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Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
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The 21 Lessons of Merlyn: A Study in Druid Magic and Lore Paperback – September 8, 2002


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The 21 Lessons of Merlyn: A Study in Druid Magic and Lore + The Lost Books of Merlyn: Druid Magic from the Age of Arthur + The Deepteachings of Merlyn
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Llewellyn Publications; 1st edition (September 8, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0875424961
  • ISBN-13: 978-0875424965
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (195 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #267,504 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

There is a great deal that has been written about the ancient Celts. This is especially true among the Pagan community because many find that the myths and legends of the Celts strike a chord that rings true.
Sometimes, however, it is possible to see things backwards. By that I mean that because you do something a particular way today, you assume that the ancients did it either the same way or in a similar fashion. Ah, if only it were so!
That simply isn't good history. You have to get good information, not make assumptions. That's why I am very enthused with Douglas Monroe's The 21 Lessons of Merlyn.
When you read this book you will see that it was written by a person who is both a scholar and a bard. He instructs by way of stories, making the purpose and method of the philosophies, exercises, and magical rituals crystal clear and easy to apply, yet not limiting his brilliant research and scholarship. In fact, the teachings in this book are based on a manuscript which is now in the private collection of the Albion Lodge of the United Ancient Order of Druids of Oxford.
One of the things I really like is the traditional Druid triads, concepts that are broken down into thee short sentences. For example, the Three Virtues of Wisdom are to be aware of all things, to endure all things, and to be removed from all things. The three spiritual instructors of mankind are mastery of self, master of world, and mastery of unknown. You'll learn many of these and be able to discover how they are spiritually and practically meaningful in your life.
There is so much great material in this book that I can't say enough about it! Already, more than 120,000 people are using this book. If you want to find out what the Druids really did, and put it to use in your life, get this book.

About the Author

Douglas Monroe has been involved in practical Earth magick since his first apprenticeship at age 10. As a boy , he studied classical Magic under the guidance of Israel Regardie, and has studied and taught in the United States, in Britain, and in Argentina. He is founder of the New Forest Centre for Magickal Studies and has made many excursions to Celtic Britain to collect original materials on Druidism and Arthurian Lore. His Method of teaching - here seemingly presented as tales of magic and adventure - has many precedents in the Wisdom Teachings of the East and West, but most truly in the Druidic Tradition that he has followed, and of which he is a foremost exponent.

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Customer Reviews

The book is written very well.
Ayris
After reading it, I can find no merit in the lies told in the text, and it is clear that the author is just out to make money.
Laurel
It claims to be "authentic" Druidism, yet it is based on the Book of Pheryllt and Barddas, both known forgeries.
Ceisiwr Serith

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 34 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 17, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book, while certainly amusing, does not border on the "truth" of anything, be it historical druidic practices, modern druidism, or even spiritual enlightenment. For instance, if Monroe is so enlightened, why does he claim that women are less spiritually evolved than men? If he's so enlightened, why does he spend so much time criticizing the Christian faith? Certainly, some one who was *truly* spiritually advanced needn't spend so much time bashing other people's faiths. Monroe's knowledge of other topics is also sadly lacking. He advocates the ingesting of mistletoe (eating one berry has been known to cause fatalities among children, and the oil of mistletoe is even more potent still). Also, if you put wormwood (which can cause miscarriage in pregnant women, though he neglects to mention that) in vodka, it creates a substance known as "absinthe" which can get you jailed for a few years *for merely OWNING,* let alone drinking, the substance.
All in all, I found this book to be a highly misinformed work, both historically, medicinally, and spiritually. If you're looking for some good works on the Druids, try reading a work from the historical section, or at the very least, *do not* read this book. Unless, of course, you're not looking for any amount of intelligence in the books you read.
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37 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Z. Walters on July 20, 2004
Format: Paperback
I have a copy of this book as well as it's sequel. I keep them for the express purpose of showing them to people and warning them not to buy them. There are plenty of reviews that explain why, but I will touch on the main themes and their fallacies.

1. The author claims that only men may be druids. (any quick skimming of Irish or Welsh mythology will produce at least one druidess.)

2. The druids were vegetarians. (a documented ritual called the tarb-feis is performed by eating the flesh of a freshly slain bull and sleeping on it's hide, not to mention the overwhelming presence of archaeological evidence of animal sacrifice and feasting)

3. Druids were celibate. (again, a quick skim of Celtic mythology reveals many sons and daughters of druids)

I won't get into the multitude of other lies that are in this book, as they have been covered elsewhere. I will end by saying that one value we do know that the druids held was Truth. Monroe has this right, at least. However, he has shamed me and my ancestors by claiming this drivel to be truth. Perhaps this book was all a free-energy scheme for Monroe; after all, my forefathers are spinning in their graves fast enough to generate electricity.
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141 of 175 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 3, 1999
Format: Paperback
"The 21 lessons of Merlyn" tells a good story, but is historically inaccurate. For starters, the Druids came from Ireland in 1000BC...not from Atlantis in 400BC. Easter and the Yule Log are Germanic, not Pagan AND the kissing under the mistletoe tradition is Scandinavian. Also Ogham is not a symbolic magical alphabet. The druids did not practice celibacy to achieve new heights. There were many powerful beings (Mohammad), who had many wives and children.
The fact the many people see this book as a genuine resource on druidism is what bothers me the most. This book is based on the works of Iolo Morganwg (The Book of Pheryllt) which are proven forgeries. To those people, I must say...read more reliable books. There are many books available at Amazon.com that give a more accurate view on the history of the druids and Celtic lore. Look for resources that do not refer to the book of Pheryllt or "The Lost works of the Druids". Such things don't exist. Druids wrote very little about themselves. They didn't beleive in writing down their beleifs (especially magick spells and medicine).
The authors view of women is also very disturbing. Yes, women were druids AND female druids could achieve just as much as male druids. The author puts female Celts in a negative view.
I neglected to give this book 1 star because the author tells a very creative fictional story of Merlyn and Author. Monroe managed to keep this book interesting throughout. He just needs to find more reliable resources. I hear his second book "The Lost Books of Merlyn" makes up for this one by being more historically accurate, however, I make no claims since I have not read it.
I can not recommend this book because it is sexist content and inaccurate views of druidism.
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35 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Doug on December 22, 1999
Format: Paperback
As a modern-day student of Druidry, I cannot recommend this book, it is full of gross inaccuracies; to name two: (1) Monroe states that pumpkins were a "sacred plant" of the Druids, however pumpkins are indigenous to North America and were utterly unknown to the ancient Celts; (2) he recommends the ingestion of mistletoe -- mistletoe is a very toxic plant, and should *NOT!* be ingested in any form. I would recommend "The Apple Branch" by Alexei Kondratiev, also on this site, and books in its bibliography for those interested.
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52 of 63 people found the following review helpful By S. parker on January 9, 2001
Format: Paperback
21 Lessons Of Merlin is the biggest hindance to the revival of Celtic Paganism and Druidry out there today. The book is historically inaccurate in almost every detail, and spiritually innacurate in ways that make it a real danger to honest students. Once you've read a half-dozen good books on celtic ways you might want to give this a look. The author *does* manage to craft some interesting rituals, but the basis for them, and the theology behind them, is just horrid.
Ian
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