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The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for Persons with Alzheimer Disease, Related Dementing Illnesses, and Memory Loss in Later Life (3rd Edition) Mass Market Paperback – November 1, 2006


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 624 pages
  • Publisher: Grand Central Life & Style (November 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446618764
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446618762
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 4.1 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (94 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #251,115 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Nancy L. Mace, M.A., now retired, was a consultant to, and a member of, the board of directors of the Alzheimer Association and an assistant in psychiatry as coordinator of the T. Rowe and Eleanor Price Teaching Service of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Peter V. Rabins, M.D., M.P.H., is a professor of psychiatry, with joint appointments in medicine, mental hygiene and health policy and management, director of the geriatric neuropsychiatry section, and director of the T. Rowe and Eleanor Price Teaching Service of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

PROFESSIONAL ENDORSMENT: THE 36-HOUR DAY is endorsed by the Alzheimer Disease And Related Disorders Association Of America


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Customer Reviews

I would highly recommend reading this book--it's easy to understand and very informative.
satisfied user
The most important thing that the book and other's that have been through it will you don't be afriad to ask!!!
Colleen Chupp
This book is very informative and gives resource information for you to get help as the dementia progresses.
Cheryl B. Smith

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By G. M. Matthews on February 28, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
If you have a family member or friend that is showing signs of dimentia, you owe it to yourself to read this book. It's not easy to read, because the subject is a hard one if you are exposed to someone with diminishing mental functions, but that's not the books fault. I have read about 40% of it, and have already learned more than I have in all of my other research on the Internet and in reading a couple of other books and talking to many people. It's well written, the language is easy to read (even if the subject matter is difficult to face), and it provides factual information that is entirely relevant. There is a chapter that explains many of the behavior changes you may face, with excellent suggestions on how to deal with each of them. Most sound like common sense once you read them, some are counterintuitive, but I believe all are more effective than what I had been doing. Knowing the most loving responses to a situation doesn't always give you the ability to implement them in the moment, but knowing is better than ignorance. Parts of this book are worth reading a few times, as you learn and try things and come back and review what's working and what isn't in re-reading the key parts of the book. I highly recommend the book.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 10, 1997
Format: Hardcover
This book, the 36 Hour Day, not only tells you ABOUT Alzheimer's, but it EXPLAINS how it affects the person with the disease, but also the family and the caregiver. If anyone you know is dealing with the terrible truths of this disease, recommend that they READ THIS BOOK!!!!!!!!!! Nicole
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Sean W. Scott on April 28, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am an elder law attorney who helps clients who are going through the process of Alzheimer's disease. I often give this book out to my clients who just don't seem to know what to do next. When faced with this devistating disease process you cannot hope to know what is coming or how to even begin to deal with it all. This book helps...alot. In my opinion this book should be mandatory reading. I give it 5 stars and strongly encourage you to get this book.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Ellen Potts on October 2, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book is a wonderful resource for caregivers for Alzheimer's or dementia patients. It stresses the need to enter the patient's world, rather than trying to "reorient" them to reality, which does not work. It is filled with practical tips on how to deal with the common issues caregivers face: wandering, combativeness, eating, agitation, etc. I highly recommend it to anyone who has been placed in the role of dementia caregiver.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Moondeer on February 15, 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Though this book has many good parts, but it is not the one to start with and definitely not the one for people whose loved one has mild cognitive impairment. Alzheimer's comes in stages. This book ignores this and puts everything that could possibly go wrong in single chapters like "Problems in Independent Living". Let me give you an example from this chapter. Under the part "When an impaired person can no longer manage their money, it starts with the sentence "The impaired person may be unable to balance her checkbook, she may be unable to make change, or she may become irresponsible with her money." It seems that not balancing one's checkbook is on par with not being able to make change which is on par with being irresponsible with money. That's an enormous jump in one sentence. Then it gives examples of people being irresponsible with their money. Shortly there's what to do if you have to take the person's checkbook against their wishes. I know a caregiver who has taken this to heart, and removed a person's checkbook because she took a little long to figure out how to pay her bills and hadn't remembered to balance her checkbook for a few months, instead of offering her help, and doing the most to let her keep her independence and dignity.

Early in the chapter on "Characteristic Behavior Symptoms of Dementia is "Because the brain itself is damaged, the person has a severely limited to learn things and understand explanations." Which jumps to "It is futile to expect him to remember or learn and frustrating to both of you to try to teach him."

I agree, one should not "expect" but step inside the person with Alzheimer's who wants to retain as much dignity and independence as possible. The brain is a mystery even to the experts.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mompeef on August 8, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a very comprehensive, well-written basic resource for anyone who wants to be better informed about dementia. It is equally appropriate for laypeople concerned about a loved one with dementia, or health/ mental health professionals working with such clientele. It has a little something for everyone, and covers a wide range of subject matter.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Martin A Hogan HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on July 1, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
When our family first learned that our Mother had Alzheimer disease, we were devastated. After we all read "The 36-Hour Day", there was a great deal of relief. Although Alzhemier and other dementing illnesses can seem catastrophic, this book reads like a freindly family doctor givng you straight forward, no-nonsense advice. It covers all aspects of dealing with the family member, from explaining just what dementia is and how it can appear, to how you can deal with it appropriately without losing your patience or embarrasing your family member. Medical help, daily care, medical problems, behavior, mood, legal issues, common compassion and basic 'rules of thumb' are thoroughly covered. Several "examples" of previous family incidents are mentioned with thoughts on how to address each and every one. Great care has been crafted into this book and I highly recommend it. You will feel better, thus making the family member you are helping feel better.
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