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Terra Madre: Forging a New Global Network of Sustainable Food Communities Paperback – February 22, 2010


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Terra Madre: Forging a New Global Network of Sustainable Food Communities + Slow Food: The Case for Taste (Arts and Traditions of the Table: Perspectives on Culinary History)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 184 pages
  • Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing; 1 edition (February 22, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1603582630
  • ISBN-13: 978-1603582636
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 5.3 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #398,248 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Terra Madre is the way Slow Food has kept itself the international pioneer in food justice and good food, defending the power of the small against the big and embracing the new. If you haven't been to this extraordinary gathering you'll want to go to the next-and Carlo Petrini will inspire you to find your own way to lead food into the future."--Corby Kummer, Senior Editor, The Atlantic, and author of The Pleasures of Slow Food



"When the world's food traditions come together at Terra Madre, we catch a glimpse of what it would be like to exchange, learn, share and widen our lives in ways that are truly sustainable. In this fine manifesto, Carlo Petrini captures the essence of that world, and offers an agenda for change that is both necessary and deeply desirable."--Raj Patel, author of The Value of Nothing



"Timely, essential, and full of joy!"--Judy Wicks, founder of White Dog Cafe

About the Author

Carlo Petrini, born in the small northern Italian town of Bra in 1949, is the founder and international president of the Slow Food movement, committed to the promotion of “good, clean and fair food.” The author of several books, he contributes regularly to Italian dailies and magazines on matters related to gastronomy and food politics. To write Terra Madre, he collaborated closely with Carlo Bogliotti, an editor of the Slowfood magazine and governor of the Slow Food Italy association.


More About the Author

Carlo Petrini is the founder of the international Slow Food movement, which was established in 1986 and now has more than 70,000 members in 45 countries around the world. Slow Food is committed to celebrating and preserving biological and regional diversity in food, and to promoting taste education, as well as supporting local agriculture and economies in our increasingly homogenous world.

Customer Reviews

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This book is especially poorly and vaguely written and awkwardly translated so as to be a very difficult read.
David Ross
"Terra Madre" by Slow Food founder Carlo Petrini is an inspirational book about the Terra Madre sustainable food community.
Malvin
I think the true testament is I finished this book hardly remembering what I read not feeling like I learned very much.
Chicago Book Addict

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Chicago Book Addict TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 27, 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
In Terra Madre, Carlos Petrini, founder of Slow Food, details the principles behind Terre Madre, a conference/organization he founded to bring together small farmers/producers from all over the world. I was immediately drawn to this book because I am very interested in food and especially local and sustainable food movements. I've read a lot of books in this area and thought this would be right up my alley.
Unfortunately, I didn't enjoy this book at all. I had a few key problems with it. The first was that the book didn't really flow at all. The writing felt choppy and lacking a sense of storytelling, which meant at points I almost had to force myself to keep reading. Since this is subject matter I usually enjoy I find this shocking! However, Petrini talks about it in a dry way, barely weaving in the stories of the producers or the communities that comprise Terre Madre.

I also don't know that he provides much of a new perspective on things like sustainable agriculture, local food, biodiversity, or the other topics he covers in the book. His perspective is covered only at a high level and doesn't really add much to what is already being said. It almost feels like you're having a rambling conversation with him where he tells you all the things that are important to him, but doesn't really relate them to one another or give you all the knowledge you need to understand them fully.

I think the true testament is I finished this book hardly remembering what I read not feeling like I learned very much. I cannot say I would recommend this unless you already have a very strong interest in Terra Madre or are a fan of Petrini.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kitten Kisser VINE VOICE on May 7, 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The three stars are all for the idea & noble cause of the book & not the book itself. I am a huge supporter of local and organic foods as well us encouraging others to grow & raise their own food. We are organic hobby farmers and we raise organic happy livestock as well as growing a lot of our own food. Normally books like this are right up my alley. Not so with this one. I have had the book for 2 months now & it just shouldn't take that long to read something so tiny. It is boring. Utterly mind numbingly boring. It's really too bad. If the author could have written this in a more engaging way, I think it would have caught more attention. The more attention paid to supporting slow food, local food, organic food - the better.
I don't want to say not to get this book, but on the other hand, I can't say get it either. There are many other "green movement" books out there that are much better & as a result, very popular. Michael Pollan being one of them as well as Barbara Kingsolver. Just searching for their books, will lead you to many other similar types of books. 'Fast Food Nation' by Eric Schlosser is a long time favorite of mine. It is not about slow food. It's about fast food. But reading it will most likely make you want to eat slow food & appreciate it's value. All three of the above mentioned books are available on Amazon.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Gene Twilley VINE VOICE on January 28, 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Petrini seems to come out with guns blazing at people who just don't "get" the value of being part of the local sustainable food process. While there are some great stories and snippets of what folks are doing around the world to encourage hetero-agronomies, there's also a healthy dose of judgmental overtones against people who aren't doing the same (or who are not, at least, consumers of the process). Additionally, I didn't expect the text to be so much of a self-advertisement regarding his own movement.

To let you know, I write this even as one who plants and harvests in a community urban garden that my wife helped start, who tries to purchase local vegetables in season and meats that are also harvested locally (with minimal intervention from hormones, steroids and with diets that tend to be more natural), who has participated as a sharer in a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) and who values diversity in what is grown over and above homogenization of produce by large corporations.

But if I were as one who was more from the outside looking in, I would walk away from reading this book thinking that Pertrini is generally self-focused and unwelcoming to those who don't already see the world as he does. I also don't think that the salvation of our diets and culture at large are found through methods of growing in a diversity of grains and fruits (which is what seems to come across as the key to Terra Madre).

At the end of it all, I found myself fairly unimpressed and questioning the intent of what this book is about written by a man who seems to think that it is impossible to think rightly if you don't think as he does.

** As an aside, I think it should be noted that I don't really have anything against Carlo Petrini; these are just my opinions of his book...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. Vance VINE VOICE on May 18, 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I was excited to get this book, as I have spent years working toward making our farm self sustaining. I believe in local food, slow food, and thought this book would have some wonderful nuggets of information to let my mind chew on.
Instead, my mind felt numbed. The book takes a fascinating subject that needs to be heard and turns it into a boring sludge of choppy writing and dull verbiage.
I'm really feeling angry at the authors. How could they throw off such a great opportunity to teach and reach? I gave it two stars because of my love for the topic.
Pass on this one. Period.
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