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Tempest

September 11, 2012 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
1
5:43
2
3:27
3
7:28
4
3:46
5
5:09
6
7:15
7
5:14
8
9:05
9
13:54
10
7:25


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: September 7, 2012
  • Release Date: September 7, 2012
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:08:26
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0094U0RJQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (475 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,330 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Good album and songs make you think.
PeteHels
A must have if you love Dylan and a good buy even if somehow you've never listened to a Dylan album before.
Adam T. Tremper
One of the best songs on this album!
Mets Fan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

175 of 191 people found the following review helpful By Jack Tripper VINE VOICE on September 11, 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
There's been no singer-songwriter in the near 60-year history of rock music who's a better storyteller than Bob Dylan. He proved it with his (now legendary) humble folk beginnings, and he continues to prove it today, as evidenced by the very dark, very epic 'Tempest,' an album that can proudly stand next to the best of his post-'Blood on the Tracks' repertoire.

After a somewhat lean 1980's and even leaner early-mid 90's as far as quality output from Dylan, he's now in the midst of a pretty remarkable 15-year renaissance beginning with 1997's near-perfect 'Time Out of Mind.' Every album in that span has been extremely well-received and critically-acclaimed--with only '09's 'Together Through Life' receiving even the mildest of criticisms--and I have a pretty strong feeling this trend will continue with his latest. As someone who's been slightly burnt-out on Dylan over the past few years, I think it's safe to say he won't be coming out of my rotation anytime in the foreseeable future.

Right out of the gate his larynx sounds utterly destroyed on the swingin,' country-jukebox dance-floor number, "Duquesne Whistle," but that doesn't take anything away from the song. In fact, it adds a certain kind of charm, giving Dylan a swagger that's been wholly earned through his 50 years of musical storytelling and lessons. His voice is one that demands to be listened to--now as much as ever. And I dare you to stay still in your seat during this track.

After bringing it down a notch with the tender ballad, "Soon After Midnight," Dylan kicks it back into first with the rowdy Chicago blues stomp of "Narrow Way," and when his weary, gravelly voice spouts "It's a long road, it's a long and narrow way," you believe him wholeheartedly.
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50 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Lost John on October 4, 2012
Format: Audio CD
It seems possible that Bob Dylan will gain new fans with this album. Roll on John, the last track, is a highly accessible tribute to John Lennon, mixing-in some lines closely associated with John both as a solo artist and as one of the Beatles. The tune too, and Bob's rendering of it on piano are reminiscent of John's style. The track before that, Tempest, about the sinking of the Titanic, also has easy appeal through its theme and a tune that reflects the triumph of "All the lords and ladies heading for the eternal shore". The tune of course also serves to counterpoint the tragedy of those who "drowned upon the staircase of brass and polished gold" and the "dead bodies floating in the double bottomed hull".

Now you've got a taste for it, start the CD from the beginning and enjoy Duquesne Whistle, with its distinctive old-style intro and an absolutely first rate shuffle arrangement that clearly the musicians themselves found a lot of fun. Continue to Soon After Midnight, a gentle ballad with some truly beautiful words, and some that might puzzle at first ("I've been down on the killing floors" and "I'll drag his corpse through the mud"). Explanation (maybe): Bob's in the Deep South; New Orleans, perhaps, or Atlanta? Both these tunes pass the old grey whistle test - i.e. are catchy enough for the old chap on the door to be heard whistling them.

While we're picking out the pretty tunes, let's try the descending scale of Long and Wasted Years. As ever, though, beware of the pretty tune. Behind this one is as bleak a picture of failed marriage as was ever put in song.

There are two twelve bar blues songs on the album, Narrow Way and Early Roman Kings. The key to Early Roman Kings is not Romulus and his 8th to 6th Century BCE successors, but a 1960's New York City gang.
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128 of 150 people found the following review helpful By BruBz on September 11, 2012
Format: Audio CD
Great Music but don't waste your money on the "Limited Edition" All you get for the extra $7.00
is a cheesy booklet.Not even glossy photos.
Buy the basic CD. If you like Dylan you will like it.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Thomsen on September 17, 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Tempest is, admittedly, for those who Joan Baez calls "True Believers" only. If this is your first exposure to Bob, the odds of your becoming an instant fan are a million to one. This album is for those of us who have never heard a 1 or 2 star Dylan album. Even his arguable "worst" albums offered up gems like Brownsville Girl and Silvio.

My very first reaction was, "Why all this gratuitous violence?" but I got over that in no time. I think it's at least as good as Love & Theft, perhaps better. Then again, my "favorite" Dylan output changes all the time.

I was pleasantly surprised to find that Duquesne Whistle might be, lyrically, the weakest song on the entire album. And it didn't take long to figure out that the bizarre video had more to do with the album than that song. Narrow Way is about, I read elsewhere -- his critics? Maybe, but as always he speaks on many levels. The If-I-can't-get-up-to-you, you-have-to-come-down-to-me line is just as much about all of his relationships - Critics? Yes. God? Yes. Lovers? Absolutely. Expectations be damned. This is a reminder that he's "got nothing more to live up to." And speaking of critics, and his voice, I think his biggest slap at them is the satisfaction on his face as he sucks his stogie on the inside cover, bringing his tobacco and whiskey drenched throat to the level of perfection they so despise.

The melodies generally go where I would not expect. I'm no musician, but the songs are performed in unusual keys. Flat notes. Minor chords. High notes where you expect low and vice versa. Clapton once said that was Dylan's genius, and it shows here. Not much you can dance to here unless you want to waltz along with Tempest or jerk awkwardly to Whistle. Listen to Muddy Waters' Mannish Boy.
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