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Technomanifestos: Visions of the Information Revolutionaries Hardcover – July 4, 2002


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Texere; 1 edition (July 4, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1587991039
  • ISBN-13: 978-1587991035
  • Product Dimensions: 9.9 x 6.1 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,383,259 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Adam Brate is a technology writer who lives in downtown Manhattan, just around the corner from Silicon Alley. Brate's first book, Making the Cisco Connection, is a business history of the super corporation that builds the Internet's infrastructure.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By "garyschlecker" on November 26, 2002
Format: Hardcover
"Technomanifestos" is neither another Unix manual nor another cynical, Gen-X page turner. Rather, it is a thoughtful book that, in accessible language for the non-specialist, excerpts and discusses the fascinating and wide-sweeping ideologies and social goals set out in the groundbreaking writings of the information revolution's key figures. What were the founders of the internet aiming for, beyond another intra-office communication tool or the ability to shop on-line? What exactly paved the way for today's flurry of cyber-activity? How compatible are current attempts to legislate cyber-space with the information revolution's original ideals? How did we move from data compilations to hypertext and Java? "Technomanifestos" addresses all of these questions and more.
Kicking off with a chapter centered on the writings of Norbert Wiener, father of the theory of Cybernetics, the book is structured around the most well-known figures of the Information Revolution, their respective contributions and their visions of where it would all lead, as seen in their own writings. By no means, however, is it limited to just the movement's technical or computer-based aspects and thinkers. On the contrary, tied in throughout the shrewd exploration of the true significance of today's increased communication possibilities are such famous pop and counter-culture icons as Marshall McLuhan and Abbie Hoffman.
From the origins of digital thought to such modern issues as open source, "Technomanifestos" offers a chronological panorama of what the great minds behind the Information Revolution actually thought.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 20, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Computers have revolutionized our society. Yet most people have little idea of how this happened, who were behind these changes, and what are the issues we still face. This book provides an excellent history of the ideas and the people who changed our lives. I loved the photo inserts of the 20 visionaries the book highlights - from MIT professors in the 1940s in suits and ties, to John von Neumann, Marvin Minsky, and Seymour Papert with their machines, to long-haired Abbie Hoffman, Richard Stallman, and Jaron Lanier. The book is very well written, combining technical details, personal anecdotes, and quotations to give an inspirational overview of how computer technology came to be, and how it effects the world. From information technology to cybernetics to nanotechnology, I learned a lot.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Angelica Kauffmann on January 24, 2005
Format: Hardcover
As someone with no background in computers or information technology, I found Technomanifestos to be a key text. The work not only provided a factual background on the history of computers, programming, and the internet, but also demonstrated the ideologies behind their development. In addition, through an engaging narrative and constant use of non-tech analogy and vocabulary, Adam Brate translates the basics of computer and program development into accessible and digestible language. Most importantly, Technomanifestos encouraged me to relate the politics and polemics of modern technology to my own computer use, newspaper headlines, and the history of knowledge.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Scott Blair on May 22, 2006
Format: Hardcover
It's really interesting to get the background and more importantly the story behind the names that you hear in the circles of technology. Visiting laboratories, and libraries named after people you know about is much more interesting than when you have a little knowledge. Technomanifesto's is a unique compilation of technologies' history, a must read for anyone that considers themself a technophile.
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4 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Polly Gardner on June 16, 2002
Format: Hardcover
As a 75 year old who had 7 children during the years the technomanifestos were being written, this book opened my eyes. I now have some understanding of what led up to my home computer. This is a must read for anyone in my generation, my children, and my grandchildren.
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