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Tell It All: The Story of a Life's Experience in Mormonism Hardcover – Large Print, February 1, 2011


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 668 pages
  • Publisher: Kessinger Publishing, LLC (February 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1169908535
  • ISBN-13: 978-1169908536
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.5 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Born in England in 1829, the author of ""Tell It All"" married American newspaperman T.B.H. Stenhouse, an elder of the Mormon Church and practicing polygamist. T.B.H. later became dissatisfied with some of the faith's practices. He and Fanny would eventually withdraw from the church. With her husband's support and encouragement, as well as a growing interest from the public, Fanny wrote her ""true history by a real Mormon woman.""
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 9 customer reviews
I would suggest this for anyone interested in American history and religion.
A Customer
May we learn from the lesson she does her utmost to teach...and Fanny, wherever you are...THANK YOU.
J. M. Bradshaw
This book is excellent when it comes to the masterful use of the English language.
Marsena Cook

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 18, 2000
Format: Library Binding
In this work, Fanny Stenhouse reveals her life as a Mormon woman living in Utah during the middle part of the 19th century. Her experiences as a young convert and then first wife of an Elder are vividly captured and come alive even a century later. I was especially intrigued by the descriptions of her every day life and opinions as a woman living through a very difficult period of American pioneer history. She is very well written and expresses her opinions movingly. I would suggest this for anyone interested in American history and religion.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 18, 2000
Format: Library Binding
In this work, Fanny Stenhouse reveals her life as a Mormon woman living in Utah during the middle part of the 19th century. Her experiences as a young convert and then first wife of an Elder are vividly captured and come alive even a century later. I was especially intrigued by the descriptions of her every day life and opinions as a woman living through a very difficult period of American pioneer history. She is very well written and expresses her opinions movingly. I would suggest this for anyone interested in American history and religion.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By GYPSY THE STEGOSAURUS TOP 500 REVIEWER on September 23, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Heartbreaking and eye-opening. Keep in mind that in those days, (1800's) not only was our language, grammar, and word choices different, most women were not educated. I do not know in this situation what Fanny's education was. I am certain it wasn't much past primary school. There are typo's. There are word choices and grammar that are not familiar, but either that's how it was done in the "day" or it was because she had limited education. Either way, it is what it is. Do not review or complain about that--its the CONTENT that is what you are reading this for. This is something no one talks about, and is just a hidden but sad part of what is supposed to be this "revelation" ---plural marriage or whatever you wish to call it, I call it sick because of the way it was thrust upon the unwitting and other wise unwilling victims.
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11 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Marsena Cook on May 18, 2001
Format: Library Binding
This book is excellent when it comes to the masterful use of the English language. It touchingly describes the desire of a woman to seek God with all her heart--and how she was sidetracked and deceived by Mormonism. This book reveals the truth about the origins and history of Mormonism that you don't see in the nice TV ads depicting ideal Mormon families. Its origins and history--then and now--are steeped in bigamy, incest, murder, oppression of women, the occult and other false teachings. It was thrilling to read the author's personal account of what she suffered during that time, and how she and her family finally left that false religion and returned to the worship of the TRUE and LIVING God. Every Mormon should read it, and I think they would see frightening parallels between their church history and the present deceptions that are still going on. If people needed to be on guard with their Bibles in Fanny Stenhouse's era, we must be even more vigilant in its study TODAY so we will not be deceived.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By esplicito con beige on July 6, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Fanny Stenhouse was an early feminist. "One of the younger members of a large family," she writes, "when I thought of the future I readily saw that if I desired a position in life I should have to make it for myself; and this I resolved to do." Yet her ambitions fall to pieces when, barely more than a child, she falls in love with a Mormon missionary and with his church. This choice-- if one can label as such the compulsion to follow our hearts and minds-- will lead her down a road of hunger, suffering and heartbreak.

Fanny converted to the church around 1850, a mere 20 years after Joseph Smith, Jr. established it in New York, and her memoir traces out a lot of early church history from the first missionary efforts in Europe, to the pioneers' trudge across the plains with their oxen and handcarts, to the Mountain Meadows Massacre, to the political intrigues surrounding Brigham Young's dictatorship in Utah. Absolute power corrupts absolutely. If you are practicing LDS, you will find much to be offended at here-- the Mormon despot, she calls Young, "a tyrant in both spiritual and worldly matters," who has "at the same time debased and enslaved (the) souls" of his followers.

But the true target of Fanny's rage is polygamy, which entered into Mormon theology in 1843 when Joseph Smith received divine revelation identifying it as a "new and everlasting covenant" between God and his chosen people, much like the covenant God made with Moses when he led the Jews out of Egypt. Church leaders practiced polygamy in secret for the next ten years, misleading new converts like Fanny, before publicly embracing the practice in 1852. At this point most Mormon women, at Fanny's telling, dreaded and feared polygamy, yet submitted out of the sincere belief that God had commanded it.
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