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123 of 133 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Get Beyond the Bad Advice that Family and Friends Give
Young people mostly get their career advice from friends (who usually don't have any more experience or knowledge than they do) and family (who base their ideas on what worked three decades ago). Either way, you get off track pretty easily.

There's plenty of good career advice in books and articles, but most young people wouldn't sit still long enough to read...
Published on April 1, 2008 by Donald Mitchell

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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good for what is it, but less than it claims to be
Being quite the fan of Daniel Pink, I was excited to see that a new work of his had appeared. The book is a quick and easy read, the illustrations are fun, and it definitely contains a number of important career gems. HOWEVER, it falls far short of being "The last career guide you'll ever need". The book explores *what* to do, but says nothing about *how* to do it, which...
Published on September 27, 2009 by Larry R


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123 of 133 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Get Beyond the Bad Advice that Family and Friends Give, April 1, 2008
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Adventures of Johnny Bunko: The Last Career Guide You'll Ever Need (Paperback)
Young people mostly get their career advice from friends (who usually don't have any more experience or knowledge than they do) and family (who base their ideas on what worked three decades ago). Either way, you get off track pretty easily.

There's plenty of good career advice in books and articles, but most young people wouldn't sit still long enough to read those sources. A Whole New Mind author, Dan Pink, comes up with a great solution: Create a career advice book in the form of manga.

Most career writers when they want to simplify a message use a fable, with a few illustrations that show the key perspectives. The fable is clearly secondary to the details.

In The Adventures of Johnny Bunko, the story is more interesting than the advice. Having read a lot of Mr. Pink's writing, I thought I knew what he would probably advise. But I didn't realize that he would make the story so interesting, and that the manga format would add so much power to the story telling. Nice work!

What's the advice? Let me rephrase to make it clearer to you:

1. Don't be rigid about planning out each step well in advance . . . it's not possible to do.

2. Build on what you're good at (Peter Drucker originated that one) and avoid relying on what you aren't good at.

3. Focus on what you can do for others (start with the boss) rather than what's in it for you (you can read more about this in How to Be a Star at Work).

4. Keep at it. Practice makes perfect.

5. Take on big challenges and learn from them.

6. Make a difference.

I like this advice. I hope my youngsters will read this book and apply it. I know they probably wouldn't if it came from dear old Dad.

If I could add one piece of advice, it would be to:

Set some written goals about how you want to spend your life. Those goals will help you keep focused.

Well done, Dan Pink and Rob Ten Pas!
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good for what is it, but less than it claims to be, September 27, 2009
By 
Larry R (Cape Cod, MA, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Adventures of Johnny Bunko: The Last Career Guide You'll Ever Need (Paperback)
Being quite the fan of Daniel Pink, I was excited to see that a new work of his had appeared. The book is a quick and easy read, the illustrations are fun, and it definitely contains a number of important career gems. HOWEVER, it falls far short of being "The last career guide you'll ever need". The book explores *what* to do, but says nothing about *how* to do it, which is just as important. Perhaps that would be more difficult to communicate in a short manga work.

All in all, this is probably worthwhile. Calibrate your expections appropriately, and you won't be disappointed. But don't expect to read this and have all your career problems melt away - there is a LOT that needs to be covered that isn't touched on here.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't let the presentation fool you...content rich., August 5, 2008
This review is from: The Adventures of Johnny Bunko: The Last Career Guide You'll Ever Need (Paperback)
Having read all of Daniel Pink's other books, I was excited to see this on the shelf. I started with Free Agent Nation a few years ago, which gave me a totally new perspective on the whole concept of work in the 21st century. I then worked my way into A Whole New Mind, which gave me--a mostly right-brained technology worker--hope for the future in a previously left-brain dominated world. It's neat to see not only the world itself shifting from left-brain to right-brain, but also to see this author's presentation jump into an obviously quirky/fun style. I loved the other books, but then again I love to read. I was a little concerned about the Manga style at first, but I didn't pick it up because of the style or the graphics: Mr. Pink's books are all extremely thought-provoking, and have pointed me in the right direction many times (not just job searches and career moves). So, yes, I bought the book simply because of the author's name on the side, but when I flipped through it in the bookstore, I realized it had a lot of substance. Like any good parable, it's an entertaining story about a fictional character who is just like a lot of us at work. I love the fact that the author's eating his own dog food here, by presenting this book in a fun way that draws you in (he talks about content -> design -> story in his previous book). I read this book once all the way through too fast...and then went back and re-read it when I had more time, and picked up a lot of things I had missed the first time around. It resonated so much with me that I let my girlfriend read it (she loved it) and I'm thinking of loaning it to other friends who seem bored with their jobs/lives. I've been reading a lot of books lately that have given me back far more than I've put into them monetarily. My only concern is that people might overlook or dismiss this useful book simply because of the Manga presentation. Once you start reading, the characters come to life (especially Johnny, for anyone who's done the same job over and over again without really finding joy in it), and you start to see ways of improving your own situation. If you enjoy reading this book (I know I sound like Amazon or whatever making recommendations), go back and take a look at Free Agent Nation (although it is a few years old, it has good advice and entertaining stories) and A Whole New Mind (more recent, and pulls the author's thoughts together into a more detail-rich and current book than the first). This book certainly stands alone, but you might enjoy rounding this parable out with the full-scale novels of his other two books. To summarize: unless you're totally, 100% happy with your current job or life situation, you should read Johnny Bunko to see if there aren't a few things you might be missing. Warning: side effects may include increased cravings for Asian food eaten with chopsticks!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Career Advice for a 20-something, September 3, 2008
This review is from: The Adventures of Johnny Bunko: The Last Career Guide You'll Ever Need (Paperback)
I gave the book to a 22 year old and he sat down and immediately READ the whole thing. The graphic novel format is genius. Heck, I am well past my 20's and I enjoyed it. I am a big fan of Daniel Pink and especially Whole New Mind. If you can't get a college age or younger to read Whole New Mind this book just might lure them into it. Great information presented in a way that appeals to the audience who most needs it. A great gift to give!! I will be buying more copies to give.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the best career guides ever, September 29, 2008
By 
This review is from: The Adventures of Johnny Bunko: The Last Career Guide You'll Ever Need (Paperback)
This animated career guide has some of the best advice I've ever read in such a condensed, easy to read format. The story line shares six important rules that can not only be applied to one's career, but to one's entire life. The only reason it loses a star is because it's too short; definitely a one-sit read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Johnny Bunko Reviewed, June 30, 2008
This review is from: The Adventures of Johnny Bunko: The Last Career Guide You'll Ever Need (Paperback)
The Adventures of Johnny Bunko: The Last Career Guide You'll Ever Need by Daniel Pink, art by Rob Ten Pas, Penguin Books, 2008

I wasn't looking for a career guide and I didn't expect to buy a manga-style comic book about business but, since The Adventures of Johnny Bunko is by Daniel Pink, I grabbed it right away. Pink is the author of A Whole New Mind which highlights the ever-increasing importance of right-brain thinking for the success of today's workers. In Johnny Bunko, Pink uses right-brain elements like design, story, emotion, and metaphor to talk about six lessons for career success. After a lucky "break," character Johnny Bunko combines the teachings of a flighty guru with his own experiences to learn the six lessons:
There is no plan.
Think strengths, not weaknesses.
It's not about you.
Persistence trumps talent.
Make excellent mistakes.
Leave an imprint.
What's appealing about these lessons, besides their simplicity, is their applicability to more than just one's career aspirations. Personal relationships, family life, and community participation can all benefit from focusing on people's strengths or a desire to leave a positive imprint, for example.

And the book is appealing too. The manga illustrations evoke both mood and motion - qualities absent from the business publishing world. The book becomes accessible to anyone and invites a quick re-read whenever there is a spare moment. Not a bad quality considering it could take a whole career to master these six lessons! For that reason alone, it's this year's graduation present for everyone on my list.

For more information: [...]
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The use of Anime as a platform for wisdom..., June 9, 2008
This review is from: The Adventures of Johnny Bunko: The Last Career Guide You'll Ever Need (Paperback)
I'll keep my review short, since this is a short book. I was scared that I was not getting value for my money but boy was I wrong. The books is comprised of six career principles and some other pearls of wisdom but the use of anime, allows the examples to be so clear and concise that it is not necessary to include anymore details and so at the end, I did not feel cheated. The book is really designed like a manga. It is good that the writer didn't keep the dialogue childish and the artist was able to convey a wide range of emotions. The story is a universal one in that, anyone can relate. It deals with destiny, failure, selflessness, perseverance and leaving a legacy. I wholeheartedly recommend it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent guide for recent (or soon-to-be) college grads, June 8, 2008
By 
Terrence H. Seamon (New Brunswick, New Jersey USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Adventures of Johnny Bunko: The Last Career Guide You'll Ever Need (Paperback)
Looking for a book to give your child who is about to graduate college and enter the workforce? Look no further. Johnny Bunko, written in the manga style of Japanese comics, is the answer. Author Dan (A Whole New Mind) Pink provides six life lessons, packaged in a humorous and readable comic strip book, perfectly executed for the Gen Y reader.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Career Counseling has never been this much fun., February 3, 2009
This review is from: The Adventures of Johnny Bunko: The Last Career Guide You'll Ever Need (Paperback)
After you have read so many non-fiction books, you begin to wonder if all non-fiction books are just something you skim through them to see if there might be ANYTHING new that is worthy of your time to learn. Well, this book is not that one. It is in fact something that you HAVE to take your time to read because it is basically a graphic novel that tells a story we ALL need to hear.

It may only take you an hour to read all the way through this little book but when you are done you will want to think deep about it's "six most important lesson of a satisfying successful career." Now if you are a fan of Billy Crystal and have seen his 1991 movie City Slickers, you may wonder why this book has six things you need to know to be successful where Jack Palance said there is only "one thing." But that is for another article.

The entire book is a manga graphic novel so if you aren't a fan of manga, which I'm not, then it may take you a little while to get into it; but it's worth it. I won't spoil the story line but the essence of the lessons simple enough to be explained in a graphic novel yet profound enough to cause you to change your life's direction; really. Telling you the six lessons would be very easy to do but since it is the main point of the story line, it would be like telling you the plot of City Slickers including what the "one thing" was. (What WAS that "one thing" anyway?)

I would highly recommend this book for a nice quick read but one that will shake your previous conceptions of what it takes to be successful. Read it at your own risk.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Got 30 minutes? Read this book..., August 15, 2008
This review is from: The Adventures of Johnny Bunko: The Last Career Guide You'll Ever Need (Paperback)
"The Karate Kid" meets "Office Space" through the popular Japanese medium "Manga" in this totally enjoyable read. Meet Johnny, toiling slavishly in an unrewarding and uninspiring dead-end job, thinking he's "paying his dues," and "getting his ticket punched." Enter Diana, 3-foot-nothing hard hitting tough love career counseling pixie (think spawn of Mr. Miyagi and Tinkerbell), to show Johnny the ropes and get him moving in a good orderly direction. Fun stuff.

Do I think Mssrs. Pink and Pas have encapsulated the meaning of life into a 125-page comic book? Not necessarily; unlike "7 Habits" or "What Color is Your Parachute," however, this is a career guide that the recent/impending 18-24 year old high school/college graduate in your life might actually a) read all the way through, and 2) spend the remainder of the hour thinking about. That in itself is no mean feat given the distractions confronting today's youth.

Now, if I were even fractionally as gifted and talented as the authors, and chose to write a career guide, I might not necessarily espouse precisely the same recipe, but that's OK; if all this book does is get read by the intended audience, and spark debate on the topic, that in itself constitutes successful literature, in my opinion.

Go ahead, get the book, read it, and pass it on (along with some chopsticks); I sincerely doubt you will regret it. 10 bucks well spent.

Enjoy!
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The Adventures of Johnny Bunko: The Last Career Guide You'll Ever Need
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