your time, have a read. You might find something of interest in there.
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76 of 93 people found the following review helpful By COSMOS on December 15, 2007
Format: Paperback
For those not researching much of what is written in Technology of the Gods, the stories would appear to be so fascinatingly convincing and wild and, for the most part, they are! However, if one were to REALLY do a little research and see how much of what Childress write is actually TRUE, they would find that much (and I would say, most) of it is just plain science fiction. Period. As I read Technology of the Gods, wanted badly to verify the accuracy of what Childress claimed, because as it turned out, the book made ever more outrageous claims as you get deeper and deeper into the book.

I wouldn't know where to start with a review, but a few facts stand out. For one, Childress quotes very extensively (and almost to the point of making his own analysis mute) several authors, such as Andrew Tomas, who have been known to write falsities themselves. Tomas is a good example. Most of what Tomas writes about cannot be tracked down mostly because he never left any sources for his outrageous claims. The "Vedic UFO's" from which Childress gets most of his ancient Indian Vimana ideas from (including illustrations of them) were inspired by a book, Vaimanika Shastra, that was claimed to have been "channeled" by the transcribed author, Pandit Subbaraya Shastry. Childress performs these same erroncies in which claims cannot be traced, verified, or researched. This is not science...this is pseudoscience. Or better yet: science fiction. This is a type of religion, in which you must simply believe what is said and leave it at that.
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