Buy Used
$6.98
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used book in good condition. This book contains no highlighting or writing. Thank you for looking at this book. There's a spot on the outside edge.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The 10 Lenses: Your Guide to Living and Working in a Multicultural World (Capital Ideas for Business & Personal Development) Paperback – October 1, 2001


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$4.29 $0.01

Notable New Titles in Business & Money
Browse a selection of featured new business & money titles.

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A tough-minded look at a potentially soft subject." -- Fast Company<br /><br />"Buy it and become a better person." -- Jack Covert, Inside Business<br /><br />"By learning the strengths and weaknesses of those lenses . . . we can better understand interpersonal relations in diverse groups." -- Business Reader Review<br /><br />"He does a thorough job, seeking to stress the positive and negative inherent in each approach..." -- Richard Pachter, Knight Ridder<br /><br />"The key to understanding why discrimination and prejudice are still widespread . . ." -- Denver Post<br /><br />"Williams presents an innovative, research-based method for turning cultural differences into competitive advantage." --Atlanta Business Journal

About the Author

Mark Williams is the founder of MarkusWorks, an interactive media company whose mission is to help individuals, organizations and communities better manage pressing issues related to human relationships and human identity in today's global environment. Mark also served as founder and CEO of The Diversity Channel that developed eLearning, training and education services for businesses, organizations and government agencies. Mark has provided coaching and education to such Fortune 500 companies as UNISYS, Avon, American Express, Marriott International, Microsoft, Sara Lee, Colgate Palmolive, Cisco Systems, Hearst Communications, Johnson and Johnson, Merck, Office Depot, Exxon Mobil, and Chevron Texaco; the Central Intelligence Agency, the United States Navy, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Merck and Harvard Medical School. He has been quoted widely in business publications such as Fast Company, Black Enterprise, and in The Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle, and Chicago Tribune. He has appeared as a guest on national television programs including Bloomberg News, CBS’s The Early Show, and the CNN Financial News Network. Mark is the author of The 10 Lenses: Your Guide to Living and Working in a Multicultural World (Capital Books, 2001) and Your Identity Zones (Capital, 2004).
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Capital Ideas for Business & Personal Development
  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Capital Books; 1 edition (October 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1892123592
  • ISBN-13: 978-1892123596
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #508,034 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Keith Appleyard on December 3, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is a useful Guide to Living as & Working with Immigrants in a Multicultural USA, not a Multicultural World. It really has little or no street-credibility outside the USA.
I've worked for a US Fortune500 Company for 20 years, and in over 30 Countries.
The book confesses upfront to its limitations : although the information is US-centric, Williams, Clifton & Thomas believe their concepts are universal - but they haven't the experience to back that up. They admit they don't know whether current observations will hold up in different cultures, or whether different cultures have different profiles with respect to the lenses. The initial research has focussed on race, culture, nationality & ethnicity. In practice 90% of its focus is on race & ethnicity. Sexual orientation is ignored, and the word 'gay' doesn't appear until over 80% of the way through the book - and its only for one sentence.
Consider some of the Lenses :
For the Assimilationist they talk about "adapting US business norms appropriately, given global norms and standards" - well I've never met a "Global norm" - and as for being able to adapt US norms, there's the problem - you have to reject US norms in order to get on with the outside world. The Assimilationist must think about "Western cultural arrogance" - woah - what about "US Cultural arrogance" - ask a Canadian or a Mexican or the French how they feel about US hegemony.
The Culturalcentrist talks about the "Irish, Polish & Italian Communities", and in the same breath about the "Asian Community" - I'm sure the "Asians" would argue they had less in common between India, Vietnam, Korea etc than those Europeans, who at least had Catholicism in common.
For the Seclusionist : "Globalisation ...
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 9, 2001
Format: Paperback
"The Ten Lenses" is a badly needed breath of fresh air -- a sophisticated, intellectually grounded, and constructive framework for thinking about diversity issues. It respects and values all people and all perspectives on diversity. It opens a path to understanding each different perspective, even those dramatically different from one's own. It helps take the emotional charge out of verbal interactions between people whose approaches and reactions to diversity issues are widely divergent. It provides a new framework and a new language through which we can talk about diversity and move towards greater understanding. "The Ten Lenses" was an enormous help to me and I highly recommend it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 7, 2001
Format: Paperback
I live and work in Washington, D.C., one of the most diverse cities in America. My department at work was having a lot of problems due to such a diverse workforce. We could not communicate well and our projects were never completed on time and never completed correctly. My boss brought this book in one day after he stayed up all night reading it. He could not put "The 10 Lenses" down. In a very short time, my department has turned itself around using the premises in this book. If you want to have a successful business, buy "The 10 Lenses."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David Bentz on December 15, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is, in many ways a set of ten stereotypes we can view people through. Williams says that if we identify the Lens/stereotypes that people fit into we will be better able to manage them and get them to contribute to the goals of our companies or keep them as loyal customers. He ends with he own new-age theology, the Eleventh Lens, in what sounds like a combination of the Buddhist thought and the way of the Jedi from Star Wars. This book might be helpful to a business manager who hadn't thought much about diversity, but I found it very unhelpful and wouldn't recommend it to anyone.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again