Start reading The Adjacent on the free Kindle Reading App or on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

The Adjacent [Kindle Edition]

Christopher Priest
3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)

Digital List Price: $9.99 What's this?
Print List Price: $24.99
Kindle Price: $8.69
You Save: $16.30 (65%)

Whispersync for Voice

Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration. Add narration for a reduced price of $3.47 after you buy the Kindle book.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $8.69  
Hardcover $18.29  
Paperback $13.46  
Audible Audio Edition, Unabridged $30.95 or Free with Audible 30-day free trial
Kindle Delivers
Kindle Delivers
Subscribe to the Kindle Delivers monthly e-mail to find out about each month's Kindle book deals, new releases, editors' picks and more. Learn more (U.S. customers only)

Book Description

The eagerly anticipated new novel from “one of the master illusionists of our time.” (Wired)

In the near future, Tibor Tarent, a freelance photographer, is recalled from Anatolia to Britain when his wife, an aid worker, is killed—annihilated by a terrifying weapon that reduces its target to a triangular patch of scorched earth. 

A century earlier, Tommy Trent, a stage magician, is sent to the Western Front on a secret mission to render British reconnaissance aircraft invisible to the enemy.

Present day. A theoretical physicist develops a new method of diverting matter, a discovery with devastating consequences that will resonate through time.


Editorial Reviews

Review

The Adjacent is puzzling, brilliant, frustrating, page-turning, disturbing and absorbing. WERTZONE A beautifully written novel. SCI FI NOW Thoroughly engrossing, and throughout Priest's scene-setting is impeccable. His descriptions of the workings of Bomber Command in the WWII section are worthy of Len Deighton. In the futuristic strand, he uses his flat, clinical prose to good effect to create a mood of oppressive menace. STARBURST MAGAZINE

About the Author

Christopher Priest's novels have built him an inimitable dual reputation as a contemporary novelist and a leading figure in modern SF and fantasy. His novel THE PRESTIGE is unique in winning both a major literary prize (THE JAMES TAIT BLACK AWARD and a major genre prize THE WORLD FANTASY AWARD); THE SEPARATION won both the ARTHUR C. CLARKE and the BRITISH SCIENCE FICTION AWARDs. He was selected for the original BEST OF YOUNG BRITISH NOVELISTS in 1983.

Product Details

  • File Size: 1323 KB
  • Print Length: 429 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0575105364
  • Publisher: Titan Books (April 8, 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00F8EYVOY
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #89,100 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unsettling, intelligent, unnerving, brilliant June 22, 2013
Format:Hardcover
A century or more in the future, Melanie Tarent is killed in a terrorist attack in Turkey by a frightening new weapon. The only trace the weapon leaves behind is a triangular scorch mark on the ground. Her husband, Tibor, returns home to Britain and learns that the same weapon has been deployed on a larger scale in London, leaving a hundred thousand people dead. There appears to be a connection to something in Tibor's past, something he has no memory of.

The events in Tibor's life have ramifications across the years. During WWI a stage magician is sent to the Western Front to help make British reconnaissance aircraft invisible to the enemy and has a chance meeting with one of the most famous writers alive. During WWII a young RAF technician meets a female Polish pilot and learns of her desperate desire to return home and be reunited with her missing lover. And in the English countryside of the near future, a scientist creates the first adjacency, and transforms the world.

Reviewing a Christopher Priest novel is like trying to take a photograph of a car speeding past you at 100mph without any warning. You are, at the very best, only going to capture an indistinct and vague image of what the object is. Photography, perspective and points of view play a major role in Priest's latest novel, as do some of his more familiar subjects: stage magic, WWII aircraft and the bizarre world of the Dream Archipelago. The Adjacent is a mix of the familiar and the strange, the real and the unreal, the lucid and the dreamlike. It's the novel as a puzzle, as so many of Priest's books are, except that Priest hasn't necessarily given you all the pieces to the same puzzle.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Different Sort of Love Story March 18, 2014
Format:Kindle Edition
The Adjacent is my first taste of Priest’s work. I know, I know how could I call myself a serious genre reader and yet never cracked the pages of a Priest novel? I’ve always been aware of him as an author – when I was in my teens I knew that Priest had written two Doctor Who scripts for the 4th Doctor that were never made, and, of course, I’ve seen Christopher Nolan’s The Prestige – but I’ve never felt compelled to read his work. His novels, nearly a complete collection, sit on my shelves in the garage collecting dust. (Priest is not alone. My garage has become a Sargasso Sea of novels and novelists whose books I own but whose work I’ve never read).

When The Adjacent was announced I decided to rectify that state affairs… and then nearly didn’t when I read the closing paragraph to Niall Alexander’s positive review of the book on Strange Horizons:

"Reading The Adjacent is like taking a grand tour of the larger canon Christopher Priest has established over the course of his forty-year career, so no, newcomers need not apply, but old hands are apt to find it massively satisfying."

Newcomers need not apply…

Now that I’ve finished the novel I can appreciate where Niall is coming from. Even with my limited knowledge of Priest’s oeuvre, there’s a feeling that this book is a continuation of a bar conversation that Priest has begun elsewhere. Not in specific plot details, but in the recycling of elements that Priest has always been fascinated with – magicians, aeroplanes, H.G Wells, and archipelagos that exist somewhere to the left of our reality.

I’m sure if you’re aware of all the bits and pieces that reflect and echo previous novels you’ll have more fun with The Adjacent. That’s certainly the impression I get from Niall’s review.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars poor characters May 7, 2014
By beluga
Format:Kindle Edition
I agree with some of what the other reviewers conclude here. But truly, this book reveals so little of the convoluted plot gaps by the last page, that I wish i hadn't started it. Some here report that they were challenged by several unconnected story lines, and therefore conclude that this plot is a terrific puzzle waiting for the reader to solve. Actually, it reminds me of a jigsaw puzzle with enough pieces missing that you can't quite see what it is supposed to be.

Was I the only reader with any real interest in learning if the ostensibly dead wife (described as dead in over half the book) actually died? Or how on Earth does both she and her husband suddenly turn up together 100 years in the past without any explanation. Or, for what reason do all the male characters have the same basic facial looks and also share TT as initials? The chronology given to me by the author makes it clear they can't all be incarnations of one other. So what else could be going on? I never discovered it.

I could mention six or seven other plot devices that just dribble away without ever getting resolved. Honestly, If a book founded on wholly unresolved plot lines gets praised here as a stack of skillful devices by a "master of Illusion", then I'm not interested. At the end, I felt the author was giving me the finger, letting me know that, yes, things are disconnected and unresolved, but offering me no how or why or when.

I could only shake my head as the author led me into meeting the several female characters. Almost every one is described as being aloof, self absorbed, cold, officious, or some such. But then each woman spends no more than ten minutes alone with one of our shuffling TT heroes, and suddenly they are throwing off their own clothes and pushing TT towards the nearest bed. Cartoon characters, anyone?
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Tough but rewarding reading
This novel requires some deep introspection, but it's time well spent. If you're willing to work a little, you'll appreciate the ambition inherent to the plot.
Published 2 months ago by trevornewland
2.0 out of 5 stars I am not a fan
The basic plot, obscure though it is, has been covered in detail by other reviewers and won't be repeated here. Read more
Published 2 months ago by L. M. Crane
3.0 out of 5 stars An Oddly Compelling, Yet Unsatisfying Love Story
If you're like me and like your narratives to be mostly resolved by the end of the movie/book/story, then you might want to skip this otherwise excellent and intriguing book. Read more
Published 2 months ago by A. Ross
2.0 out of 5 stars Well written but plotless
This book was very well written with vivid descriptions of places and events that I never cared about. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Adam Nordost
3.0 out of 5 stars New to Priest - didn't like it
Three stars for writing style, creativity, and story-telling. This is a near-apocalyptic story in many ways, with a somber tone from the start. Read more
Published 2 months ago by TJ
3.0 out of 5 stars Great idea but poor ending
Priest presents with a good concept, moving back and forth in time and place, with the narrative seeming to lead to a complex resolution but culminating with a sappy love story... Read more
Published 3 months ago by John J. Siller
5.0 out of 5 stars Doubles, Separation and other Priest themes
Classic Christopher Priest Topics - the war, science fiction, HG Wells, multiple worlds, islands - addressed from a new angle. Everything by Priest is worth reading.
Published 12 months ago by Will Phelan
4.0 out of 5 stars Remarkable and intricate
Priest uses metaphors of flight to present a relationship in different eras and different societies, including his own Dream Archipelago. Read more
Published 13 months ago by Phipedro
5.0 out of 5 stars Dark Ravens, not White Doves, Emerge from the Magician's Hat
Christopher Priest is adept at mangling the mind of an unwary (and even a wary!) reader; all his books tangle, darkly, with our perceptions of reality and identity. Read more
Published 13 months ago by Lady Fancifull
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Look for Similar Items by Category