Terra Antarctica: Looking into the Emptiest Continent and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.95
  • Save: $2.44 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Usually ships within 3 to 4 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Book has some visible wear on the binding, cover, pages. Biggest little used bookstore in the world.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Terra Antarctica: Looking into the Emptiest Continent Paperback – April 5, 2007


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.51
$2.92 $0.22
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Terra Antarctica: Looking into the Emptiest Continent + Terra Incognita: Travels in Antarctica
Price for both: $29.75

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 328 pages
  • Publisher: Counterpoint; 1ST edition (April 5, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1593761481
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593761486
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #493,314 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The environment of Antarctica, "the largest and most extreme desert on Earth," is so foreign to our visual expectations that we are almost unable to perceive it. For Fox (Playa Works), who studies the ways in which humans respond to such vast, empty spaces, it's the ideal location for examining the connection between cognition and extreme landscapes. In this insightful book, he chronicles his Antarctic sojourn during the austral summer of 2001–2002, recording his impressions of the landscape and the people who live at McMurdo Station on Ross Island and at Pole, a newer station a few hundred feet away from the South Pole. At the same time, he examines the works of the cartographers, painters and photographers who have depicted Antarctica from the days of the earliest explorations down to the present, showing how the human mind transforms pure space into landscape, then turns landscape into art. A fascinating look at the "windiest, coldest, highest, and driest continent on earth" and man's creative responses to it, this seems the perfect read after seeing The March of the Penguins. 40 color photos, 2 maps. (Oct.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* So pristine is Antarctica, and so spare is its ecosystem, it has become a living laboratory for scientists studying everything from the icy continent's microbial life to cosmic radiation. Thanks to the National Science Foundation program, in which author Fox participated, it is also a sublime studio for artists and writers. Fox became fascinated with how visitors to Antarctica, a land wholly unlike the realm in which humans evolved, are baffled by mirages and "cognitive dissonance." The continent's "monolithic expanses of flat white ice" confound our perceptual mechanism. Fox vividly describes his own disorienting sensory experiences while trekking across the world's largest desert and offers a fresh and enlightening history of the two disciplines have that enabled us to "see" otherwise incomprehensible places: cartography and landscape art. This leads to intriguing portraits of Antarctica's first explorers and the gifted men who mapped, drew, painted, and photographed its spectacular and daunting vistas, staggering accomplishments Fox compares to today's intrepid Antarctic science and art in a lively report on life at McMurdo Station and the South Pole. Thoughtful and enjoyable on many fronts, Fox's uniquely fashioned chronicle of Antarctica brings into sharper focus the crucial symbiosis between art and science. Donna Seaman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By The Delite Rancher VINE VOICE on January 27, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In "Terra Antarctica," William L. Fox visits the emptiest continent through the National Science Foundation's Antarctic Visiting Artists and Writers Program. It's hard to imagine a better thinker and artist to travel to and write about 'the windiest, coldest and driest continent.' The book works on several levels. First and perhaps most importantly, it works as an adventurer's travelogue. Exciting locations include the lava lake in Mt. Erebus, the South Pole, penguin colonies, the eerie Dry Valleys and historical structures leftover from the heroic age of Shackleton. Second, the book works as a philosophical treatise, exploring how the human vehicle makes sense of such wide open spaces. Those who are familiar with Fox's books about the desert and geography will be familiar with these themes. Third, "Terra Antarctica" documents the history of the continent. It offers an overview of human exploration and settlement in Antarctica. Fourth, the book is very scientifically minded. In addition to offering a geological overview, Fox easily writes about the newest research that sheds light on how life survives on the frozen continent. Fifth and finally, "Terra Antarctica" examines how the place inspires art. Most readers wouldn't associate art with Antarctica, but there's much to write about on this topic as Fox provides a historical overview with detailed information on today's relevant artists. To illustrate this material, the book contains numerous plates that feature examples of either important or representative work. During his adventure, Fox spends a good deal of time at McMurdo Station, a town sized research center. From there, he travels to multiple locations. He often joins scientists working in the field. At other times, Fox visits other research centers like the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What a story. I love non fiction and it's hard to get into but this author takes you on a journey !
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By C. Flood on January 2, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book needs some serious editing. It jumps all over the place. One minute you are hiking in a Whiteout, and the next moment you are getting chapters of history lessons on Antarctica. It's as if he didn't know what he wanted to accomplish writing the book beyond sharing what he experienced there, so he went to the library to fill in the blanks.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on October 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
Terra Antarctica: Looking Into the Emptiest Continent is the true-life story of award-finalist author William L. Fox's journey to explore the Antarctic, the "largest and most extreme desert on Earth". A medley of artistic, cartographic, and scientific images intertwine in his reflections of the remote and brutally harsh continent. A handful of gorgeous color photographs illustrate this compelling tale tempered with a scientist's respect for and love of nature's glory.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?