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Thanks I'll Eat It Here


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Audio CD, September 14, 1993
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Frequently Bought Together

Thanks I'll Eat It Here + Little Feat + Sailin Shoes
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (September 14, 1993)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Warner Bros.
  • ASIN: B000002KIP
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #44,299 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. What Do You Want The Girl To Do
2. Honest Man
3. Two Trains
4. I Can't Stand The Rain
5. Cheek To Cheek
6. Easy Money
7. 20 Million Things
8. Find A River
9. Himmler's Ring
10. Heartache

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

Few musicians mirror Los Angeles's tradition of rock chameleons better than Lowell George, son of a Hollywood furrier and the brilliant, short-lived auteur that shaped Little Feat's '70s sound and fury before retreating to allow a more democratic if less gripping chemistry to surface. George's hearty but lyrical, blues-rimmed voice, signature electric slide guitar, and infectious, often surreal songs defined the band--as did his production on their pivotal mid-decade albums, which convinced more than a few listeners that they were Southerners. His 1979 solo album, recorded shortly before his untimely death, mixed new originals ("Honest Man," "Cheek to Cheek," "Himmler's Ring," and the touching "20 Million Things" among them) with smart R&B covers from Allen Toussaint ("What Do You Want the Girl to Do") and Ann Peebles ("I Can't Stand the Rain"), dressed in tight brass choruses and sleek backing choruses, and fit snugly with the Feat canon. --Sam Sutherland

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 45 customer reviews
This album showcases Lowell George's abilities as a vocalist of real talent and versatility.
KRITTIBAS DASGUPTA
I could not stop listening to this one back then and thank my lucky stars for always being able to tell good music from bad music.
Paul Bellocq
This is definitely one of the top 10 records to be released in 1979, & one of the best for it's time to listen to now.
Gregster

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By KRITTIBAS DASGUPTA on July 16, 1999
Format: Audio CD
This album showcases Lowell George's abilities as a vocalist of real talent and versatility. The arrangements are tight, the slide solos short but incisive. The songs vary between the pure New Orleans style of "What Do You Want The Girl to Do" and the brilliant rocking rendition of "Easy Money". Somewhere along the way, George shows us his introspective side in two gems - " Find a River" and "Twenty Million Things to Do". This is a feel-good album, with a really great musician at his expressive best.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By DJ Joe Sixpack HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on November 30, 2002
Format: Audio CD
I guess there are many Little Feat purists who aren't into this album... Their loss, really. I think it's Lowell George's best, most cohesive album, packed with heartfelt (and heartbrreaking) songs such as "20 Million Things To Do" "Find A River" a fine rendition of "Can't Stand The Rain" (which blows Tina Turner's version away) and the irresistible Mexican-flavored "Cheek To Cheek", with a beautiful, full-on mariachi band backing Lowell up on some of his most soaring vocal work. I usually find that even the best Little Feat albums fall apart at some point -- this 'solo' album, however, is much more focused and consistently enjoyable. He had such a great voice and such an infectious sense of fun and humor, all of which comes through loud and clear on this record, with great song after great song. The only bogus tune on it is "Himmler's Ring," but even it sounds easy on the ears. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED... a little-known late-'70s gem.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By James E. Rowe on September 9, 2005
Format: Audio CD
This really is an excellent album - I agree with past reviews of conflicting viewpoints. That is, it certainly sits well within the Little Feat canon and it is also very much outside of what I expected. Sleek backing vocals and brass arrangements as opposed to swamp funk across which Lowell is sliding his way to heaven. All said and done, love it. However, really had to let others know that 'Himmler's Ring' is a Jimmy Webb composition and as most would know, 'Can't stand the rain' is a Peebles song (and composition). There are only two fresh Lowell originals on the album (outside of Two Trains) and these are both co-compositions. The stunning '20 million things' with McGuinn (and temporarily Dylan) co-writer Jaques Levy and 'Cheek to Cheek' with Van Dyke Parks. Other tracks include compositions by Touissant and Fred Tackett. End o' the day, a lovely listen.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 28, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Having first listened to this album in the early 80's as a retrospective of Little Feat's explorations of the southern flavor of jazz-rock, I quickly became enamored with the ease and style that Lowell George brought to his art. The humor and grace found on Thanks, I'll eat it here, found its way into my regular listening rotation first on LP, then cassette, and finally CD. The Little Feat fans I turn on to this recording usually immediately order it for their own. The swing of What Do You Want the Girl to Do? has always served to cheer me up when I attempt to sing along with the trademark arpeggios that Lowell injects. Songs such as Two Trains Running, Can't Stand the Rain, and Easy Money (along with other versions by various artists) serve as a fantastic reference of how musical styles can be interpreted differently by artists. Overall, this album allows the listener to fall into Lowell's ecclectic interpretations, while simply having a fun time listening.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By P.J. Le Faucheur on September 26, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Nobody sounds like Lowell George. Bonnie Raitts slide guitar playing comes very close but as far as voices go nobody has the lusty, gritty , down home vocal qualities. I love Allen Toussaints version of "What do you want the girl to do?" but upon hearing Lowells version i quickly realised this song was just made for him. Perhaps i would've liked to have heard some more faster paced songs on this one (as it is very laidback) but nevertheless Lowell manages to cover everything from Tex-Mex ("Cheek to Cheek") to blues (Rikki Lee Jones's "Easy Money") to country ("20 million things to do")to R & B.(Ann Peebles's "I can't stand the rain").

"Two Trains" is done in the traditional Little Feat mode and is a masterpiece.

This c.d is a masterpiece. One of the best albums from 1979 when most folk were experiencing the punk era. I recall back in 1979 British Blues musician Alexis Korner (a.k.a. The Father of British Blues) played the album for weeks on his radio programme on BBC 2 (UK) partly in tribute to Lowell ,who had just passed away. Alexis KNEW about good music and only played what he considered essential. For me it stood out like a diamond in the rough back then and today it has the same effect on me. Sadly, it was Lowells last.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Crain on August 18, 2000
Format: Audio CD
A friend of mine just told me that he loved the Beatles more than the Stones because the Beatles had more geniuses in it. I went on to argue that this may not be such a good thing in the sense of a band because geniuses usually carry the band on their shoulder and when they burn out or die, the band suffers (the Beach Boys is a prime example). And while I've been torn at just how much of a musical genius he was, Lowell George certainly had to carry Little Feat for a few years and when he crashed and burned, the band suffered. And while the Feat moved from an awesome blues-rock band to a less inspired but still highly listenable jazz-rock band and then returned in the late 80s and 90s with a vengence, when Lowell slipped away, his presence was sorely missed. This, his only solo album, was supposedly pieced together for a couple of years and works very, very well. I fell that the stuff on this album is basically what Little Feat would have sounded like had he been able to keep it together with his own band. But Lowell George seems to hone in on a little Ry Cooder territory when he begins to branch out with delicious oddities such as "Himmler's Ring" and "Cheek to Cheek." Thanks, I'll Eat it Here (which was the original title for Sailin' Shoes, as you have probably heard) IS the Last Record Album for Little Feat, if not in name then in spirit.
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