Terry Riley: In C

March 24, 2009 | Format: MP3

$5.94
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
41:57
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 24, 2009
  • Release Date: March 24, 2009
  • Label: Sony Classical
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 41:57
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001VWMSDI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #50,604 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By DAC Crowell on April 3, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Ting, ting, ting, ting, ting, ting, ting, ting...that's how this starts, with a drumming pulse on the top Cs on a piano. Then gradually, a whole tapestry of interlocking sounds starts to unfold, and you're slowly getting immersed in 'In C'. You don't really listen to this piece; the effect is much more like that aforementioned 'immersion', as the very gradual shifting of the patterns is more like organic growth, instead of the architectural jumps and skips found in Philip Glass or Steve Reich's works. How this is accomplished is by the use of a very selective variant on chance processes; since performers aren't given direct instructions on when to change from one ostinato to the next, this slow, 'oozing' shifting occurs, and it's quite fascinating (as opposed to what one reviewer here seems to think). It's certainly not an easy work to wrap your head around, unlike Glass, etc, but both the music and the ideas behind it are most rewarding. A critical work.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Lee on December 29, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Minimalism has produced five masterpieces: Philip Glass' "Music in Twelve Parts" and "Einstein on the Beach," La Monte Young's "The Well-Tuned Piano" (good luck finding that one!), Steve Reich's "Music for 18 Musicians," and Terry Riley's "In C." Although there are several recordings of "In C", each with a different orchestration, this one is probably still the best recording after all is said and done. (I only wish Mr. Riley would make a much longer recording, AT LEAST two hours long.)
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Martin R. Lash on September 21, 2009
Format: Audio CD
This is one of the works and recodings that put minimalism on the map. Riley's "In C" has been called the "The Rite of Spring" of our time. This first recording led the way to the many other versions that appeared but this is the first and the best (The more recent Innova CD is worth hearing). Fans of minimalism either have the original CBS recording or should add this reisssue to their collection. A must-have.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 29, 1999
Format: Audio CD
This is one of the first of the "minimalist" movement. Though it is hard to "HEAR" It is wonderful to "LISTEN" to. Every fan of the minimalist movement should atleast listen to this recording. I would say this recording is "essential". Highly recomended.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By T. Fisher TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 21, 2011
Format: Audio CD
This recording has some incredible historical significance to it. Forget about minimalism -- I first started wondering about Terry Riley's "In C" because Pete Townshend of The Who said it was the inspiration for his synthesizer riff on the classic rock anthem "Baba O'Riley". It was only later that I started to understand things like Philip Glass or Steve Reich and to realize that Terry Riley fit into that tradition as well, and how significant it really was that "In C" is recognized by many as either the first or one of the first minimalist compositions.

Listening to the piece on this recording -- the first ever made of "In C" and featuring Terry Riley himself on saxophone -- I could definitely hear the connection to music in the more popular minimalist vein. There are brief sections -- perhaps no more than half a minute or so at a stretch -- where I felt the music could actually have been written by Philip Glass if it weren't for the more rambunctious instrumentation. Of course, after a while something uncontrolled breaks out in the structured chaos of this piece that reminds you firmly that this is something else, something less refined and domesticated than mainstream minimalism.

The instrumentation really is something. I listened to the piece before reading about it, and I really thought there must be a gamelan in there, but sadly there is not. In addition to a piano pulse, the instruments are saxophone, oboe, bassoon, trumpet, clarinet, flute, viola, trombone, vibraphone, marimbaphone. But there is definitely a gamelan-like effect that for me recalled Balinese/Javanese music.

This is not music I'd listen to every week, but still I highly recommend it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Discophage TOP 1000 REVIEWER on August 24, 2010
Format: Audio CD
Riley needs no introduction, and "In C" needs neither introduction nor advocacy. Composed in 1964, it is the composition that invented - or so many say, but not Riley, who has always paid tribute to LaMonte Young for being the mastermind of all of it - what has come to be known as "minimalism", but what I prefer to call "repetitive music", or "repetitive minimalism": it may be based on the repetition of minimal cells, but the result can be all but "minimal", as illustrated by In C.

The score - reproduced on the original LP and here again, although the choice of white print on black surface and the CD-booklet size make it more an image to contemplate than a score to read - is little more than a canvass, consisting indeed of 53 small melodic cells, some limited to three notes/two pitches. There is an additional pitch not represented in the score, called "the pulse": a piano playing a constant 8th-notes, fast tempo ostinato toll of two octave high-Cs. It starts and ends the piece, bare. The principle of the composition is to have any number of any instruments, each playing each of the 53 cells in succession (but some may be omitted), each moving to the next ad lib, though with relative synchronisation with all the rest: the rule here is that there should be no more than five cells distance between any player. The effect, in Riley's own words, is like "lying in a field, and there are cloud formations just passing over, and you're just watching them form and reform".

As many have remarked, though the harmonic basis in C, in moves through various related tonalities.
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