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53 of 58 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars highly entertaining and well-written
Cammie Morgan is your typical student at the Gallagher Academy for Exceptional Young Women. She takes the same classes, and she has the same ambition: to become a spy. Under the guise of a school for rich geniuses, the Gallagher Academy is really a spy academy for exceptional young women. And exceptional they are. Martial arts black belts, fluency in fourteen...
Published on September 11, 2006 by Alexandra

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28 of 31 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars YA Lit Gets High-Tech Makeover
When my little sister handed me this book and told me to read it, I took one look at the cover and gave her a look that said, "you must be kidding me." I like YA literature and will even pick up the occasional "fluff" book, but this? This was too much and thus it sat on my nightstand for about a month before I gave it a chance. Surprisingly clever and enjoyable, this book...
Published on April 23, 2009 by Lindsay Johnson


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53 of 58 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars highly entertaining and well-written, September 11, 2006
By 
Cammie Morgan is your typical student at the Gallagher Academy for Exceptional Young Women. She takes the same classes, and she has the same ambition: to become a spy. Under the guise of a school for rich geniuses, the Gallagher Academy is really a spy academy for exceptional young women. And exceptional they are. Martial arts black belts, fluency in fourteen languages, and expert hacking abilities are simply par for the course if you're a Gallagher Girl. Sophomore year is when the students start their first field work, in Covert Operations (CoveOps to those in the know) class. Cammie and her friends are thrilled that they're finally getting real experience. Then Cammie takes on a covert operation of her own. Out one night she meets a boy -- and falls for him. Unfortunately, he's an ordinary boy, and Cammie's no ordinary girl. Unable to tell him who she really is, she uses all her skills to track him and accidently-on-purpose bump into him. But is that enough? In a school where final exams involve being kidnapped, Cammie is about to get her most challenging assignment: transforming herself into a normal girl to date a normal boy. Quick-witted, clever, and poignant, this story is as interesting as any CoveOps assignment, with a cast of characters that makes it unforgettable.
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28 of 31 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars YA Lit Gets High-Tech Makeover, April 23, 2009
By 
This review is from: I'd Tell You I Love You, But Then I'd Have to Kill You (Gallagher Girls) (Paperback)
When my little sister handed me this book and told me to read it, I took one look at the cover and gave her a look that said, "you must be kidding me." I like YA literature and will even pick up the occasional "fluff" book, but this? This was too much and thus it sat on my nightstand for about a month before I gave it a chance. Surprisingly clever and enjoyable, this book is written from the perspective of Cammie Morgan, student at the Gallagher Academy for Exceptional Young Women (she also happens to be the headmistress's daughter). However, this is no ordinary school, it happens to be educating the next generation of super spies (think Mission: Impossible meets Harry Potter . . . with a female protagonist). As Cammie and her friends try to successfully navigate the new girl, challenging classes, and fourteen different languages, Cammie is thrown a curve ball that takes her out of her comfort zone when she gains a male admirer on the outside.

Carter has created a cast of likable characters and breathed new life into an overdone teen literary genre by giving it a new, high-tech twist. The plot is not complex, but it is compelling - admittedly I steamrolled through this book in two days. Moreover, I am always glad to see books on the shelves that contain intelligent, independent young women destined to be extraordinary in a world that seems to encourage mediocrity. The "Gallagher Academy created everything" from velcro to duct tape line gets a little old and repetitive, yes we get it you are a bunch of spy geniuses, but all in all it's a nice breezy read with a good premise. The next book in the series is currently sitting on my nightstand, but this time I can say with certainty it will not take me a whole month to dive in.
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41 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too, April 20, 2006
Welcome to The Gallagher Academy for Exceptional Young Women, an all-girls school located just outside of Roseville, Virginia. Anyone looking at this elite private boarding school would see just what The Gallagher Academy wants you to see--a preppy school for privileged girls, complete with a guardhouse and stone wall to keep the curious away from their precious charges. And they'd be right, of course, and yet they would be so very, very wrong!

Because The Gallagher Academy isn't exactly what it appears to be. It's an elite school, that's for sure, and the only boys who grace its grounds are the male teachers. After that, though, the similarities between The Gallagher Academy and every other elite boarding school in the world ends. Instead of math and reading, English and horseback-riding, the girls who attend this school take courses in Covert Operations, Ancient Languages, Countries of the World, Culture and Assimilation, and Protection and Enforcement. The Gallagher Academy is, in a word, a school for spies.

Cammie Morgan is a second-generation Gallagher girl--her mother, who also attended the school, is now the headmistress. Her two best friends, Liz and Bex, are both super-smart, and the best spies-in-training she knows (except for Liz's lack of coordination, but that's another story). Cammie has spent most of her life inside the walls of The Gallagher Academy, and now that another semester is starting, complete with new CoveOps teacher, hunky Joe Solomon, she's really looking forward to the new school year.

But then things start to get a little out of control. Mr. Solomon seems to know all about Cammie's missing-and-presumed-dead father. She meets a boy in town, Josh, who finally sees her, really sees her, like no one else ever has. After all, she didn't get her nickname, "the chameleon," for nothing. But now Cammie is balancing on a dangerous ledge--knowing that no one outside of the gates of The Gallagher Academy can ever know who she truly is, and wanting nothing more than to spill all of her secrets to Josh.

As lies tangle with truths, as first love duels with obligation, Cammie will need to learn exactly what it means to be a spy, her mother's daughter, and a young girl falling in love.

I'D TELL YOU I LOVE YOU, BUT THEN I'D HAVE TO KILL YOU is a wonderful, laugh-out-loud, action-adventure extravaganza. Filled with plenty of cool gadgets, intriguing teachers, and heart-pounding first-love moments to keep the reader interested, you won't be able to put this book down once you start. A true winner, and I definitely can't wait for a sequel!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I wanna be a spy, June 26, 2010
This review is from: I'd Tell You I Love You, But Then I'd Have to Kill You (Gallagher Girls) (Paperback)
Okay, I was never expecting much from this book, especially after I saw that it had been optioned for a film by Disney. But I was hoping for some James Bond/Cody Banks/Spy Kids action.

This book is about Cammie Morgan, a student at the elite Gallagher Academy, which is essentially an all-girl school for spies. Cammie is a pretty normal student at Gallagher, besides the fact that her mother is the headmistress, and she has a reputation for being "the Chameleon." Cammie knows fourteen languages and how to kill a man with a piece of uncooked spaghetti, but when it comes to boys, she's clueless. However, some boy advice will come in handy when she starts up a secret relationship with a normal boy- who thinks she is just a normal girl.

This book was cute. Nothing more than that. It had some humor, not enough to make me laugh out loud, but enough to keep the mood light. That's the thing, I thought this book was TOO light. I never really bought in to any conflict. Don't you think in a book about spies, there should be some bad guys? Essentially, this book is about a girl who meets a boy. The spy stuff is just kind of tacked on. Cammie seemed more like a normal girl than a genius. But she did have a level head on her shoulders. But of course, all her friends wer super-model gorgeous while she is average looking. And she is the one with the boyfriend. Right. The characters and plot were all just a bit bland for me. Not much action to speak of. That was a tad disappointing. But there was some genuine guy advice, which readers will appreciate.

I don't know. It's cute, light, and I'm sure tweenage girls will eat it up. I won't read the sequels though unless they fall into my hands.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great fun for ALL ages!!, March 29, 2009
By 
Grace (Washington) - See all my reviews
This review is from: I'd Tell You I Love You, But Then I'd Have to Kill You (Gallagher Girls) (Paperback)
My mom, older sister and I all LOVED this book. It has action, suspense, humor, and romance. It is hard to put down, and will keep you laughing from cover to cover. It is very well written and the second book is just as good, if not better. I can't wait for the third book, "Don't Judge a Girl by Her Cover", to come out. It is being released on June 9th, and my mom called dibs on reading it first.
"I'd Tell You I Love You, But Then I'd Have to Kill You" is very well written, and also very clean. It is one of the most innocent teen books I have EVER read. Read it, read it, read it!!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Love and Crime!, August 29, 2007
This review is from: I'd Tell You I Love You, But Then I'd Have to Kill You (Gallagher Girls) (Paperback)
This was Alias meets high school. Cameron Morgan is a Gallagher Girl. Translation, she's being trained to be a spy at her private school. She and her other soon-to-be-licensed-to-kill gal pals speak in multiple language, have been using roundhouse kicks for years, and absolutely don't know how to act around normal boys. To make it even worse, Cameron's mother is the principal of said school and so her problems are multiplied. Of course, Cameron meets a normal boy and can't tell him who she really is.

She finds herself on a tight balance, trying to date her hottie and do well in classes such as CoveOps, where she learns to trail people successfully on the DL. Her friends all call her the Chameleon for obvious reasons. What she really loves about her new boypal is that he seems to notice her, whereas usually she has been taught to blend in to the background.

There is a town vs. gown kind of rivalry going on, as well. The townie folk don't trust those Gallagher Girls. They are thought to be snooty and rich. While the Gallagher Girls are for the most part wealthy, they certainly aren't snooty, just can't reveal who they really are to most people. So Cammie has to pretend she is NOT a Gallagher Girl, causing her to tell lie after lie. You know she is going to be caught eventually, but you sympathize because this is her first boyfriend.

There are a lot of funny moments: the girls get ready dressed up for the CoveOps class (the teacher is really hot) only to find themselves facing the creepier paranoid chemistry teacher. I also laughed out loud as said boyfriend drove a forklift into a building while Cammie is performing a simulated heist. He thinks she is being kidnapped. I also enjoyed when they learn how to learn dirt on people through what is in someone's trash. Next thing you know, Cammie, Bex, and the other girls are looking through the boy's trash collecting notes and candy wrappers like they are evidence.

It is an enjoyable read for girls that are sick of the whole Clique or Gossip Girl scene. These are REAL girls with REAL problems (dead parents, how to tell if a boy likes you, choosing your friends over boys). It also had humor reminiscent of Kiki Strike. The girls are feeling bonded as they connect themselves to rappelling cables.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Light. Fun. A great gift for a tween., January 7, 2009
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: I'd Tell You I Love You, But Then I'd Have to Kill You (Gallagher Girls) (Paperback)
I really struggled this season while shopping for a book to give as a gift to a 12-year old girl. A lot of books for the 9-12 crowd seemed geared toward the young end of the spectrum, but the books I looked at that are aimed at young adults seemed a little "too adult" for what I had in mind. This book was perfect. It is age appropriate, but more importantly it is just good fun. An elite boarding school full of young girls training to be spies? Genius.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Malory Towers Meets Charlie's Angels!, June 4, 2012
By 
M. Lee (Long Beach, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: I'd Tell You I Love You, But Then I'd Have to Kill You (Gallagher Girls) (Paperback)
As a mother who screens everything her 13-year-old daughter reads, I had been holding Ally Carter's "I'd Tell You I Love You, But Then I'd Have to Kill You" and "Cross my Heart and Hope to Spy" in storage for a long time now - the blurbs and the cover pictures suggested a cross between Malory Towers and St. Trinian's - and I was quite sure my then-nine-year-old daughter was not quite ready for the exploits of a group of teenaged Charlie's Angels. Now, however, said daughter knows well enough that (a) lying is never a good idea, spy or no spy; and (b) her parents are *her* best go-to in problematic situations. I felt particularly good that said daughter had just finished and enjoyed Leo Tolstoy's "War and Peace", and so when it was referenced in "Id' Tell You ...", she knew exactly what the reference was. (I am quite honestly a little tired of references to "Jane Eyre", "Wuthering Heights" and "Pride and Prejudice" in other middle-school books, especially since they're *all* classics written by women about other women.)

As far as the "Gallagher Girls" series, I thought the first two books were fun reads - a great kick-start to our summer reading schedule. I am not as much of a fan of the two books as said daughter, who, as can be seen from her very positive review below, really enjoyed the spy-caper - and I have not read books 3-5 in the series - but I rate Book 1, at least, fairly highly because I appreciate that parents are not total write-offs in the story. In fact, I really liked how the author handled the mother-daughter relationship in the book. Nice one! Said daughter's review follows:

"The book 'I'd Tell You I Love You, But Then I'd Have to Kill You' by Ally Carter is a book that I have wanted to read for a few years now. However, my mum always said that it was *way* too adult for an almost-ten-year-old. Now that I'm thirteen, I am glad to say that I *have* read the book - and it was just as good as I have been imagining it would be.

"Cammie Morgan is a student at the Gallagher Academy for Exceptional Young Women, a school she's known all her life - after all, her mother *is* the principal, and Cammie has known every secret passage and hidden staircase in the school her whole life, some of which even her mum doesn't know about! :-) However, Gallagher Academy isn't actually a posh school for girls, as most people believe - it's an all-girls spy school that teaches its students how to use a Barbie doll as a weapon, has teachers who are wanted in seven countries, and requires you to speak a different language at lunch every day. But even though Cammie can hack into the CIA, kill a person with a rolled-up magazine and create a bomb in 57 seconds, can she figure out how to have a relationship with an ordinary boy who will never know the truth about her? Or will she be left with a broken heart and a *lot* of explaining to do?

"My favorite character was definitely Cammie. I love how she handled everything that was thrown her way - and, trust me, there was a *lot* of throwing going on. I also liked how Cammie and her mum had lunch together every week - but the food was always burnt or messed up! :-) However, if Gallagher Academy could be considered a character, then I really liked it too. I would *love* to go to spy school - even if I can't say a word of Swahili. Actually, I really liked all the characters - except, of course, Cammie's new boyfriend and his idiotic friends.

"My favorite part would have to be the ending. However, my mum says I can't do any spoilers because how-would-I-like-it-if-someone-told-me-how-The-Heroes-of-Olympus_ended, so all I can say is, the ending was *perfect*.

"I also, the same time I got this book, got the second book in the series, "Cross My Heart and Hope to Spy." Personally, I think that it was better than the first book. The plot was better, there was more action, and Cammie behaved more like a real girl than a, well, girl spy. However, this book was still totally awesome.

"I would give the book five stars: two stars for the characters, two stars for the plot, and one star for Gallagher Academy itself - the best spy school ever! :-) "
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 3 Stars, September 12, 2014
I love when I go into an audiobook not expecting a lot. I find that low expectations really help me enjoy a book more. And that’s exactly what happened with I’d Tell You I Love You, But Then I’d Have to Kill You. I ended up starting this book when I did because of the length. It was a fairly short book and I wanted something I could finish quickly. As it turns out, this book was really enjoyable and even kind of funny at times. I don’t know that I’ll have much to say about it though.

Cammie was a decent heroine. She’s like royalty at the Gallagher Academy for Exceptional Young Women (aka spy school for girls). Everyone knows who she is both because her mother is head mistress and because everyone knows how her father died on a mission. She’s a great student and as far as spy stuff goes, she’s called “the Chameleon” because she blends into the background when she wants. She’s developed this skill over the years and she’s become used to being looked over, around, and through even if she is notorious. But when Josh, a local teen boy, actually sees Cammie she can’t get him out of her mind. Thus Cammie and her friends set out to investigate Josh to ensure he’s who he says he is.

Cammie’s cluelessness about boys and regular teenage life is exactly what pulled me in for this book. This is where the humor came in and was the best thing I’d Tell You I Love You, But Then I’d Have to Kill You had going for it. At one part I literally laughed out loud. I just wasn’t expecting to laugh out loud which made it all the more funny to me. I wish that humor was just a bit more present throughout though. That probably would have bumped it up another notch for me because I do love a book that can make me laugh out loud.

Josh was endearing. I loved the fact that where so many others passed Cammie by, Josh zeroed in on her. He saw her. And he was everything a first crush needs to be. At the same time, I really liked Cammie’s friends too, Liz and Bex. They rounded out the story nicely.

I’d Tell You I Love You, But Then I’d Have to Kill You was an easy, lighthearted, and fun read listen for me. It wasn’t earth-shattering in any way. But if you’re looking for something light and fun that might even cause you to laugh out loud, then check this one out. It kind of reminded me of Carter Finally Gets It, but Carter was a bit more laugh-out-loud for me. I’m interested in checking out the other books in this series, but not to the point of hunting them down or “I have to read the next book immediately.” So we’ll just have to see what happens.

I’d Tell You I Love You, But Then I’d Have to Kill You gets 3 Stars from me. Have you read I’d Tell You I Love You, But Then I’d Have to Kill You? What did you think? Let me know!

For more book reviews, check out Somewhere Only We Know - http://sandyfarmer.blogspot.com.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for daughters and mothers!, August 15, 2007
By 
Leslie (California) - See all my reviews
This is a smart, well written book. Not a lot of gratuitous malice. Even the details are well researched and interesting. I don't know why this book hasn't been picked up as a television show yet. Daughters from about 7 to 15 will enjoy this book and if mothers want to know what's being read, they can enjoy it too, it's that interesting.
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I'd Tell You I Love You, But Then I'd Have to Kill You (Gallagher Girls)
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