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Teen 2.0: Saving Our Children and Families from the Torment of Adolescence Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 535 pages
  • Publisher: Quill Driver Books (February 24, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1884995594
  • ISBN-13: 978-1884995590
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #700,465 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

""I heartily believe in the validity of what he is saying. Furthermore, I believe what he is saying to have vast consequences for our society. All of America should take note."" --M. Scott Peck, MD, author, "" The Road Less Traveled""

About the Author

Robert Epstein, PhD, is the former editor in chief of Psychology Today, a contributing editor to Scientific American Mind, and the host of the radio show Psyched! A visiting scholar at the University of California–San Diego and former university research professor at the California School of Professional Psychology, he is the founder and director emeritus of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies and the developer of many parenting, adolescence, and other competency tests. He is the author of many articles and books, including The Big Book of series. He lives in San Diego, California.


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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Mark Oestreicher on May 17, 2010
Format: Paperback
more than any other single book i have read in the past decade, this book has rocked my thinking about youth and youth ministry. epstein's contention -- extremely well documented -- that we "infantilize" teenagers, keeping them in a protracted form of childhood, resonated with me (not that it sits easily, though, or is simple in any way). he claims (and, again, documents) that adolescence as we know it in the states (and, increasingly, in cultures impacted by american adolescent culture and the systems that exist to perpetuate it), does not exist in many, if not most, cultures around the world. we have invented it, and we are lengthening it, keeping teenagers (and now young adults) from living into the adult world that most of them possess the competencies for. the stereotypical brooding, emotionally-volatile, irresponsible, short-sighted teenager is a creation of our own invention. this book will call for a longer post or two from me, i think, than i have space for here. but i'll say this: if i've ever said another book was a must-read for parents and youth workers, ignore that, until you have read this book. i'm already thinking, almost daily, about the implications for my own home (with two teenagers), my small group of 7th grade guys, and the many arenas i have for speaking to and (occasionally) influencing the thinking and practice of youth workers.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A. Prentice on July 8, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
No one will regret reading this book. Even though I'm not that crazy about the title, Epstein's clear writing, extensively research and supported arguments, and reasoned advocacy for young people make it a compelling read. And, although the book iss cholarly, each chapter begins and ends with a summary, so a busy reader can skim those and the many well-utliized charts and graphics to quickly get a sense of Epstein's arguments.

Americans have created a terrible thing: the troubled adolescent. these never existed historically, and are a by-product of our corporate culture, our labor laws, our factory model of education, the media, and a flawed juvenile justice system, among other thngs. He cebrates the many many ways that young people aged 12 to 20 are competent, idealistic, capable, hard-working, romantic, and dependable. And he laments the many ways in which we as a society hold back all these competent human beings. He advocates for competency tests rather than age limits for votng, working (with inlimits), and even marriage.

Epstein writes very well and his affection for the age group he advocates for is palpable. I enjoyed this book very much and it certainly made me think very differently about things I had taken for granted. Always a good thing.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Graciela Elizabeth Uhles on January 20, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Teens in America today have less freedom than prisoners and members of the armed forces. Teen 2.0 calls for a paradigm shift in the way we think about teenagers. He argues that the turbulence we see in modern adolescence doesn't even exist in every cultural around the world. Teenagers want and need meaningful responsibility, as well as positive adult interactions and mentors. The book explains the tension teens live in today, and why teens act the way they do. He argues for recognition of competence in teens in several key areas like love, creativity, and art. The book also includes the young person's bill of rights, and practical tips to finding the adult in your teen.

Teen 2.0 is a must read for youth workers, parents, and anyone who wants to learn about youth today.

[...]
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Brian Sorgatz on December 19, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a 38-year-old who quakes with anger every day at the memory of his teen years, I cannot overstate the importance of Dr. Epstein's book. I'm usually not much of an activist or philanthropist, but I've been giving away free copies of this book at the nearest public high school. I have to do it for my own mental health. Anyone who laughs along with the poster that reads "Hire a teenager while they still know everything" ought to be ashamed. With copious facts and sound logic, "Teen 2.0" reveals the condescending bigotry behind that statement. My only significant problem with Epstein's thesis is his tarring of the entertainment industry as one of the forces oppressing America's youth. As a rule, entertainment consumers are never victims. Young people are no more the victims of "Dude, Where's My Car?" and "Jackass" than old people are the victims of "Murder, She Wrote" and "60 Minutes." (To understand the liberating power of consumer culture, I recommend Charles Paul Freund's essay "In Praise of Vulgarity" in "Choice: The Best of Reason.") Still, I give "Teen 2.0" five stars without hesitation.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on May 16, 2010
Format: Paperback
If you ask any teenager, there's nothing worse than being a teenager. "Teen 2.0: Saving Our Children and Families from the Torment of Adolescence" is a guide for parents in dealing with the unique questions and challenges that comes with raising a teenager in today's world of high technology and changing social attitudes. It also discusses the challenges facing today's teens, and how much of the fear and paranoia of society has made being a teen truly the worse thing to be. "Teen 2.0" is insightful and intriguing with much to think about.
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