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Tecumseh and the Quest for Indian Leadership (Library of American Biography Series) (2nd Edition) Paperback – July 21, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-0321043719 ISBN-10: 0321043715 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Pearson; 2 edition (July 21, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321043715
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321043719
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #321,103 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 19, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is a textbook companion of the author's biography of Tecumseh's brother, Tenskwatawa or the Prophet. R. David Edmunds is known for both his combination of ethnographic material, oral tradition, and traditional historical research with good storytelling. His unique contribution is highlighting the importance of the religious message of revitalization to Indian resistance in the Old Northwest. This book is a good introduction to Indian experiences in the Old Northwest during the Revolutionary and Early Republic Periods. Those really interested in this title may want to continue their reading with "The Shawnee Prophet" by the same author, "A Spirited Resistance" by Gregory Dowd, and "The Middle Ground" by Richard White.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Welker on February 28, 2003
Format: Paperback
I read this book for a college Ohio History class. I hadn't had any previous knowledge about Tecumseh other than he was an Indian leader. Overall it was a very interesting book. Some may run into some problems if they do not fully understand the history of the War of 1812 in Ohio. Some of the battle descriptions go into detail. There is a chapter in the book that describes some of the Shawnee cultures and customs that I found very interesting.
All said, this is a very good biography of a very respected Indian leader.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 7, 1998
Format: Paperback
This book is a good overall view of the life of Tecumseh, the Shawnee chief. Also mentioned are his brother, the Prophet, and important historical events of the time. A good resource for those interested in the subject, a little dry for an everyday read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. Sheppard on December 29, 2009
Format: Paperback
I thought this book provided a good overview of Tecumseh's life and mission. This is a brief biography to be sure, but it is a good introduction to Tecumseh. Those looking for a detailed biography need to look elsewhere.
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Format: Paperback
On one level, this book is yet another iteration of the usual, sad story of continuous European encroachment of Indian lands via broken promises and the various trappings of European "civilization" (especially disease and alcohol) that undermined Native American culture. More specifically, it is the story of one Indian who tried, both intelligently and valiantly, to check the Caucasian tide.

Tecumseh lived from 1768 to 1813. His father was Shawnee; his mother was Creek. He was raised among the Shawnees of Ohio. He came of age after the Revolutionary War, as the young United States expanded gradually but relentlessly beyond the Appalachians into Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois. The prototypical pretense for expansion was a treaty with this or that group of Indians whereby the U.S. gave them money and trade goods in exchange for the right to settle on a vast tract of land that in most cases the Indian group in question did not truly own, at least vis-à-vis all other Indians. Tecumseh was savvy enough to understand the mechanism of American expansion and that it represented a collective problem for Indians who were splintered into numerous tribal groups. So, around 1807, Tecumseh proposed and began to pursue a two-prong policy. First, explicit recognition that all remaining Indian lands (lands not already ceded to the U.S. by one or another treaty, however fraudulent) were owned by all Indians, so that any future transfers of Indian land to the Americans had to be approved by all Indians. In other words, individual tribes no longer had the right to sell what they claimed to be their tribal territory to the government.
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