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All That Glittered (Onyx) Paperback – July 1, 1991


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Paperback, July 1, 1991
$87.42 $0.01
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Series: Onyx
  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Onyx (July 1, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451402758
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451402752
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,179,081 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Turner, who met the late Florence Ballard when he was 12, became a combination mascot and confidant to the Supremes and their entourage during the glory years of Motown. PW called this "a sometimes appealing, occasionally tedious story" unfortunately flawed by "gratuitously mean-spirited" Diana Ross bashing. Photos.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Befriended at age 12 by Supremes member Florence Ballard, Turner embarked on an odyssey that took him from his Harlem neighborhood into the jet-setting glamour world of one of the most popular black singing groups of all time. In colloquial, gossipy style, he relates numerous tales of his life as an unofficial aide-de-camp to the group, but especially to the talented but ill-starred Ballard. And a sad, depressing story it is. Turner's young eyes and ears took in all the bitter, behind-the-scenes machinations, especially those that brought about the end of Ballard's participation in the group, her plunge into poverty, and her untimely death. Motown mogul Berry Gordy, superstar Diana Ross, and third original member Mary Wilson are covered by anything but glory in this book which, despite a sometimes awkward writing style, will merit consideration by public libraries and comprehensive music collections. Previewed in Prepub Alert, 6/1/90; see also Ben Fong-Torres and Dave Marsh's The Motown Album , reviewed in this issue, p. 90.--Ed.
- David M. Turkalo, Social Law Lib., Boston
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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See all 27 customer reviews
I had fun reading it.
C. Martinez
And isn't it funny that as "close" to Florence as Turner claims .... there are NO pictures of she and with Florence?
Ronny Marshall
It sounded as though he was one of the "users" that he mentions in his book.
Garby Gable

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Ronny Marshall on February 7, 2011
Format: Paperback
I was lucky and had a friend send me this book so I didn't have to line the pockets of Miss Turner.

It's interesting to note, that during the book La Turner "quotes" Florence refering to Diana Ross as "Diana" and not "Diane" which was her known name by her friends and you can even hear interviews with Florence calling her "Diane".

And isn't it funny that as "close" to Florence as Turner claims .... there are NO pictures of she and with Florence?
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By JT on November 5, 2002
Format: Paperback
Obviously Miss Tony needed money so she/he told us an entertaining story filled with inaccurate gossipy information. One thing he/she did hit on was the fact that Mary Wilson was very two-faced when it came to Flo. I grew up near the Brewster projects and trust me Diana is not the only one with issues.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 29, 2001
Format: Paperback
i thought bull...when i first picked up the book and read the back cover...i read the first chapter and could not put it down...for one it is well written and at times gripping...personally i truly enjoyed the book...tony made his recollections of flo ballard seem as if you were with them having a good time...me...i am good for trashing a book and refusing to go past the first few pages if it does not hold me...this book is good....go get it!!!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 8, 1999
Format: Paperback
Many times I would sit in Mr. Turners kitchen in his N.Y. home listening to stories of the girls. His memory is photographic, his detail and story telling are riveting. This is the closest to Florence Ballards story anyone will ever get. I have seen his scrap books, photos and more. In fact Mary Wilson finished her "Dreamgirl" book in his home. My conversations with Cindy Birdsong made Mr. Turners book concrete fact. A definite book for all Supremes admirers.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Big L.A. Fan on January 18, 2000
Format: Paperback
How exciting it must have been to have known Florence Ballard the way Tony did. His experiences with Flo, Mary, and the other one were incredibly great reading. I have been a Supremes fan forever it seems, and this has to be the most insightful book I have read about them yet. The way that Flo handled herself at such a young age may have been misguided, but she stood up for herself, and not at the expense of others. Throughout the book I felt that Tony showed what life at Motown was really like, and if you weren't willing to play the game, you got burned. A must read for any Supremes fan, especially those with a warm spot for Florence.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 30, 2001
Format: Paperback
This was THE book that was supposed to take the lid off the secret SUPREMES. While it delivers in the sense that it offers
up some juicy bits of backstage gossip, it sheds no new light on
the rise and eventual fall of the legendary girl group. The
first two thirds of the book gather momentum at breakneck speed
only to stall in the last chapters. The famous third act curse.
Berry Gordy was the brains. Diana Ross did what she was told.
Mary Wilson partied and boyfriended her way around the world.Flo
Ballard whined and drank.Curtain.The end.What's missing is the
"final" final chapter on Florence Ballard. Briefly addressed in
the book, Flo Ballard did NOT die broke. She agreed to a "secret"
settlement with "someone" and was well on her way to her former
lifestyle. If Mr. Turner was the fixture in her life he'd have us
believe, he should have REALLY delved into that. Where was he then? Someone should write a book about the real egomaniac who
caused all the trouble. It wasn't Ross. How about a REAL Mary Wilson book?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Garby Gable on March 28, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have read a lot of books about the Supremes and Motown and thought that this would be an interesting and edifying read, however I think it was just a lot of made up gossip. I believe Tony Turner met the Supremes and may have befriended Flo in some way, but it is very hard to believe that a grown woman would frequently call a young boy and update him on what she and her Motown sisters were doing, in addition to sharing with him whatever scandals may or may not have occured.

I also think that it is very sad that Tony took personal things the Supremes may have shared with him and made it public. It sounded as though he was one of the "users" that he mentions in his book. Cutting school and spending your money on clothes so that you can look good and attend concerts featuring the Supremes sounds like he may have had some serious self esteem issues.

I was turned off by many things he said and doubt that most of it is 100% true. I have met Mary Wilson and it doesn't ring true that she would have done or said many of the things he alleges in his diary of misinformation.

I can only recommend reading this if you like reading fantasy!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 26, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Tony Turner writes a fascinating portrait of his life as a Supremes "groupie". I enjoyed his vivid descriptions of their glamourous style with shock and laughter, especially the shopping sprees of which he was an eager participant and eyewitness. While I admire the talent of these female pioneers of Black popular music, I also feel sorry for them because of the way they broke up, the shattering of their friendship the tragic death of Florence Ballard, and the double-crossing tactics of Motown administration in the early days. These women needed better management in their music career, and proper education about their own finances to avoid being fleeced out of their hard-earned money. Although I have big problems with the raunchy lyrics and sexual overtones in present-day rap and R&B, I'm glad to see more young Black performers handling their business and taking control of their careers, which the Supremes didn't have. I will always admire the Supremes for their music,as well as being examples of African-American beauty and poise during a decade where we were told we were less than beautiful.
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