Tempest 1928 NR

Amazon Instant Video

(14) IMDb 6.9/10
Available in HDAvailable on Prime

A lavish and beautifully-produced Hollywood confection of the high silent screen, this star vehicle for premier actor John Barrymore follows the adventures of peasant soldier Markov, who becomes an officer in the Imperial Russian Guard and falls in love with the scornful Princess Tamara (Camilla Horn). Winner of the First Academy Award for Interior Decoration and nominated for Best Cinematography. Transfered from a Rare 1950s Print from the Original Camera Negative. Also includes "Vagabonding on the Pacific" with John Barrymore offers a home movie record of the star aboard his yacht.

Starring:
John Barrymore, Camilla Horn
Runtime:
1 hour 22 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Tempest

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance
Director Sam Taylor, Lewis Milestone, Viktor Tourjansky
Starring John Barrymore, Camilla Horn
Supporting actors Louis Wolheim, Boris de Fast, George Fawcett, Ullrich Haupt, Michael Visaroff, John Bleifer, Albert Conti, Gregory Gaye, Lena Malena, Michael Mark, Dick Sutherland, Wilhelm von Brincken
Studio Egami
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Barrymore's performance is intensely subtle.
Steven Hellerstedt
His general considers him like a son, and holds him in extremely high esteem even though aristocrats and peasants didn't exactly mix or see eye-to-eye in those days.
Anyechka
TEMPEST is so eloquent visually, it's easy to understand why dialogue would be superfluous.
Robert M. Fells

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Robert M. Fells on July 17, 2003
Format: DVD
I concur with Peter George's remarks about this wonderful film but let me add a few additional points. The rather abrupt ending is indeed due to some missing footage. Contemporary reviews of TEMPEST mention a sleigh ride chase to the nearby Austrian border whereby Markov and Tamara make their escape from Soviet Russia. Some years back, the late, great film historian William K. Everson, told me that when the negative and prints of this film were discovered in the early 1950s, presumably including the one used for this dvd, all material had the chase sequence cut out. Everson surmised that it was used as stock footage for some other film. A brief intertitle bridging the action would smooth things out but this is such a minor point that it does not impact one's overall impression of this fine film.
It's difficult to resist comparing TEMPEST to a more celebrated silent of that same time, the classic SUNRISE, especially since Charles Rosher worked as a cinematographer on both films. Yet in my opinion, and I'm probably a majority of one here, I think that while SUNRISE is an easy film to respect, TEMPEST is more entertaining and will probably do more to whet the appetite of a viewer today to explore films from the silent era. Back in the 1970s I ran TEMPEST several times with live piano accompaniment and audience reaction was always the same: they didn't know a silent film could be so enjoyable. TEMPEST is so eloquent visually, it's easy to understand why dialogue would be superfluous. And John Barrymore gives a wonderfully underplayed performance that puts the lie to the stereotype of silent screen acting characterized by exaggerated gestures.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By "acmse" on November 15, 2003
Format: DVD
I consider this film to be a prime example of how truly powerful an impact silent film can have on the viewer. This was the first noncomedic silent I can recall seeing--about 30 years ago on local TV--and I only caught the end of it, including the tremendous prison confrontation scene. In the intervening years, I never forgot that scene, and noticed when it was imitated in other romantic melodramas (e.g., 'The English Patient' and the saffron thimble bit).
When the upcoming DVD release was described, I realized that this probably was the movie that had haunted me all these years. And it was! I was thrilled to finally be able to see the whole thing--and it didn't disappoint, even though it had to compete with powerful old impressions.
I'm very grateful to David Shepard for this release--and to the great Philip Carli, whose piano score is magisterial. The cobbled-together orchestral soundtrack is OK--mostly snatches of stuff like the waltz from "Eugene Onegin"--but the sound quality is not up to modern standards; oddly enough, I found that more distracting than the occasional visually scratchy portions of the print. Carli's performance and score are, as usual, as elegant as the images (and that's saying something with this film), but never distract from them.
Barrymore's inescapably "aristocratic" looks do sometimes interfere with the suspension of disbelief, but he overcomes this handicap--and not with a resort to grotesque makeup, but with a truly committed and engaged performance, overcoming even the more serious handicap of his age.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Steven Hellerstedt on September 16, 2005
Format: DVD
John Barrymore may not have been the greatest actor ever, but if you want to argue that he was you could do worse that enter as evidence the late-silent era film TEMPEST (1928). This is a film that has it all - romance across class lines (a peasant loves a princess,) set against a romantic yet contemporary (circa 1928) backdrop of the Russian Revolution.

Barrymore plays Ivan Markov, to the peasantry born, who we meet while still a sergeant in the Russian Army, studying diligently to become an officer and a gentleman by promotion to first lieutenant. It certainly helps that to the company commander he is a surrogate son. Unfortunately, he's attentively shunned by his fellow officers (upstart peasant!) while the commander's daughter, Princess Tamara (Camilla Horn), doesn't bother to disguise the fact that Ivan should go back to whatever stable he was born in. The Princess's beneath-contempt attitude is complicated by the fact that Ivan has fallen madly in love with Tamara at first sight. For her part, Princess Tamara's attitude of disgust and loathing is at violent odds with some tender emotions of her own she does her best to conceal.

Although a silent movie, this one reads as though it had spoken dialogue. Barrymore's performance is intensely subtle. One of the biggest differences between silent and sound movies is the acting styles. Most silent acting seems broad and phony. You can adjust and enjoy - hey, they had to sell the scenes somehow, didn't they? They couldn't talk their way out of them. But rather than the expressionistic silent style of acting, Barrymore's is more a modern, sound, naturalistic style.
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