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The Army of Tennessee (The Civilization of the American Indian Series) Paperback – September 15, 1993


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Product Details

  • Series: The Civilization of the American Indian Series (Book 30)
  • Paperback: 524 pages
  • Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press; Reprint edition (September 15, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0806125659
  • ISBN-13: 978-0806125657
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #816,590 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Horn’s tale is filled with enough specific facts, dates and places to satisfy the most critical Civil War buff. At the same time, he has immensely increased the readability of the book by close attention to the human side of the War in the West. It is expertly spiced with character sketches and incidents by which the story of the Army of Tennessee comes alive.”—Stars and Stripes



“If this book, with its tantalizing glimpses of great events, could but stir interest in the forgotten focal point of America’s great agony, it will have more than justified its publication.”—Washington Post

About the Author

Stanley F. Horn was born near Nashville, Tennessee, in the midst of the scenes of the activities of the Army of Tennessee. He was the editor of Southern Lumberman Magazine and the author of many books.



Albert Castel, a Civil War historian living in Hillsdale, Michigan, is the author of Decision in the West: The Atlanta Campaign of 1864.


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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 7 customer reviews
The Army of the Tennessee is a good find for the War Between the States enthusiast.
Jethro
There are not a lot of photos or maps, but the ones that are provided, are given with purpose.
Nowhere Man
His writing style is very compelling in its own right and will keep you turning the pages.
Thomas W. Robinson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Charles C. DiVincenti Jr. on April 30, 2003
Format: Paperback
Although written 50+ years ago, this offering by Horn give a nice survey of this unit. A splendid look at actions in Missouri and Arkansas sets the stage for further accounts of Fort Henry, Fort Donelson and the usual litany of the AOT theatres of battle.
I found the text very reader friendly, although a few more maps would have been helpful. This edition's use of large-style print was also a treat. His discourse on some key military personalities is very interesting - especially his take on Sherman. I never "saw" Cump Sherman viewed with these insights before! A new intro/preface brings the reader up-to-speed on the current literature concerning the Army of Tennessee to offer the reader a more modern take on exploits of A. S. Johnston, Bishop Polk, Bragg and Hood. An excellent starting point for future in-depth study.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Jack Trammell on December 2, 1998
Format: Paperback
I still find this book useful, despite the sources that have been discovered or reinterpreted since Horn wrote his book. He blends anecdotal information with larger views on strategy and poltical conflicts. The story of the Army of Tennessee is still a story that remains largely untold, and Horn tells it very well.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Michael E. Fitzgerald on February 2, 2004
Format: Paperback
I like reading some of the older books written on various aspects of the Civil War. Stan Horn's book is often quoted in many of the bibliographies of more recent vintage. Despite its age, it remains a key work on the Confederacy's war plans in its Central theater of operations. It is remarkably devoid of Confederate excuses.
The book focuses on the performance of the Army of Tennessee and Horn places the blame for its poor performance where it belongs, on the Confederacy's High Command. He does an unusually good job with the bickering that occurred in key command positions, analyzes Jeff Davis' curious support for Braxton Bragg and lays the blame for this Army's ultimate destruction under John Bell Hood where it belongs, at the feet of Jeff Davis.
Well written and researched, it is a book well worth the time.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Thomas W. Robinson on May 17, 2007
Format: Paperback
Stanley F. Horn's book was first published in 1941, but it still remains a key tool on learning about the Confederacy's tragic, "other" army. Although Lee's Army of Northern Virginia gets most of the press, the stories involving the Confederacy's other major army are just as compelling. And that is the key feature of Horn's book. His writing style is very compelling in its own right and will keep you turning the pages. And, surprisingly, as another reviewer pointed out, despite being a Nashville native, Horn's book is not full of Lost Cause mythology and excuses like some other books of this time period. What you get from Horn is the facts and certainly his opinion. If you are a fan of Braxton Bragg or John Bell Hood you might want to skip this book because Horn is not afraid on heaping blame on them. To his credit, though, Horn praises Bragg and Hood when he feels it is due (mostly for ideas they had as opposed to their execution of said plans). While Thomas Lawrence Connelly's two volume work on the AOT from the 1970s has surpassed Horn's for an academic, scholarly look at the Army, Horn's book still deserves a place on your shelf for its readability and stories from the command tent down to the privates.
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