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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent in both French and English!
I read these books when I was a child, and loved them so much I cannot describe it here. They are not for everyone - some children find them confusing and don't get it completely, but the ones that do get it have tremendous affection for the books.

I still have a lot of love for the books as an adult, and now that my daughter is hooked on the adventures of...
Published on July 1, 1999 by BMoore

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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Too small - I have good eyes and difficult to read
I loved reading TinTin about 30 yrs ago, but the book was about 8.5"x11". This book is only 5"x7", and is hard to read. I was very excited about the books, but now I am very disappointed. Don't waste your time buying the small sized books. If I have a hard time reading, then my kids will too. I have good 20/20 eye site, but won't if I read these books. I am...
Published on December 22, 2011 by TradZ


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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent in both French and English!, July 1, 1999
By 
BMoore (San Francisco) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Adventures of Tintin, Vol. 3: The Crab with the Golden Claws / The Shooting Star / The Secret of the Unicorn (3 Volumes in 1) (Hardcover)
I read these books when I was a child, and loved them so much I cannot describe it here. They are not for everyone - some children find them confusing and don't get it completely, but the ones that do get it have tremendous affection for the books.

I still have a lot of love for the books as an adult, and now that my daughter is hooked on the adventures of Tintin and Milou (Tintin and Snowy), I often find myself engrossed in the copies we now have for her.

Also - The original French editions are great for teaching a child French, as long as you have the English version nearby to compare.

Excellent choice. . .
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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Watch out - Small Size, June 20, 2003
By 
Giant Panda (Washington, DC) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Adventures of Tintin, Vol. 3: The Crab with the Golden Claws / The Shooting Star / The Secret of the Unicorn (3 Volumes in 1) (Hardcover)
This 3-in-One volume is smaller size than the regular Tintin books, making it harder to read and lessens the enjoyment of the illustrations. I am not sure if a large-size 3-in-one series exists.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tintin and Snowy meets up with Captain Haddock for their next three adventures, September 28, 2005
By 
Amazon Customer (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Adventures of Tintin, Vol. 3: The Crab with the Golden Claws / The Shooting Star / The Secret of the Unicorn (3 Volumes in 1) (Hardcover)
Be forewarned that the final adventure of Tintin collected in Volume 3 of Hergé is the first half of a two-part tale. However, this should not be a problem because by the time you get to Volume 3 of "The Adventures of Tintin" you should be committed to getting all seven books (and probably to tracking down the two earlier Hergé stories of the intrepid young reporter and his faithful canine companion Snowy):

"The Crab with the Golden Claws" has a simple beginning, when Snowy goes scavenging in the rubbish and gets his muzzle stuck in a can of crabmeat, which quickly leads our hero on a new adventure. Tintin is knocked unconscious aboard a mysterious ship and taken out to sea where the bad guys intend to send him to the bottom. Of course, but then he comes across the ship's drunken captain, who introduces himself as Captain Haddock. The rest, as they say is history, because this is the first of many adventures for Tintin and the person who, along with Snowy, becomes his almost constant companion in the years to come. Even though this is the good captain in his rawest form, Hergé knew he was onto something with the emotional, blustering, cursing (in his way) Haddock, while Snowy, he does manage to find some of the biggest bones in his long career. "The Crab with the Golden Claws" takes Tintin and his companions from the perils of the high sea to the burning sands of the desert. Of course, all those cans of crab are not actually filled with crab. This 1941 story is a traditional exotic adventure for the Tintin, filled with slapstick and narrow escapes in equal measure, which might indicate Hergé's desire to forget about what was happening in Europe at that point in history.

In 1942 the continent of Europe was totally embroiled in World War II, which may well explain why Hergé offers up the most fanciful of Tintin's adventures. In fact, nothing else comes as close to "The Shooting Star," which begins with the world about to end because of a collision with a giant comet and ends with Tintin dealing with giant mushrooms. In between there is a race to find a meteorite that contains a new element of great scientific importance (another case of Hergé's remarkable premonitions based on meticulous research no doubt). Tintin is aided and abetted in this adventure by Captain Haddock, who we first met in the previous tale, "The Crab with the Golden Claws." But I must say the supporting character who caught my attention was the seaplane pilot who helps our hero in the throughout the episode and in the thrilling climax. You do not usually see such as a realistic, levelheaded, intelligent person helping out Tintin. I find it to believe Hergé did not even give this fellow a name, who more than makes up for the eccentric college of eggheads whom Tintin is trying to help. "The Shooting Stars" is one of the best Tintin straightforward adventures and his adversary is more often the elements than the bad guys trying to beat the good ship "Aurora" to the meteorite. The contrast of Hergé's simple drawing of characters against more realistic backgrounds finds several excellent sequences in this story, the first to be originally printed in color.

As The Secret of Unicorn" opens, the Thom(p)sons are trying to solve a rash of pockets being picked and Tintin decides to buy on impulse a model of an old galliard ship. But suddenly two other gentleman want to buy the model from Tintin, who refuses because he intends the model to be a gift to his friend, Captain Haddock. Then Tintin finds a small piece of parchment that was hidden in one of the masts talking about a treasure and a ship called the Unicorn. The mystery deepens when it turns out that Sir Francis Haddock, an ancestor of Tintin's good friend, was the captain of the Unicorn. After the captain tells the exciting story of Sir Francis and his glorious victory over the dreaded Barbary buccaneers, Tintin races off to track down the final pieces of the puzzle that will tell where the treasure of the Unicorn can be found. By now Captain Haddock is as important to the story as Snowy. Nestor and Marlinspike Hall make their first appearance in "The Secret of the Unicorn" with Professor Calculus making his unforgettable first appearance in the second half of the tale, "Red Rackham's Treasure." Hergé is obviously staying as far away as he can from what is happening in Europe during World War II, but that does not take away from the fact this is a first rate tale of detective work by our intrepid hero and the second half is an equally fun adventure as Tintin and company race for "Red Rackham's Treasure." No wonder "The Adventures of Tintin" are one of the great comic book series in the history of the entire world.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars VIVA TINTIN, October 12, 1999
This review is from: The Adventures of Tintin, Vol. 3: The Crab with the Golden Claws / The Shooting Star / The Secret of the Unicorn (3 Volumes in 1) (Hardcover)
Tintin is wonderful, delightful, fun, and as a 26 year old I sitll enjoy it as much as when I was 5 years old. I think everybody should get to know these wonderful stories. You can read them over and over again and it feels like you are with the characters. The stories are funny, witty and truly adventerous. I RECOMMEND TINTIN (ANY OF HIS ADVENTURES) HIGHLY.....
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Too small - I have good eyes and difficult to read, December 22, 2011
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This review is from: The Adventures of Tintin, Vol. 3: The Crab with the Golden Claws / The Shooting Star / The Secret of the Unicorn (3 Volumes in 1) (Hardcover)
I loved reading TinTin about 30 yrs ago, but the book was about 8.5"x11". This book is only 5"x7", and is hard to read. I was very excited about the books, but now I am very disappointed. Don't waste your time buying the small sized books. If I have a hard time reading, then my kids will too. I have good 20/20 eye site, but won't if I read these books. I am returning the TinTin books I bought, and looking for the larger ones even if it costs more. If I buy them, I want my kids to enjoy them as much as I did when I was young.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great idea but the font is too small, June 14, 2011
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This review is from: The Adventures of Tintin, Vol. 3: The Crab with the Golden Claws / The Shooting Star / The Secret of the Unicorn (3 Volumes in 1) (Hardcover)
We borrowed the Tintin trilogy books from our local library and loved the idea of the books coming in a hardcover as opposed to papercover form because they were supposed to be for our kids (age 4 and 6). However the books we ordered on Amazon, Vol 2 and 3 were, unfortunately, slightly smaller than the library version. This made a difference, as the font size in the Amazon copy is small and fine. My husband and I sometimes have a difficult time reading the text but our kids love the books and they are being read every day since we purchased them Feb 2011.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A literary cartoon book, February 20, 2006
By 
D. Weinstein (Carpinteria, CA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Adventures of Tintin, Vol. 3: The Crab with the Golden Claws / The Shooting Star / The Secret of the Unicorn (3 Volumes in 1) (Hardcover)
This book was recommended to me by a High School Literature teacher for my 11 year old son. I bought one, and he was hooked. These books are quirky, colorful and fun, and actually do have some literary value. It's hard to find books for comic book fans (who don't want to read anything else!), but my son loves these and always asks for the next one when he finishes one. I don't want them to end, but alas..
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too small to read, December 7, 2011
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This review is from: The Adventures of Tintin, Vol. 3: The Crab with the Golden Claws / The Shooting Star / The Secret of the Unicorn (3 Volumes in 1) (Hardcover)
I bought this book to save a few bucks. I figured 3 books in one, why not? I was shocked to see the text as small as they could print to save money. Very disappointed.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BEST Comic characters, June 9, 1999
This review is from: The Adventures of Tintin, Vol. 3: The Crab with the Golden Claws / The Shooting Star / The Secret of the Unicorn (3 Volumes in 1) (Hardcover)
Reading any Tintin book is a joyous experience. It feels as if you are actually watching a movie, such is the power of the pictures with appropriate short and long shots, immaculate detail. Tintin books are not only humorous, but have wit, intelligence and superb buildup of the plot. Time flies before you are already on page 62 !
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Introducing Captain Haddock, November 26, 2004
By 
Gagewyn (United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Adventures of Tintin, Vol. 3: The Crab with the Golden Claws / The Shooting Star / The Secret of the Unicorn (3 Volumes in 1) (Hardcover)
Tintin is the best comic ever and here you have three of his adventures together. The first of these introduces the captain who becomes a regularly appearing character in the series. He was my favorite character when I was a child, so this may be a good selection if you are new to the series:

The Crab with the Golden Claws - On a visit to his friends the detectives Thomson and Thompson, Tintin recognizes a piece of paper torn from the label of a can. Earlier in the day Snowy had found the can with the rest of the label attached on the street. The label shows a picture of a red crab on a golden background and is evidence in an investigation into counterfeit money. Written on the back is the name of the ship. When Tintin accompanies the detectives on a visit to the ship, he is kidnapped and held in the hold as the ship leave port for an unknown destination...

The Shooting Star - One night a star appears to get larger and larger and a strange heat wave strikes. Tintin goes to the observatory to inquire, where he finds that the falling star, a meteor, will soon strike earth and cause the end of the world. The meteor strikes but earth is still OK, and so a scientific expedition is launched to find and study the meteor. What will they find?

The Secret of the Unicorn - Tintin purchases a model ship at an antiques market. Just after he purchases it two strangers arrive who want to buy the ship. Tintin won't sell it to them even though they offer him ten times what he paid for it. It is a gift for his friend Captain Haddock. The captain is amazed to get the model ship. He shows Tintin a painting of his ancestor, a captain. The captain's ship is visible in the background, and is identical to the model Tintin purchased. The secret to buried treasure is hidden in the model ship, but other parties are also after it...

These are all good stories and have jokes for adults as well as children. They are printed on smaller size paper than the separately bound stories, which is more economical but makes them harder to read and doesn't do the graphics justice. This is an economic edition for families, but libraries should invest in the larger separately bound stories.
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