The Admiral's Daughter: A Kydd Sea Adventure and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $2.84 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Libraria
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: No writing, marks or highlighting. Ships from Amazon.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Admiral's Daughter: A Kydd Sea Adventure (Kydd Sea Adventures) Paperback – October 1, 2008


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.16
$8.99 $6.39
--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


Frequently Bought Together

The Admiral's Daughter: A Kydd Sea Adventure (Kydd Sea Adventures) + Command: A Kydd Sea Adventure (Kydd Sea Adventures) + Tenacious: A Kydd Sea Adventure (Kydd Sea Adventures)
Price for all three: $41.51

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Bone Clocks
David Mitchell's hypnotic new novel crackles with invention and sheer storytelling pleasure. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Kydd Sea Adventures (Book 8)
  • Paperback: 324 pages
  • Publisher: McBooks Press (October 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590131649
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590131640
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 5.1 x 7.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #471,820 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for Julian Stockwin -- - 'Another thundering good read for those who love seagoing stories in the Hornblower mould' -- Peterborough Evening Telegraph 'I was soon turning the pages almost indecently fast ... Roll on, the promised adventures of Kydd and Renzi.' -- Independent on KYDD 'Stockwin paints a vivid picture of life aboard the mighty ship-of-the-line... the harsh naval discipline, the rancid food, and the skill of the common sailor are all skilfully evoked.' -- Daily Express on KYDD 'The appeal of the story is in the telling, which is atmospheric, authentic ... The author had a long career in the Royal Navy, which adds to his prose that extra dash of salty realism.' -- Publishing News on MUTINY 'In Stockwin's hands the sea story will continue to entrance readers across the world.' -- Guardian on KYDD --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From the Author

This is the first book in the Kydd series set in Home Waters. Ironically, I've found this as wild and exotic a location as any, with spectacle ranging from the iron-bound coast to the incredible complex of the Plymouth naval base and dockyard. Certainly in those pre-factory times it was the wonder of the age, employing so many thousands of men.

No-one in England lives far from the sea and a strong and abiding relationship with Neptune's realm is a national characteristic, but it is perhaps in the West Country, where I set this book , that the maritime heritage is strongest. Since time immemorial, the sea has provided food and transport links between isolated communities, and with hundreds of miles of rocky coastline and winter storms equal to any, it has also been the graveyard of so many ships.

This book was great fun to write, but it also presented some new challenges to me as a writer. I hope you enjoy it! --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


More About the Author

I wanted to go to sea ever since I can remember. My mother says that as a toddler I went up to sailors on the street, and on one occasion dragged home a dead seabird because it smelled of the sea! I was entranced when my great uncle Tom Clay, a seaman in square-rigged ships who had sailed around the Horn in the "Cutty Sark", took me over this ship. As a young boy I read everything about the sea and I was especially terrified by a description of a great storm, but longed to go to sea to experience one.
I won a scholarship to a grammar school, but my mind was captivated by seeing low grey shapes far out to sea, outward bound to who knew where. I passed this sight every day on my way to school; my scholastic performance suffered!
In the hope of having the nonsense knocked out of me, my father sent me to a tough sea-training school. This only strengthened my resolve for a life at sea and at fifteen I joined the Royal Navy.
After leaving the Navy (rated Petty Officer) I practised as an educational psychologist. I worked for some time in Hong Kong, where I was commissioned into the Royal Naval Reserve.
I now live in Devon with my wife and literary partner, Kathy - and two Siamese cats.

Customer Reviews

I can't wait to see how this one ends and to start the next one.
Gringo
Well, in the arena of language, Stockwin writes as the characters would speak, complete with slang, jargon, and dialect.
Dr J
That is counterbalanced by the fact that it sometimes seems to be a novel in search of a plot.
Fred Camfield

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Sophist on October 16, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
While reading this work, I was struck by what must have been a Herculean research effort. The myriad details of the English coast, and the look into the vast differences between social classes was excellent. However, the fact that I noted the quality of the underlying research effort while I was reading the story says something about the quality of this reading experience. When I read Kydd, I expect to be transported back into that time. Supporting details are important, but they should not impinge on the overall story line and the quality of the reading experience. The balance between the supporting details and the ability of the story line to dominate your attention seemed to be a bit off in this effort.

I got the impression that the author hurried the last twenty percent of the final story. This might explain my dissatisfaction with how the story concludes. The entire book seemed to be setting up a battle royal with the primary protagonist, but instead ended up with a particularly non satisfying, and I must say unrealistic ending to that particular aspect of the story line. For example, its understandable that Kydd's men were not carrying fire arms, but their protagonists?? The highly competent enemy basically falls on Kydd's sword??

Kydd's complete lack of social sensibilities ends up causing considerable harm to his and his Admirals social position. This quite rightly earns Kydd his first true enemy, an Admiral no less. Yet when Kydd suffers the grounding of his ship, and then is not present for several days to take care of final repairs, the Admiral responds by removing Kydd's privilege to sleep off his ship?? This before Kydd has any victories...
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By H. Green on November 13, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This latest Kydd novel was a real disappointment. The plot consists of many short (1-2 page) subplots comprising Kydd's lengthy, immature romantic adventures, with almost no naval action. Here's an officer who "growls" at his men and officers, pining like a moonstruck child over his possible entry into high society. Worse, Stockwin's "Maturin" clone, Renzi, has become, in this novel and the preceeding Australian adventure, a genuine nutcase. An interesting character in the earlier novels has evolved (or perhaps degenerated is a better word) into an entirely uninteresting piece of baggage. My reading of the series may end with this book - I'll have to read the reviews on his next 5-6 novels before I purchase another. I just don't know (or like) where this series is going.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By JRR on December 31, 2007
Format: Hardcover
THE KIDD SERIES HAS BEEN PROMISING IN TRACING THE PROGRESS OF A PRESSED MAN FROM FO'CASTLE TO QUARTERDECK, AND HIS CHALLENGES IN LEARNING HIS NAVAL TRADE WHILE ALSO ENCOUNTERING A HARDENED UNFORGIVING CLASS SYSTEM. IN ADMIRAL'S DAUGHTER, THE AUTHOR LOSES TOUCH WITH HIS HERO, LOSSES TOUCH WITH THE IMPORTANCE OF THE SEA STORIES TO THE READERS OF THIS SERIES, AND PROVES HIMSELF INEPT AND UNCONVINCING INEPT IN WRITING ABOUT WOMEN. HIS AFTERFORWARD LEADS ME TO BELIEVE THAT SUCCESS MADE HIM LAZY AND SELF-INDULGENT. THIS IS REALLY A DREADFUL BOOK.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Donald P. Hayes on January 14, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book disappointed me because the author has the main character take an action which is completely outside of the personality of the intelligent and ambitious man so far portrayed. Also, that action was unthinkable and socially unrecoverable for a gentleman of the early 19th Century. Sadly, the book was demonstrating that navagating the waters of society at that time was as difficult and complicated as commanding a sailing vessel. This was ruined by the sudden and unrealistic turn of events. I hope the author does not repeat this mistake in his next volume.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Fred Camfield on November 24, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Readers looking for a naval adventure may be disappointed. The novel seems to be more about time ashore and romantic entanglements. Captain Frederick Hoffman's "A Sailor of King George" has discussions about an officer's tendency to spend time on excursions ashore.

The time is 1803, and the fleet has been mobilized. Details of the time period and actual events will be found in "The War for all the Oceans" by Roy Adkins and Lesley Adkins. Commander Kydd is back in command of a sloop, but finds himself chasing privateers and smugglers along the English coastline between Lands End and Plymouth. Most of the activity at sea is against the elements, and you learn a lot about the coast of Cornwall. There is some activity against smugglers, similar to the details found in C. Northcote Parkinson's "Devil to Pay," and a little action against a privateer. That is interspersed with Kydd's social and remantic entanglements and his relationships with his sister and with his friend Renzi.

The novel has some well researched details about sailing in bad weather, the hazards of the coast of Cornwall, life in fishing villages, and the English class structure. That is counterbalanced by the fact that it sometimes seems to be a novel in search of a plot. The main character, Kydd, has some triumphs and tragedy, but it can be hard to find a central focus unless you are interested in his love live.

In cases where naval action occurs, it seems a little brief, almost like an afterthought.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?