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The 100-Mile Diet: A Year of Local Eating Hardcover – International Edition


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Canada; First edition (March 12, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679314822
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679314820
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,373,953 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Nothing you eat will look the same! This inspiring and enlightening book will give you plenty to chew on.”
—Deborah Madison, author of Local Flavors: Cooking and Eating from America’s Farmers’ Markets

The 100-Mile Diet is inspiring in its honest striving to discover what has been all but lost.”
The Gazette (Montreal)

“Engaging, thoughtful essays packed with natural, historical and personal detail.”
The New York Times

“A highly readable, sometimes funny, and very personal book–with just the right nutrient content of hard fact to balance the spice of memoir.”
Times Colonist (Victoria)


From the Trade Paperback edition.

About the Author

Alisa Smith, a Vancouver-based freelance writer who has been nominated for a National Magazine Award, has been published in Outside, Explore, Canadian Geographic, Reader’s Digest, Utne, and many other periodicals. The books Way Out There and Liberalized feature her work.

J.B. MacKinnon is the author of Dead Man in Paradise, which won the 2006 Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-fiction. His feature reportage on issues ranging from African prisons to anarchism in America has earned three National Magazine Awards.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Trenzy on January 8, 2008
Format: Paperback
This very personal account is a very inspiring and motivational book. While reading this, I couldn't stop telling people about the ideas, the stories and the passion of what i was reading. I checked the local farm market schedule midway through the book and am very excited to be going this week.

I think some other people are missing the point. This book isn't trying to convert everyone to a local diet. They don't always make the most environmentally friendly decisions, but it's the connection with the food and where it comes from, that's what is the moral of this story.

Between knowing your own fisherman, to making your own salt... to just knowing the season of what is fresh and local. The simple concept of 'who knows what asparagus season is' hit home... and I immediately downloaded the local crops information.

Too often, we are trying to cut spending and we hurt for it. Paying good money for good food is something definately worthwhile. I'm not going to pickle my vegetables, and live on beets for the winter... but it's a story that really makes me question what I'm eating, and where it comes from.

Consequently, I haven't been to a fast food place since reading this. Much better of an argument for me than fast food nation, or supersize this. The was truly a gem.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J. Elay on June 10, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I loved this book. I think it's a must read for anyone who is interested in local eating because it debunks the myth that it's impossible for people in northern climates. If you are interested in becoming a "locavore", I suggest reading this book along with "Animal, Vegetable, Mineral" by Barbara Kingsolver, "Omnivore's Dilemma" by Michael Pollan, and "Full Moon Feast" by Jessica Prentice.

The problem I had with the other books is that I found them to be negative towards vegetarians and vegans. So you can imagine my excitement when I found out that Alisa Smith and J.B. MacKinnon were vegetarians! However, they gave that up before beginning the project. That was really disappointing to me and I would have liked this book more if they had at least given it an honest try before eating meat. That's why I give it 4 stars instead of 5. Otherwise, a good and fun read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By momoftwo on December 30, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I loved this book and have re-read it several times. I like how the couple wanted to eat locally but were practical about the impractibility of it all at times. I like how it switched back and forth between the two people. I think it is an inspriational book for anyone who wants to reduce their carbon footprint.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
While this book was a pleasant enough read, I found myself not really caring about the authors, as their personalities and stories were not as woven in as I would expect in a memoir. There is some basic information about local eating in here, but overall, this book is sadly lacking in comparison to other local eating narratives (for example, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Kingsolver). The authors also regularly began a personal narrative only to abandon it and leave the reader in the dark as to how the personal challenge was resolved. Overall, this one is skippable.
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