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The Adventures of Johnny Bunko: The Last Career Guide You'll Ever Need Paperback – April 1, 2008

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Any career consultant -- or high-school guidance counselor -- who doesn't immediately order copies of this book in bulk is missing the boat -- big time." -- Miami Herald

"Hard-hitting and informative yet bursting with optimism . . . Pink has a knack for teaching in such an entertaining way that you'll forget you are learning." -- Forbes

"Outrageous, delightful ... If the precepts in 'The Adventures of Johnny Bunko' help some slackers open nail salons or become billionaires in some offbeat business, that's all to the good" -- Wall Street Journal

"The ideal gift for those in need of a career shakeup who claim they have no time to even think about next steps." -- NYTimes.com

About the Author

Daniel H. Pink is the author of five books, including To Sell Is Human and the long-running New York Times bestsellers A Whole New Mind and Drive. His books have been translated into thirty-three languages and have sold more than a million copies in the United States alone. Pink lives with his family in Washington, D.C.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Riverhead Books (April 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594482918
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594482915
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.4 x 7.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (171 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,731 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

136 of 146 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 1, 2008
Format: Paperback
Young people mostly get their career advice from friends (who usually don't have any more experience or knowledge than they do) and family (who base their ideas on what worked three decades ago). Either way, you get off track pretty easily.

There's plenty of good career advice in books and articles, but most young people wouldn't sit still long enough to read those sources. A Whole New Mind author, Dan Pink, comes up with a great solution: Create a career advice book in the form of manga.

Most career writers when they want to simplify a message use a fable, with a few illustrations that show the key perspectives. The fable is clearly secondary to the details.

In The Adventures of Johnny Bunko, the story is more interesting than the advice. Having read a lot of Mr. Pink's writing, I thought I knew what he would probably advise. But I didn't realize that he would make the story so interesting, and that the manga format would add so much power to the story telling. Nice work!

What's the advice? Let me rephrase to make it clearer to you:

1. Don't be rigid about planning out each step well in advance . . . it's not possible to do.

2. Build on what you're good at (Peter Drucker originated that one) and avoid relying on what you aren't good at.

3. Focus on what you can do for others (start with the boss) rather than what's in it for you (you can read more about this in How to Be a Star at Work).

4. Keep at it. Practice makes perfect.

5. Take on big challenges and learn from them.

6. Make a difference.

I like this advice. I hope my youngsters will read this book and apply it. I know they probably wouldn't if it came from dear old Dad.

If I could add one piece of advice, it would be to:

Set some written goals about how you want to spend your life. Those goals will help you keep focused.

Well done, Dan Pink and Rob Ten Pas!
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Larry R on September 27, 2009
Format: Paperback
Being quite the fan of Daniel Pink, I was excited to see that a new work of his had appeared. The book is a quick and easy read, the illustrations are fun, and it definitely contains a number of important career gems. HOWEVER, it falls far short of being "The last career guide you'll ever need". The book explores *what* to do, but says nothing about *how* to do it, which is just as important. Perhaps that would be more difficult to communicate in a short manga work.

All in all, this is probably worthwhile. Calibrate your expections appropriately, and you won't be disappointed. But don't expect to read this and have all your career problems melt away - there is a LOT that needs to be covered that isn't touched on here.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Sean M. Goodman on August 5, 2008
Format: Paperback
Having read all of Daniel Pink's other books, I was excited to see this on the shelf. I started with Free Agent Nation a few years ago, which gave me a totally new perspective on the whole concept of work in the 21st century. I then worked my way into A Whole New Mind, which gave me--a mostly right-brained technology worker--hope for the future in a previously left-brain dominated world. It's neat to see not only the world itself shifting from left-brain to right-brain, but also to see this author's presentation jump into an obviously quirky/fun style. I loved the other books, but then again I love to read. I was a little concerned about the Manga style at first, but I didn't pick it up because of the style or the graphics: Mr. Pink's books are all extremely thought-provoking, and have pointed me in the right direction many times (not just job searches and career moves). So, yes, I bought the book simply because of the author's name on the side, but when I flipped through it in the bookstore, I realized it had a lot of substance. Like any good parable, it's an entertaining story about a fictional character who is just like a lot of us at work. I love the fact that the author's eating his own dog food here, by presenting this book in a fun way that draws you in (he talks about content -> design -> story in his previous book). I read this book once all the way through too fast...and then went back and re-read it when I had more time, and picked up a lot of things I had missed the first time around. It resonated so much with me that I let my girlfriend read it (she loved it) and I'm thinking of loaning it to other friends who seem bored with their jobs/lives. I've been reading a lot of books lately that have given me back far more than I've put into them monetarily.Read more ›
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Fez Monkey on September 3, 2008
Format: Paperback
I gave the book to a 22 year old and he sat down and immediately READ the whole thing. The graphic novel format is genius. Heck, I am well past my 20's and I enjoyed it. I am a big fan of Daniel Pink and especially Whole New Mind. If you can't get a college age or younger to read Whole New Mind this book just might lure them into it. Great information presented in a way that appeals to the audience who most needs it. A great gift to give!! I will be buying more copies to give.
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25 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Open Your Eyes on November 6, 2008
Format: Paperback
My point of view is dissenting compared to many reviews. So I will start by saying that the 6 defining ideas of the book truly are of great value. They include:
1- "There is no plan."
2- "Think strengths, not weaknesses."
3- "It's not about you."
4- "Persistence trumps talent."
5- "Make excellent mistakes."
6- "Leave an imprint."

All ideas have merit, although not perfect when actually applied.

The problem with the book is the same I have with Pink's video (and book) "A Whole New Mind." Within the first few minutes of the video, Pink is telling the audience that parents and educators are doing whatever they can to destroy the life of their children and students by giving terminal career advice. The same attitude is prevalent in "Johnny Bunko." Pink's Bob Dylan approach of "don't trust anyone over 30" is weak and insulting. This is the delivery I am referring to as being divisive. Note in the book how the 50 something manager is rude, closed-minded, lacks insight and is more of a constraint to the staff than anything else. This is not like any baby boomer I have ever met (I am a Gen-Xer by the way).

Clearly, Pink's attempt at proclaiming himself a rock star stands in the way of his valuable ideas. And this is unfortunate because principle one has been an important one in my life and I believe in it. In fact I believe in all of them although the career counselor that made the comments about some careers requiring carefully planning, makes an excellent point too.

My advice to Pink is the he consider how he insults those older than Gen Y, as he presents his ideas. Also, teachers really are not bad people and do not have an agenda of wrecking the lives of young students (nice try).
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