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Tell No One


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Product Details

  • Actors: Kristin Scott Thomas, Francois Cluzet
  • Directors: Guillame Canet
  • Format: Anamorphic, Color, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: French, English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Dubbed: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Music Box Films
  • DVD Release Date: March 31, 2009
  • Run Time: 125 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (198 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001D5C1GW
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #139,240 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Tell No One" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Based on Harlan Coben s International best selling novel, Tell No One tells the story of pediatrician Alexandre Beck who still grieves the murder of his beloved wife, Margot, eight years earlier. When two bodies are uncovered near where Margot's body was found, the police reopen the case and Alex becomes a suspect again. The mystery deepens when Alex receives an anonymous e-mail with a link to a video clip that seems to suggest Margot is somehow still alive and a message to Tell No One .

One of the Best Reviewed Films of the Year! (Rotten Tomatoes - 96% among top critics)

2008 Top 10 List Selections:
-Entertainment Weekly Owen Gleiberman
-New York Times Stephen Holden
-Los Angeles Times Kenneth Turran
-USA Today - Susan Wloszczyna
-Metacritic.com #1 - Marc Boyle
-Plus over 10 others (Washington Post, Oregonian, Newark Star Ledger, Seattle Times, Austin Chronicle, etc.)

Bonus Features:
Deleted Scenes
Outtakes
English Language Track
English Subtitles

Amazon.com

Based on the book by American author Harlan Coben, this French suspense thriller is one of those exhilarating word-of-mouth gems one can't to tell everyone about. Francois Cluzet stars as Alex, a pediatrician whose beloved wife, Margot (Marie-Josee Croze) was shockingly murdered eight years before. As the anniversary of her death approaches, Alex begins to receive cryptic emails and a video that seems to suggest that she is alive. The discovery of two long-buried bodies at the crime scene turn Alex into some kind of Hitchcockian Everyman, implicated in a crime he could not possibly have committed. But when he makes a mad dash from the police who visit him at his office, he seems to have signed his own confession. This synopsis doesn't even begin to hint at the genuinely exciting and surprising twists, turns, and revelations that await Alex in this Chinese box of a mystery. Brilliantly acted by an ensemble that includes Kristin Scott Thomas and French movie icon Jean Rochefort (Pardon Mon Affaire), Tell No One invites repeat viewings, the better to appreciate the intricacies of its plotting and construction. And if you think you have it figured out, there's this from one character who tells Alex at a climactic point, "Wait, there's more." --Donald Liebenson

Customer Reviews

The acting was very good.
Michele H.
The ending was a surprise and the film does well with the development of the characters.
Robin V. Schenck
This is a suspense movie that will keep you guessing until the very end.
Lynn S. Williams

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
This is a very exciting thriller, in the tradition of American films like The Fugitive, but with a unique edge that makes it distinctively French and deliciously diabolical. It is certainly darker (and funnier) than The Fugitive, but it is no accident that there is an American feel, since it is based on a book by Harlan Coben.

Eight years after his wife's brutal murder, new clues emerge that lead police to once again suspect that Alexander Beck may have killed her. At the same time, he begins to think she may be still alive, and is frantic to find her before he is arrested as a suspect for another related homicide. Director Guillaume Canet keeps you guessing as the plot thickens, revealing bits and pieces of the past as new circumstances help Beck to see that he didn't know his wife as well as he had thought.

The film looks great, with editing and camera work that helps to achieve a perfect balance of subtle tension and intensity. The performances are all very strong -- and there is a surprisingly intense performance by a bit player, a determined and remorseless tall and skinny female assassin/torture expert, that still haunts me. In fact, I would go as far as to say that her performance created one of the most frightening villians I've seen on the screen in a long time -- even more than the performance of Javier Bardem as Chigurh in No Country for Old Men -- because it was just as intense but more plausible. Definitely recommended for lovers of French Cinema, but also for those who think that French films tend to be too cerebral and cannot deliver the thrills. This one hits you in both the brain and the gut.
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56 of 63 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 20, 2008
Format: DVD
TELL NO ONE (Ne le dis à personne) succeeds on every level for this viewer. Based on Harlan Coben's novel and adapted for the screen and directed by Guillaume Canet, this is one of those intricately complex French films that is much in the same mode as the 1955 film LES DIABOLIQUES. Nothing is as it appears at first and even when the mystery is explained in what appears to be a systematic, cohesive manner, the 'real story' remains a conundrum. It is a brilliant little film well worth multiple viewings to fully appreciate all of the aspects of the fine acting, cinematography, direction and musical scoring.

In a misty opening we discover Alexandre Beck (François Cluzet) and his beautiful wife Margot (Marie-Josée Croze) only to abruptly be drawn into the murder of Margot and the beating of Alexandre. The incidents are shrouded in mystery and remain so for eight years when suddenly the now pediatrician Alexandre receives an email from the 'deceased' Margot. Alexandre's world is topsy turvy and he begins to share the strange incident with his family - his sister Anne (Marina Hines) and her lover Hélène (a radiant Kristin Scott Thomas), his father, Margot's family...and the police who begin to discover evidence that implicates Alexandre as the perpetrator. Alexandre's lawyer (Nathalie Baye) pits evidence against the police investigators while Alexandre's chief ally in his run from the accusers is Bruno (Gilles Lellouche), the father of a hemophiliac patient whom Alexandre has treated and befriended. The chase is on and the clues become increasingly puzzling until at last the truth of the now eight year old murder and all of the implications of that event unfold.
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Format: DVD
Says Roger Ebert: "Here is how a thriller should be made."
Says Stephen Holden of the New York Times: "I watched it twice. It was even better the second time."
Says me: "I couldn't agree more with them." Tell No One, even without the quotes, is one of the best thrillers I've seen in a long, long time.

Alexander Beck and his wife, Margot, both much in love, have gone for a bit of evening skinny-dipping in the country. There's a minor disagreement and she dives back in from the float and heads to the shore. He hears her cry out and swims as swiftly as he can after her. When he reaches the small dock and starts to pull himself out, he's met by a baseball bat. While he's in a coma for three days his wife is found dead with severe bruising and cuts, the marks of a known serial killer. But who pulled Beck out of the water? Who called for emergency medical help?

Eight years later Dr. Alex Beck, a pediatrician, is told by the police that the remains of two unidentified male bodies have been found in the vicinity of where his wife was murdered. Then he receives an e-mail on his computer. The attachment shows a woman leaving a crowded exit. She pauses and looks at the security camera. The picture is fuzzy. The scene ends. Beck has never remarried and still is haunted by the memory of his wife. He is almost sure this woman is she. The message in the e-mail says, "Tell no one. They're watching."

The director and co-screenwriter Guillaume Canet has taken the novel by Harlan Coben and, working with Coben, has fashioned a film at least as good as the novel. The film has been crafted with care. You'd best pay attention to every moment. Irrelevant items turn out to be relevant.
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