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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon January 25, 2003
Two of the three adventures here have their genesis in earlier Tintin adventures. Red Sea Sharks takes Capt Haddock back to a ship, and this time we see his metamorphosis from the drunkard in Tintin and the Golden Crab to a responsible and almost noble person who tries his best (in his inimitable manner) to prevent Africans from being sold in slavery. 'Tintin in Tibet' sees Tintin off to Tibet (obviously), with a short stop in Delhi, to rescue his friend who he first met in 'The Blue Lotus'. We meet the yeti, see the captain's attempts at whistling, Snowy's bravery (unintended, as in The Black Island).
I read these adventures as a kid, and some twenty years later I still find myself enjoying these as much. I also enjoy HTML and CSS books now, but some things are too good to grow out of :)
A word of warning - try and buy the bigger versions of these adventures. The 3-in-1 format is convenient to be sure, but the big print of the indivudal comics is that much more satisfying!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on October 13, 2002
For reasons unknown, at almost 43 years old, I suddenly had this strange desire to read some of the Tintin stories I read when I was about 12. As a kid I spent countless hours reading Herge's books over and over. If memory serves, I only had 5 or 6 titles, and they were big books with hard covers.
This book is a great value since it contains 3 stories. Oh what memories they bring back. If you ever read Tintin as a kid, get some of these books. The only caveat is that the text is hard to read as these collections are smaller in size and both the drawings and text have been shrunk proportionately.
And yet another "warning." You may start buying the bigger individual stories once you read one of these. I should know. I am now hooked again and "collecting" all 23 volumes.
Thank you, Herge. We miss you.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on July 15, 2007
I've always been a Tintin fan, and wanted to buy a book for my son. However the format of this book was disappointing, as the original (single) story books were more like A4. The book (with three stories in one) is just too small. It's not the fact that there are three stories all in one volume, it's simply the size of the book. Why was it changed? If you're thinking of buying one of these ... check the measurements! The're not the same size as the originals.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on September 9, 2006
My highest recommendation goes to this volume.

Volume 6: The Calculus Affair (1956), The Red Sea Sharks (1958), Tintin in Tibet (1960). This is the sixth instalment of my reviews of each of the seven volumes.

Oh, what a trifecta in this volume! Tintin is not so well-known in the USA and the American who might give it a try would do well with this volume. The artwork has become draftsman-like, the lines are clean and brisk, the composition of the panels is endlessly pleasing, and the pace of each adventure always just right. The bottom right panel is the teaser panel, inciting us to turn the page and read on. Bear in mind that before being in book form, these adventures came out two pages at a time in Tintin magazine, with the teaser keeping us in suspense until the following week's edition.

"The Calculus Affair" was, for a child, a dauntingly adult-sounding title, and the story a little less accessible than the others. But what a cold war story! - with a plausible scientific gizmo, kidnappings, car chases, an Eastern bloc-style military junta set in fictional Borduria with an iconography based on the régime's founder (just look at the cars' bumpers), and with Tintin's determined aplomb and Haddock's ever-entertaining slapstick, riding a crackling plot from beginning to end. Castafiore earns an added dimension for her character and the insufferable Jolyon Wagg takes his first bows. Regarded by many as the best of the series.

The cover of The Red Sea Sharks shows the heroes marooned on a raft in the eponymous setting, seen through a telescope. What brought them there and what lies next is an adventure that involves depth charges, jet attacks, torpedoes, a burning ship, clandestine commerce handled by a villain we've seen before. The French title (Coke en Stock) gives a clue as to what this commerce is, but I won't give it away. A great adventure with a tremendous amount of action and some hilarious moments, showing Hergé's mastery of the visual narrative, but the author's own favourite comes next...

Tintin in Tibet. Hergé's personal favourite; the cover shows the explorers confronted with huge humanoid footprints in the Himalayan snows. The teaser is already set for an adventure that shows the deep bond between friends, the loneliness of conviction against all odds, a surreal dream sequence, misunderstanding, Eastern mysticism, and intense solitude. In my review for Volume 4, I said that the Temple of the Sun was a pinnacle in the Tintin series, but this may be THE pinnacle of the whole series. The settings and drawings are positively stunning. I also mentioned elsewhere that Haddock took some of the limelight off Snowy, but in this story, after character parallels are drawn between the two, with some tension, a panel of surpassing sensitivity shows the Captain's deep affection for the dog, after Snowy himself showed the extent of his own devotion to Tintin. Humour is superbly developed, in one notable case around a theme of making faces as a greeting and, of course, the irascible Haddock's misinterpretation of this. The final, poignant panel strikes a chord of empathy in anyone with feeling. This is a story to read to your children: the richness, the interconnectedness, and the humanity of the whole are a stimulus to any child's experience.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on July 10, 2011
This is not a review of the content - Tin Tin will always have a special place in my life for helping to inspire an avid interest in other cultures and world travel. I bought this book to hope to do the same with my son.

The book's presentation is awful. The book is nearly half the size of the original (a 46% reduction to be precise). The images are small and the text is tiny. Reading it together is a trying experience - even with my son sitting on my lap, to position the book where we can both see it and still be able to read the dialogue is next to impossible.

Others have had similar complaints, though I unfortunately did not read them before purchase. I'll not be buying another book in this series. My next purchase will either be the originals from eBay or something in a digital format.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I grew up with Tintin books, and my kids are now at an age where they are beyond "See Spot Run" but don't always have the patience for a full-length book. The stories are always great, and the research is meticulous. Most of the story subjects were highly topical at the time, and reading the books regularly provide history refresher.

"The Calculus Affair" is a typical cold-war cloak-and-dagger story of espionage and intrigue. How the world has changed, but the Litvinenko Affair is a reminder that the Cold War was a reality not so long ago.

"The Red Sea Sharks" deals with gun-running and slavery in the Middle East, a subject that is still topical (as the UN's efforts attest).

"Tintin in Tibet" is one of my favourites, a great Tintin story used by Herge to draw attention to Red China's invasion and annexation of Tibet, and the cultural heritage the Communists set about to destroy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 18, 2007
I grew up reading The Adventures of Tintin and recently purchased this volume for a young cousin in an effort to turn him on to these great stories. I like the new hard cover 3 story format as my old paperback copies have begun to come apart, from repeated reading of course. One thing that I noticed is that unlike the original versions which each had exactly 62 pages, the new format has not preserved this... now I know that's a little nerotic but that's something I always remembered from reading them as a young boy, the fact that each was exactly 62 pages. Herge is a very talented artist and story teller, I would recommend the complete collection to anyone who is looking for a quality adventure story!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 8, 2011
My wife became a life-long Tintin fan 30-odd years ago when my son was growing up. When I saw this 3 for 1 book advertised, I thought it would make a nice Christmas gift for her. As others have stated, the print and pictures are much too small to enjoy compared to the originals. Granted, Amazon specifies the book size, but who checks that? I just mailed it back for a refund.
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on May 18, 2013
Tintin is one of the finest comic series that I ever had the pleasure of reading as a boy, and not long ago, a seven-volume set was published, collecting the best and most memorable works about Tintin, though a few were left out (either because of overall poor quality art and controversy, such as the first two Tintin books,) or the last books, due to not being published in the lifetime of their author, and most likely not being entirely written by him either. If you've got the books in this collection, you've got the cream of the crop, and the best that Tintin has to offer.

The collection is hardcover, and faithfully reprints the various Tintin works in their original, full-color form, although the book itself is smaller that the original printings, meaning that at times, the text is a bit difficult to read, due to the reduction in size that everything took in the transition. It would, I think, be very hard for children to enjoy this collection, but as a budget choice for adults who want to re-experience their favorite childhood stories, it's good option overall.

Volume 6 contains three stories, and unfortunately, they're not the best of the lot, though none is horrible. The first; "the Calculus Affair," is easily the best. Professor Calculus is abducted by international agents after he makes a few breakthroughs in the use of sound as a weapon, and Tintin, Captain Haddock and Snowy go off in pursuit. Adventures and hijinks ensue, and a good time is had by all.

The second story; the Red Sea Sharks, is probably the worst story in the volume, for a couple of reasons. First is its treatment of the black passengers on the freighter "the Ramona." They speak very limited English, and sound very much like the Indians from Peter Pan, or like Bizarro Superman in terms of the way they talk. I suspect that this is just because Herge himself (or the translators, perhaps,) didn't know how real people would talk if they had a limited knowledge of the language that Tintin speaks (French in the original publications,) but it does come off as kind of corny. Because of this, they also fail to understand the Captain's initial warnings to them, and seem a bit dim, as a result. Still, this part could have been a great deal worse, since they -do- try to defend themselves when they feel they're being attacked, and one of them saves Captain Haddock from the knife of a slave-trader. Tintin, in turn, saves many of them from being sold as slaves, and eventually exposes the slavery ring responsible for the travesty. It's a bit uncomfortable to read, but not nearly as bad as it could be.

The second problem with this story is all the guest-stars from previous books. Alcazar, Abdullah, Castafiore, Allan, etc, etc... There's a point at which the fun of seeing a familiar face becomes more of a sales hook for the previous books than an integral part of the story. Allan's role in particular was unnecessary, and could have been played by any generic sea captain in the region. Too often, in this one, I just didn't feel that the guest stars added anything to the story.

The final story really only had one problem, that I can see; its continual reliance on dreams/visions to drive the plot. Tintin is alerted to the fact that his friend is alive, and in danger by a dream, and later on, a Tibetan monk experiences multiple visions that assist Tintin in his quest, complete with spontaneous levitation and everything. It got annoying to me.

In every other respect, the third story is positively magnificent; another tale of Tintin repeatedly putting his life on the line to save his friend, and really, isn't that where all the best stories come from? Tintin's friend Chang is a Chinese boy who crash-lands in a plane, and everyone is sure he's dead; except for Tintin himself, so off we go on more adventures!

Though I enjoyed these stories as a kid, I found myself enjoying them even more as an adult. Tintin's world is a refreshing one, in which American cultural imperialism hasn't yet crushed the individuality of independent national identities, and in which each nation has its own unique style and culture. I find this to be one of the most appealing aspects of the books; their appreciation for international distinctiveness. Though I think that there should only be one -religion- in the world, I find the idea of -cultural- diversity very appealing, and apparently, so did Herge. I just wish that people would realize the grave threat that America and its mass media poses to that cultural diversity on a global scale.
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The Belgian artist Herge's cartoon hero Tintin, a young journalist and adventurer, has been popular in Europe since the 1920's and has a limited fan base in the United States. Volume 6 of the Three in One Adventure series has three of the better stories on offer, featuring Tintin, his faithful dog Snowy, his seafaring friend Captain Haddock, the eccentric and hilariously hard-of-hearing Professor Calculus, and other recurring characters from the series. The artwork and storline are Herge's originals; the dialogue has been translated into British English.

"The Calculus Affair" starts with a curious recurring phenomenon in and around Captain Haddock's ancestral home of Marlinspike: glass objects shatter for no apparent reason. Tintin and the Captain discover that Professor Calculus has been conducting some sort of experiments with sound waves just as Calculus is kidnapped by unidentified secret agents. The trail leads to a fictional Balkan state where Tintin and the Captain will have to elude the secret police to stage a daring rescue.

In "The Red Sea Sharks", Tintin and Captain Haddock stumble onto an arms smuggling ring about the same time an old Arab friend is deposed as emir of the Arabian state of Khemed. Tintin, the Captain, and Snowy survive an assassination attempt aboard a DC-3 and end up on a Dhow in the Red Sea. When their Dhow is sunk by an armed aircraft, they end up on a freighter. When the crew abandons ship in the middle of the night, the three discover the cargo of the frieghter: munitions and black slaves. Unwilling to abandon the now freed blacks, Tintin and Captain Haddock will have to "fight the ship" against an unexpected foe.

"Tintin in Tibet" is surely one of the more exotic of the adventures. When Tintin's Chinese friend Chang goes missing after an air crash in Tibet, Tintin makes a desperate rescue attempt in the high mountains. Accompanied by Captain Haddock, Snowy, and the guide Tharkey, Tintin will brave the mountains, the weather, and even a Yeti in search of his friend.

This Volume and others in the Three in One Collection are very highly recommended to fans of Tintin of all ages. The stories have held up remarkably well.
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