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Telling Lies: Clues to Deceit in the Marketplace, Politics, and Marriage Paperback – January 26, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Revised Edition edition (January 26, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393337456
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393337457
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (90 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #16,943 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“[A] wealth of detailed, practical information about lying and lie detection and a penetrating analysis of the ethical implications.” (Jerome D. Frank, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine)

“[An] accurate, intelligent, informative, and thoughtful work that is accessible to the layman and scientist alike.” (Carol Z. Malatesta - New York Times Book Review)

“Intriguing.” (Kirkus Reviews)

About the Author

Paul Ekman, director of Paul Ekman Group, is the author of Emotions Revealed, Emotional Awareness (coauthored with the Dalai Lama), and twelve other books. The FOX series Lie to Me is based on his research. A professor emeritus at the University of California, San Francisco, he lives in the Bay area.

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Customer Reviews

Great read for anyone that has to deal with other people on a daily basis.
Amazon Customer
This book, though different that his emotions book, is still very informative and interesting.
Steven
All in all, this book is very good at describing his lie detection science.
Susan C. Gill

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

215 of 220 people found the following review helpful By Wm Hawthorne on January 24, 2005
Format: Paperback
Dr Eckman may disappoint his readers by not giving them what they want: A simple protocol for determining whether or not someone is lying. There is a simple reason: There isn't one.

Other books will defraud the reader by giving them techniques that in reality don't work. Dr Eckman pounds in one central point - that there is no one single way to detect dishonesty. He calls any belief to the contrary "the Brokaw Hazard," named after Tom Brokaw, who believes that circumlocution is the omnipresent sentinel of a lie. He also develops the concept of the "Othello Error," that cautions the reader against actually causing lie signals by accident (named after the literary Othello, who assumed that his wife's sobbing was for her lover, but in reality she was sobbing because of her husband's rage over the incorrectly presumed affair.). He gives many tips, including a checklist in an appendix that might help the reader to detect lies, but most of the material is embedded deep within the text. He helps the reader to develop a dynamic approach to detecting lies; approaches that are developed as detection begins. He exhorts the reader to use NUMEROUS well-defined clues to develop the case for the conclusion that someone is lying.

The biggest flaw in the book is on its cover. The cover suggests that this is a practical book. It is more of a research paper. This is what makes it reliable - the fact that such a complete study is contained within. But the average reader will look for a standard protocol for detecting lies - but the Brokaw Hazard tells us there is none.
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154 of 167 people found the following review helpful By Susan C. Gill on March 25, 2009
Format: Paperback
As I've said in my other reviews, I am not Susan Gill, I'm her son.

Dr. Ekman's work on lie detection has been getting a lot of attention lately, due to the fact his science is regularly practiced on Fox's new show Lie to me. The producers even asked him to be their scientific consultant and have put on a quite impressive display of how effective Ekman's study really is.
Alright, first off, the problems. Dr. Ekman has a notorious habit in the entire book for stating that his science is, "inconclusive" and "still has a lot of faults" and that he`s not sure about this, or that. In other words, he tries to come off like there is no real way of knowing if his science works or not, and if it`s a real practical way of catching deciet. This is mostly because he focuses on "deception clues" instead of "deception leakage" which are two entirely different things to look for in a person when looking for deceit (don't worry he describes both in detail, although deception clues in more detail). But the truth is, it does work, and it works very effectively when used correctly. The reason he keeps saying it's inconclusive is because he wrote well over half of this book in `85, way back when he didn't have funds for research on his study. However, if you get the updated version to `01 or even better `08, then he begins to write that his work is much more conclusive than before, and that using facial reading with body language, you are well over 90 % accurate in your lie detection (and concealed emotions reading) ability.
One more complaint that I have is that it seems he shouldn't have written the book himself. It can be a very tough read at points, sometimes having so many technical terms it's hard to keep up, so if you're looking for really easy reading, this book isn't for you.
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226 of 248 people found the following review helpful By Moises I. Orozco on May 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
The title of this book suggests a practical approach: "Clues to deceit in the marketplace, politics and marriage". However the actual content is very different. Thorough the whole book the author mainly explains the results of some experiments he has done at the university. The results are interesting but non practical at all. Actually, it seems to me that the main conclusion of the book is that there are no reliable methods or tests to find out if someone is lying. The references to marriage, politics and the marketplace are just anecdotical and non substantial to the book.
I am not saying that the book is not interesting. What I'm saying is that the title is deceiving and seems to be only a marketing strategy to make it attractive to more people. That is not exactly honest, specially for a book dealing with lies and deceit.
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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By John M. Ford TOP 1000 REVIEWER on April 1, 2010
Format: Paperback
Paul Ekman's classic book on how to tell when someone is lying has been issued in a third edition which includes his more recent research. Made popular by the Fox TV show "Lie to Me," this book documents the line of research used, not only by the show, but by Secret Service, police, jealous spouses and a host of others who want to be better at detecting lies. New material includes how to identify the facial expressions indicating that someone is likely to become violent.

Ekman points out that we often look for the wrong things when trying to detect deception. Even much of the information he has reviewed in training materials for job interviewers, jury selection, and other deception detection professionals is just plain wrong. The hard part about lying effectively is not concealing information, it is concealing the emotions the liar feels while lying. Guilt, fear and even the "duping delight" a clever liar feels when getting away with a falsehood can provide clues obvious to a trained observer. While Ekman acknowledges the value of verbal slips and body language cues, his research reveals the greater value of focusing on facial expressions, particularly "microexpressions" that are displayed and quickly concealed. He teaches readers to identify and interpret them.

Some of the interesting points the book makes as it teaches us to catch liars in the act:

- We should avoid the "Brokaw Hazard" of assuming someone is lying because their speech seems evasive or convoluted. Some people just speak this way, lying or not.
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