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  • Terk Technology HDTVi VHF/UHF HDTV Indoor Antenna
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Terk Technology HDTVi VHF/UHF HDTV Indoor Antenna

by Terk
388 customer reviews
| 13 answered questions

Available from these sellers.
  • Optimized to receive all HDTV channels (2 to 69) for free local high-definition entertainment when used with a compatible TV or TV/receiver
  • Great for apartments or condos, where roof access is limited
  • Small footprint occupies little space; high gain lets you pick up more stations
  • Highly directional UHF elements eliminate unwanted reflected signals that interfere with reception
  • Measures 13.5 x 42 x 16.5 inches (W x H x D) with dipoles extended
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Technical Details

  • Brand Name: Terk
  • Model Number: HD-TVi
  • Item Display Weight: 3.00 pounds

Product Description

Product Description

Terk antennas are designed to deliver sharp, clear, high definition signal reception. At Terk, the engineering department is dedicated to designing antennas that enhance both the latest technology and the aesthetics of any viewing environment. The HDTVi indoor antenna installs in minutes, is easy to use and simple to adjust. Features: Optimized for HDTV reception UHF and VHF elements for reception of all available broadcasts (channels 2-69) Highly directional UHF element reduces signal interference Specifications: VHF channels: 2-13 UHF channels: 14-69 Output impedance: 75 ohms Height with dipoles fully extended: 42" Manual included Warranty: one year parts

From the Manufacturer

Terk Technology HDTVi VHF/UHF HDTV Indoor Antenna

Terk antennas are designed to deliver sharp, clear, high definition signal reception. At Terk, the engineering department is dedicated to designing antennas that enhance both the latest technology and the aesthetics of any viewing environment. The HDTVi indoor antenna installs in minutes, is easy to use and simple to adjust. Features: Optimized for HDTV reception UHF and VHF elements for reception of all available broadcasts (channels 2-69) Highly directional UHF element reduces signal interference Specifications: VHF channels: 2-13 UHF channels: 14-69 Output impedance: 75 ohms Height with dipoles fully extended: 42" Manual included Warranty: one year parts.

Model

FDTV2

FDTV2

FDTV2A

FDTV2A

FDTV1A

FDTV1A

HDTVA

HDTVA

HDTVI

HDTVI

Operating Bandwidth: VHF

174-216 MHz

174-216 MHz

174-216 MHz

Channels 2-13

Channels 2-13

Operating Bandwidth: UHF

470-698 MHz

470-698 MHz

470-698 MHz

Channels 14-69

Channels 14-69

Output Impedance:

75 Ohms

75 Ohms

75 Ohms

75 Ohms

75 Ohms

Amplifier Gain:

-

10dB Typical

10dB Typical

VHF: 12dB Typical
UHF: 11dB Typical

-

Power Supply:

-

12V DC 100mA

12V DC 100mA

-

-

Accessories Included:

Mounting stand, mounting hardware

Mounting stand, power injector,
removable amplifier, hardware

Mounting stand, power injector,
removable amplifier, hardware

Power injector, instruction manual

Instruction Manual


Product Information

Technical Details
Brand NameTerk
Item Weight1 pounds
Product Dimensions14.4 x 13 x 3.6 inches
Item model numberHD-TVi
  
Technical Specification
Additional Information
ASINB0001FV36E
Best Sellers Rank
Shipping Weight2.6 pounds
Domestic Shipping Item can be shipped within U.S.
International Shipping This item is not eligible for international shipping. Learn More
Date First AvailableFebruary 1, 2004
  
Warranty & Support

Product Warranty: For warranty information about this product, please click here
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Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

362 of 370 people found the following review helpful By Richard H. on March 20, 2005
To start, your antenna is only as good as the signal that is reaching your home! The HDTVi does a great job on receiving UHF signals, a very good job on VHF signals. From alot of reviews of antennas, it would appear people are clueless on HDTV reception. For your local reception, I'd check out the forum at the following address. They have information and experience going back a couple years on HDTV reception in many cities. So before trying to wrestle with antennas, first make sure you aren't searching for nothing. When I started, I couldn't find ABC not because of the antenna, but because the station was transmitting for four days! [...]

I tried 5 antennas, an old one, the HDTVi, the Terk TV5, Radio Shack amplified antenna (15-1880), and Philips' amplified antenna (SCA050). The best reception was received on the Radio Shack, however, the amplifier needed to be higher for reception of CBS while it had to be lower for FOX or FOX wouldn't come in. This was bothersome. I was also able to get a weak NBC signal unlike any other antenna I had, but the signal just wasn't strong enough. The TV5 had mediocre coverage. It was able to get UHF decently, but it was fighting to get upper and lower VHF. The Philips and HDTVi had similar reception, but the HDTVi wasn't amplified which meant I would have more options regarding moving the antenna around, such as placing in the attic without worrying about plugging it in.

Ultimately, as far as UHF was concerned, each antenna had similar results. It was in VHF that the antennas were a bit different.
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359 of 371 people found the following review helpful By A. Tubesing on December 1, 2007
Verified Purchase
If you're looking for a plain old rabbit-ear type antenna with about the same performance, this model will work for you but it's nothing special. It didn't improve the picture over our cheap $10 rabbit ear set with UHF loop. It's large and unstable with such a small base. One advantage is that the VHF telescoping antennae are quite thick and stout, much more durable than your average cheapo antenna.

I am a cable TV professional and have the gear to make actual measurements. I took readings on all the local channels and compared them to my simple antenna. This one measured at most 10% higher in signal strength, not enough to make a difference in the picture.

Here's a couple tips on antennas in general:
Other posts are correct when they say there's nothing HD about any antenna. The HD channels your TV tunes in are simply UHF channels, though it tries to hide that from you. So as long as your antenna has UHF capability then it's already HD capable. Don't waste money replacing an existing antenna thinking you need a new one for HD. For those of you who don't get the lingo, VHF uses the long pole antenna and includes integer-numbered channels 2-13. Everything else is UHF (including the ones your TV calls decimal numbers like 5.1, 5.2, etc) which uses the loop antenna or t-cross type elements as in this model.

One more note, an "amplified antenna" will not improve reception. They are made for applications with long cable runs or where you need to split the signal to several locations--they boost the signal to overcome signal loss introduced by the cables and splitter. If you are connecting the antenna to a single device, then the amplifier will not help you, in fact it's more likely to make things worse.
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112 of 120 people found the following review helpful By Brian Lee on May 8, 2005
I was shopping around for an indoor HDTV antenna until I stumbled across Terk's HDTVi. I bought one but the HDTV reception was terrible. My Philips Magnavox SCP030 from Walmart even worked better.

I still needed a good indoor antenna so I headed to RadioShack. First I tried the RadioShack's Amplified HDTV antenna but that didn't work so well either. I noticed they also had a Terk HDTVa in stock so I exchanged it with that one.

The HDTVa and the HDTVi are essentially the same except the "a" version has an extra adaptor called an in-line signal amplifier. It's a powered adaptor that goes on the end of the coaxial cable. After attaching that to the antenna, the signal jumped from 75% to 85% signal strength.

I HIGHLY recommend the HDTVa version instead of the HDTVi. If you've already bought the HDTVi, you can make it an HDTVa by getting an in-line signal amplifier from RadioShack or any online store.
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By B. Chi on February 7, 2006
Verified Purchase
I recently bought a Philips 50 inch plasma TV with built-in HDTV tuner for OTA reception of HD signals. This was my first venture into HD so I had much questions regarding how to get OTA HD signals. I found AVSforum most helpful regarding all my questions. However, I was told that if I live in a large city such as Los Angeles and my non-HD reception was adequate then I would not have to buy any special antenna to receive HD OTA. A coat hanger would suffice. So I hooked my new plasma to my old rabbit ear since I live in a condo complex and cannot put out an outdoor antenna. With it, I was able to pull down 4 HD signals but they were unstable. In fact, I was never able get ABC HD and a couple of the local HD stations. I had two other indoor antennae lying around and one was even amplified that I bought from Radio Shack recently. Even with the amplified one, I got no better result then my initial older rabbit ear.

I bought this plasma TV set hoping I would be able to watch "Super Bowl" HD but instead, I had to settle for a slightly doubled imaged analog "Super Bowl". After trying all three antennae in various positions in my condo and ultimately using a longer coaxial, I pulled it out unto my balcony - no difference. No better.

After reading this site and AVS forum and other reviews, I finally settled on trying Terk HDTVi, an un-amplifited antenna with some skepticism since I had no luck with all my rabbit ears.

The set up was so easy. Through antennaweb.org, I found out where all Los Angeles' TV towers are and I aimed this unit in that general direction and I repeat my new plasma's channel auto-detection programming function and watched as it tallied up all the digital and non-digital channels it was now able to receive. According to antennaweb.
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