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Ten Discoveries That Rewrote History Paperback – September 25, 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 226 pages
  • Publisher: Plume; First Printing edition (September 25, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0452288770
  • ISBN-13: 978-0452288775
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.5 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #182,566 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

PATRICK HUNT is in the Classics Department at Stanford University, where he has been teaching archaeology, mythology, and art history since 1994. He has been featured on the History Channel and in Archaeology magazine for his Hannibal alpine research and directs Stanford’s Alpine Archaeology project in France, Italy, and Switzerland. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

The author's writing style is accessible and reads like a good adventure novel.
Sunnyflower
This book will appeal to history buffs as well as to travelers going to the areas described, and I think it should be required reading for all college students.
History Buff
Dr. Hunt's expertise in archaeology and history is clearly demonstrated in this precious collection of ten well known archaeological sites.
Cadfael

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Patricia de Luna on September 30, 2007
Format: Paperback
Several years ago, my high school age sister rushed through the Louvre, sought out a laundry list of masterpieces and then checked them off as she viewed each one. As an accounting exercise, it was quite satisfying as she now has a piece of paper evidencing that she had physically seen each work of art. As an exercise in art appreciation it left a lot to be desired.

Fortunately, when Patrick Hunt wrote Ten Discoveries that Rewrote History, he brought to the project not just the completeness and accuracy of an accountant but also the sensibility of the well-renowned archaeologist and excellent story teller that he is.

Hunt knows his subject inside out and there is probably not better authority on the landmarks he has chosen to write about. More importantly, however, is that he makes the discoveries come to life. Hunt starts each chapter with a description of the discovery then describes in detail the excavation of the landmark. He then weaves the historical, cultural, and political implications of the discovery into his narrative, thus giving his readers a well-rounded view of some of the most well known wonders in the span of less than 25 pages.

Patrick Hunt excels at capturing the sentiments of both the creators and the discoverers of each featured item. The vivid descriptions make the reader feel as if he is situated in the time period and watching each story unfold before his/her eyes. It is also evident that Patrick Hunt shares in the awe of the grandeur and splendor of these amazing discoveries and through the strength of his writing is able to transfer that same excitement and awe to his audience.

Informative, yet entertaining, the book appeals to readers of all ages and will surely entice all to experience the discoveries first hand.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Cadfael on October 14, 2007
Format: Paperback
I am fortuante that I have been able to attend the course that Dr. Hunt taught on this subject a few summers back and I am thrilled to see the same subject come out in print. Dr. Hunt's expertise in archaeology and history is clearly demonstrated in this precious collection of ten well known archaeological sites. His writing style and ability to bring to light the most interesting facts about each discovery left me feeling that I wanted to visit each site in person. His prose is easy to read and follow, yet not at all over simplified. This is a huge benefit to me, since I have neither the technical nor scientific background to comprehend an overly academic treatment of the same subject matter. For those who wish to read more about each site, the selected bibliography included at the end of the book provides a helpful starting point.

Overall, a wonderful read - I do hope he is able to do the same with other fascinating discoveries that combine his knowledge of archaeology and history.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By History Buff on December 23, 2007
Format: Paperback
I just finished reading "Ten Discoveries that Rewrote History", by Patrick Hunt. This is a terrific book that is very readable yet provides great insight into some of the most important archaeological discoveries of all times (e.g., Rosetta Stone, Troy, Nineveh Library, King Tut's Tomb, Machu Picchu, Pompeii, Dead Sea Scrolls, Thera/Santorini/Atlantis, Olduvai Gorge, and the Terra Cotta Warriors in China). Besides giving the basics on the digs and their history, Prof. Hunt provides hard to find information on the people involved as well as the importance of the digs to archaeology and society. I especially enjoyed the anecdotes whereby he describes his own personal experiences (e.g., becoming an "amauta" (high priest) by playing his flute at Machu Picchu). This book will appeal to history buffs as well as to travelers going to the areas described, and I think it should be required reading for all college students.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Laporte on October 15, 2008
Format: Paperback
Patrick Hunt put together a delightful little book from the themes he covers in a popular college course, Ten Discoveries That Rewrote History. This well written book takes the reader on a journey across the globe and back and forth through time.

As a Biblical historian, I found the text not overly academic without shirking responsibilities of noting cultural context and impact on traditional understanding in various schools of thought. Hunt chronicles such discoveries as the Terracotta Warriors, the Rosetta Stone and Machu Picchu and their effect on science, history and popular culture.

Hunt's book gives meaningful information that will serve all readers well regardless, of their walk of life. If it doesn't make you fantasize about being Indiana Jones, it will certainly entice you to travel to some of, if not all of, the exquisite locales described within the book.
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A lurker on January 16, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I wanted to love this book because the topics it covers are fascinating, but the poor writing ruined it for me. For one thing, the author is incredibly repetative. For instance, in the chapter on Troy he makes the point that the importance of its discovery comes from the fact that it ushered in the modern ear of archeology. Valid and interesting point, but he makes it over and over again. He must state it in nearly every other paragraph. If he was restating it to elaborate on the idea, that might be okay, but he rarely elaborates in this book. He sticks to broad, superficial explanations... which is another complaint I have about the book: it's too superficial. Don't get me wrong -- I was looking for a book written for laymen, not academics. But even so, I still expected the book to be a bit more detailed.

In addition, his writting is erractic and unclear. For instance, in the chapter on the Assyrian library he states that "Layard knew he would dream that night the same dream about Ninevah." The "same" dream? Same as what? There doesn't appear to be an antecdent to the dream. I have no idea to what he's referening. Though things like that are minor, the book is riddled with them.

Finally, in the chapter on Machu Picchu he quotes an excerpt from Hiram Bingham where Bingham says that the native guide was reluctant to take him up the mountain top until he offered him a substantial sum of money. Seems like a pretty straight forward anecdote, but the author sees it as "condescending" or "eurocentric." He says Bingham's quote might suggest that Bingham harboured racists feelings of superiority over the natives. Huh? Because he said the guide was persauded by money? I persaude my son to shovel the walk in snow storms by offering him money -- does that make me condescending, eurocentric or racist? The author's irrational reaction suggests he's one of those overly-sensitive PC-types who's looking for boogie men.
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