Terry Riley: A Rainbow In Curved Air; Poppy Nogood and the Phantom Band

March 15, 1988 | Format: MP3

$6.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
18:39
30
2
21:38


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 15, 1988
  • Release Date: March 15, 1988
  • Label: Sony Classical
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 40:17
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00138KCRO
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #26,733 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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See all 13 customer reviews
Perhaps the most perfect moment of my life.
Christopher Browne
That builds to where Riley introduces looped drums and insterments like harpsichord,piano and some keyboard that has this oriental pluck to it.
R.Cittern
Very highly recommended to my fellow proggers.
Jeffrey J.Park

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 31 people found the following review helpful By DAC Crowell on April 3, 2000
Format: Audio CD
That subject pretty much says it all. This pair of pieces sees Terry Riley during the initial period of his experiments with tape delays and electronic organs, where he began to create long, flowing improvisational tapestries of repeating periodic forms. If you're familiar with Indian music, particular Karnatic music, you'll find this especially fascinating, as there's a definite parentage from the Indian subcontinent to this style. The title work is a gentle, melodic, flowing piece which swirls around and around, sort of like some candy-colored psychedelic dervish dance. But the other piece, "Poppy Nogood and the Phantom Band", is a dark and delicious work, with Riley adding his superb sax (very shenai-influenced, it should be noted) playing to the mix along with tense organ drones and shocking, abrupt shifts of tone. A great work to play for those who dismiss minimalism as bland repetitive background music! This is a truly important release, and also an excellent introduction to this important period in Terry Riley's output.
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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By rubidium84 on December 3, 2002
Format: Audio CD
This is another one of those records that come out very rarely and change the face of music. It has been said by my fellow reviewers that this record basically started the trance/new wave/techno scene. This record also premiered the "Time-lag accumulator", two Revox reel-to-reel tape recorders wired together in such a way as to create a continuous loop of sound. This was the machine that Fripp and Eno used on their groundbreaking "(No Pussyfooting)" album.
Listening to the record's first track is like watching water boil, or a hive of bees. It is both constantly changing while also being completely static. The structure is impeccable, reminding one of the fugues of Bach at times. And the keyboard sounds that Riley chooses are some of the most interesting that I've ever heard, especially the "Rockschichord" that comes in at around 10:00.
The first track presents the sunny, happy side of Looping; in the second we hear a more disturbing presentation. You first hear the ominous sound of Riley's looped saxophone creep out of the speakers, but that is gradually overtaken by a dark organ drone. Throughout the next twenty minutes the saxophone fades in and out, but the drone remains constant. And at the end, when your head is completely lost in the music, the drone stops - and the silence that ends the CD is more shocking than the loudest discord.
I recommend this CD to anyone who is in on the current techno-trance scene, so they can hear where the movement began.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey J.Park VINE VOICE on August 25, 2006
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I found my first exposure to the music of American minimalist composer Terry Riley (and minimalism as a genre), to be extremely rewarding. As a fan of 1970s progressive rock and electronica, I am a little surprised that I did not explore the genre sooner, given that there is so much overlap between audiences of progressive and minimalism...well, at least there was overlap back when both styles formed part of a "popular avant-garde". At any rate, this 1969 album is excellent and sounds (to my ears) as exciting and innovative now as I am certain it did upon its release.

Terry Riley plays quite an assortment of instruments on this album including electric organ, RMI electric harpsichord, rocksichord, dumbec (finger drum), and tambourine. The electric organ however, which is heavily treated at times, dominates the soundscape. There is also heavily electronically altered soprano saxophone in the mix too. Quite honestly, this is some of the strangest and most eerie saxophone playing I have ever heard - very long sustained tones, with only incremental changes.

The music on this album is characterized by a series of what musicologists refer to as "ostinato networks". These networks are comprised of layers of interlocking and repeated melodic patterns that gradually unfold over long periods of time (A Rainbow in Curved Air = 18'39"; Poppy Nogood and the Phantom Band = 21'38") with only very subtle changes over the course of each piece. There is however, a subtle rhythmic element, which is nicely demonstrated on the first piece. Evidently, this is a tendency borrowed from American jazz styles.

In large part however, the music on this album is deeply meditative, and at times borders on the hypnotic.
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32 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Browne on February 21, 1998
Format: Audio CD
It was winter, 1969, Great Barrington, Vt. I was visiting my girlfriend. I arrived the night before, from Connecticut, exhausted, jealous, foolish... in the morning, she left in the shadows for the shower. I sat of the edge of the bed and turned on her record player. It cycled and the arm dropped down on Rainbow in Curved Air. I opened the curtains with a yank and the sky was FULL of falling white snow. The music began. In two weeks our affair would be over, but the music of that moment will always be with me. Perhaps the most perfect moment of my life. Chris Browne END
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By R.Cittern on June 30, 2005
Format: Audio CD
When you say Terry Riley most people say "who?".Terry Riley made people think about the sythizier and tape loops,without him where would Baba O' Riley be,what about Eno,Soft Machine,even Pink Floyd and Funeral For a Friend by Elton. They sure wouldn't have have the synth in there or that melodelic sound.The title track Rainbows in Curved Air opens and finishes with this looped organ,synth track going around with some trickles of lead synth pouring down with some organ chords ont the side. Second part introduces tamborine professionally played and some backwards organ. That builds to where Riley introduces looped drums and insterments like harpsichord,piano and some keyboard that has this oriental pluck to it. This goes on on tell the piece suddenly stops. We then listen to the live Poppy Nogood and Phantom Band which is played with two to three tape machines playing at a different times to get a looped effect. bass drones start the song and end the song on this one With these wierd brass like insterments building and building kind of like In C.We hear Terry Riley on sax squealing away the the track gos to this brass loop with a drone callback responce.That fades to a heavy bass drone and Terry on sax which is loop for a echo effect with is pretty hyponotizing. The sax gets more intense by the minute and ends with the drone finishing afterward.A great album with a genuis working with anolog tapes with is pretty hard to do probably because your working with tape.Anyways this is an essiential to own. Recommendations would be any Soft Machine album Third on up or Hugh Hopper for thr Riley influence.
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