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All the Art That's Fit to Print (And Some That Wasn't): Inside The New York Times Op-Ed Page Hardcover – November 6, 2008


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press (November 6, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780231138246
  • ISBN-13: 978-0231138246
  • ASIN: 0231138245
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 9.2 x 11.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,141,450 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The enduring relevance of the New York Times op-ed illustrations are explicated with literary flair by Kraus, a former art director of the page, who contends that the groundbreaking pictures changed the very purpose and potential of illustrations... to stir the political and cultural pot. Episodic essays accompanied by illustrations re-create the battles between art directors and editors that have raged since the Times created the world's first op-ed page in 1970. The works of famous Times illustrators like Brad Holland and Roland Topor, are enriched by Kraus's presentation of the controversies associated with their publication or rejection. The book serves as a chronicle of late 20th-century history, replete with sardonic images of tyrants and visual commentaries on the fall of communism; the works of Eastern Europeans who fled totalitarian regimes are some of the most challenging and resonant. In this overflowing treasure chest of ideas, politics and cultural critiques, Kraus proves that art is dangerous and sometimes necessarily so. 306 illus. (Nov.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From School Library Journal

Art is not the first thing that comes to mind when one thinks of the New York Times, but it appears to play a very important journalistic role in communicating editorial ideas, even at a subconscious level. Kraus, an art director at the Times for 30 years, provides a detailed analysis of the art on the Op-Ed page, from its inception in 1970 to today. The 306 images are arranged by decade, and the text is divided into short sections that focus on a variety of themes related to the images, the artists, and editorial practices. Kraus draws on her 13 years as the art director of the Op-Ed page to share an insider's view of the editorial and political processes of the newspaper and includes several images that were never published in the Times. Using text and images, she shares her passion for visual communication. Readers will be entertained and come away with a deeper appreciation of the power of illustration. This book belongs in public libraries that subscribe to the Times and in most academic libraries.—Judy Solberg, Seattle Univ. Lib.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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I was so intrigued that I read it straight through last weekend.
Arthur Dworin
The book is such fun to read--it's loaded with facts and anecdotes about world events as well as biographical information about artists we want to know about.
Elaine Clayton
It is beautifuly designed and of course many of the illustrations are knock outs!
Jonathan Bauch

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Elaine Clayton on November 24, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is a fascinating and exciting book about the power of editorial illustration and all the political events the art covers. Not only does this book allow readers to get an almost tactile experience with the process and creation of OpEd art, it also let's us in on the intrigue surrounding scenarios which unfolded once the art was delivered. The book is such fun to read--it's loaded with facts and anecdotes about world events as well as biographical information about artists we want to know about. Reading about the way in which art was perceived by editors at the New York Times is utterly the most enjoyable and humorous thing about the book because art was turned down for often such absurd reasons. The art in this book is incredible--and the book reveals how potent art and visual communication is in our society. Jerelle Kraus shows us how art takes us places and yet how misunderstood it can be. Reading this book, I feel I just took a great ride through art and culture. Jerelle Kraus has masterfully taken us on an amazing adventure and has written a beautiful and enormously important book!
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By John Montorio on December 16, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Clearly, Op-Ed art became a way of visually expressing serious
thinking that forever changed the way we communicate. And for the
better. By airing the aesthetic and editorial debates that shaped this
synergy of art and commentary, and bringing to life the wildly
eccentric and idiosyncratic cast of characters behind it, Kraus does a
real service to anyone interested in the written word and its visual
interpretation. Her book -- like the art it examines -- absorbs,
excites, provokes, repels, inspires, entertains and, ultimately,
enlightens. And from my vantage point as a former managing editor of
of the Los Angeles Times and associate managing editor of The New
York Times, where I worked with the author, I think it deserves to
be on every journalist's required reading list.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Android Jackson on December 15, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Jerelle Kraus has assembled a tour de force volume that chronicles, illustrates, illuminates and entertains. This multi-talented woman is an artist in her own right, who shepherded the work of some of the foremost illustrators of our time through the minefield that is the editorial process at America's newspaper of record. For years, she was the den mother to some of our most talented and visually witty illustrators, as she worked from her ioffice as art director for the NY Times' Op Ed page.

Now she gives us the back story -- the biographies of artists, the Freudian obsessions of some editors, the wit and wisdom that it takes to pull off such an amazing job that is fraught with politics -- in every sense of the word -- day in and day out for years on end. That Kraus could perform this feat, maintain her senses of style, poise, and humor throughout, and then sit down and write this fascinating book is a testament to her own great talent. Bravo!
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Arthur Dworin on November 21, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Nothing tops this for sheer beauty and outrageous insider anecdotes. I was so intrigued that I read it straight through last weekend. The writing is authoritative, humorous, and stylish; and the pictures on every page are compelling and gorgeous. This book will forever grace my coffee table.

I learned how the world's first Op-Ed page began and that Times Op-Ed art was exhibited in the Louvre but not the U.S. The author's 3 hours alone with Richard Nixon is hilarious, and the struggles between editors and artists are riveting.

As Bill Maher blurbs, "To discover what really goes on inside the belly of the media beast, read 'All the Art That's Fit to Print.' The 'Some That Wasn't' are never-published illustrations censored by Times poobahs and revealed here for the first time."

This classy, inexpensive, coffee-table book is my gift this year to each of my relatives and friends.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Catherine on December 31, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This book provides a unique, insider's view of the creation of the New York Times Op-Ed page and the editors, writers and artists who brought it to life. It provides eye-opening accounts of some of the Times' top editors, with descriptions of some very large egos as well as generous and visionary personalities. In addition, there are hundreds of intelligent, spot-on political illustrations that could be a book in themselves. The most moving sections to me were the descriptions of Eastern European illustrators who risked both personal freedom and safety with the publication of their drawings. There is much more to the Op-Ed page than meets the eye, and this important book brings you that story.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Sean Kelly on December 11, 2009
Format: Hardcover
"All the Art That's Fit to Print (And Some That Wasn't)" is the smartest and most entertaining book about the intersection of art, journalism and politics.

Jerelle Kraus has always been an extraordinary inspiration to countless artists, art directors and designers. (A recent book-launch party for Jerelle was a star-studded event.) The creative choices she's made and the iconic images she's brought to life are hugely influential.

This behind-the-scenes and between-the-pages look at the creative and editorial processes offers a great education.

Worldly, witty and wise, Jerelle Kraus has produced a passionate promotion for the power of pictures.
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