Customer Reviews

1,904
4.6 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

188 of 199 people found the following review helpful
on February 20, 2013
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Billy Fingers takes us on a jaw-dropping journey through realms I couldn't have imagined and find it hard to believe anyone could make up. This is from a born skeptic. I don't know whether to credit Annie Kagan or Billy Fingers with the spectacular rendering of experiences that must have been very hard to put into words, let alone such consistently dazzling prose. Early on, I let go of whether I believed it and just floated along on the wild and moving ride. The message I took away is that life is an adventure we're meant to have no matter what twists and turns it takes. Thanks to Billy we can now imagine the spiritual universe beyond our spec of a planet and the confines of a mortal body. It's a book I recommend highly and will return to when I find myself thinking small.
5757 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
314 of 337 people found the following review helpful
on May 11, 2013
Format: Paperback
First of all, I am a medium so I have an inside track on communication with those who have passed on. Yes, I deliver messages to the grieving all the time, in all kinds of circumstances, from those who passed 2 weeks ago to those who passed 40 years ago. I read all the afterlife communication books, looking for ones that I can recommend to clients - and I strongly recommend this one. This one is the real deal, and you will do yourself a favor by reading it. Those who pass on can and do communicate with us, and you are sensitive to their messages or you are not, that is the truth. No amount of begging heaven for a message will work for you if you are not sensitive. And no one author has it all about the next life, but this one has most of it. No, I don't have any financial interest in the book, nor do I know Ms. Kagan, but I know the truth when I read it, so my advice is: If you are genuinely interested in the afterlife, read this one. If on the other hand you want to believe only one story about the next life, then don't read it, because you will not find your fixed view here. But I have found that among my clients, once they get the proofs they need, including the "secret" words, songs or phrases that they asked their loved one for before they came to see me, then they wake up from the delusions of "religion" and learn to think for themselves. AMEN TO THAT!!!!
2222 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
149 of 158 people found the following review helpful
on March 3, 2013
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
My spiritual journey has taken me to many houses of worship, to countless bookstores, to thousands of hours of reading, to purchases at new age shops, to expensive sessions with mediums, to meditation and of course to the worldwide web. I have struggled through Jane Roberts' 'Seth' books, studied 'A Course in Miracles' aligned my chakras and tried to be a sponge and soak up all I could learn.

Yesterday my friend Susan, posted on Facebook about the release of this book 'The Afterlife of Billy Fingers'. I immediately purchased and downloaded it on my Kindle. I followed Billy's journey, thanks to Annie and Billy. I cried and I laughed and I learned a lot, through their journey. This morning when the book ended, I needed MORE! I want to thank the powers that be for the permission they must have given to help Billy be able to tell his story, and also for Annie to be able to hear it.

I wish I had read this book years ago or something like it. The beauty and simplicity and wonder touched my soul unlike all the other books I have ever read before. Trust me when I tell you, I have been reading 2 to 3 books a week since 5th grade and I will be 59 years old this coming Friday.I guess you can say I know what I like when it comes to books. This one was a life changer. If your search brought you here, it was for a very good reason. READ THIS BOOK!
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
135 of 146 people found the following review helpful
Format: Paperback
Author Annie Kagan and her "bad-boy brother" had been somewhat estranged their entire life, largely due to his lifelong addictions and sometimes shady lifestyle. A call from the police department announcing her brother's death may have been unexpected, but his death was not so surprising given that his was a life lived life on the edge. But when Billy suddenly began to communicate with his sister from the after-life, Annie was surprised, disbelieving, and reluctant to share this news with others.

Through a series of cryptic messages from Billy that materialize in Annie's life (and others), along with the support of a writing group, Billy convinces Annie that she must write this book. The result is this fascinating preview of what happens when we die, one that is both quirky and uplifting. In the genre of after-life communications this book stands out for many reasons. But in particular, the detailed descriptions Billy offers of his after-life experiences are `refreshing,' in that they transcend the culturally filtered images we have become somewhat accustomed to, and reveal glorious galaxies of universal awareness and experience. For example:

"After our last visit, I was drifting through the Universe, taking in the sights, when a cosmic wind began to circle me like a slow tornado...Then it was like someone pressed the start button on a cosmic projector and the ring became a circular movie that's still playing all around me. What I'm looking at is very different from any film I've seen in a theater, though. First of all, I'm suspended in the middle of the Universe, and second the entire move is playing all at once and the images are holographic...What's really great is that this hologram has a very special feature...My hologram is expandable. I can follow all the different paths I didn't take when I was alive and see how they would have turned out. What's surprising, though, is that it doesn't seem like one way is more valuable than any others. I don't have a preference. It's all fascinating, and I have no regrets."

..."Here, our telepathic communications fill each other with beauty. Speaking of telepathy, I know you've sometimes wondered if there's any music here. There are so many clichés about angels singing and harps playing...well, once again I can only speak for myself. There aren't exactly any of those things where I am. Here the atmosphere is filled with a soft, ambient sound...There's a constant background haze that reminds me of earth's natural sounds, like wind or rain or ocean waves...Recently, I began to notice that sometimes this haze bursts into a little melody and then that melody quickly disappears. This melody phenomenon is happening more and more, and I really can't say if it's the sound that's changed, or my ability to hear it."

Through Billy's communications and the author's insightful retrospective, readers are taken on an after-life journey that is vivid and inspiring. Billy opens powerful vistas of the after-life, which in turn invite deep contemplation and wisdom for the living. And while this is also an intimate (but not maudlin) look at how a brother and sister learn to navigate a connection through the veils, we also come to understand that each, in their own way, becomes spiritually liberated as a result of what might at first glance, seem to be a tragedy. Highly recommended reading.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
75 of 84 people found the following review helpful
on February 20, 2013
Format: Paperback
The narritive has a life of it's own. the writing can be poetic at times and the underlying message of persoanl redemption remains profound. So refreashing to read a book from a new novelist that is able to capture our hearts and our minds allowing us to question our previous beliefs regarding the afterlife with such complete abandon. The book reads like a privite retreat since it delivers such intimate messages connectionning us to the universal matrix. Kagen reminding us that we are never alone and always connected makes for a nirvana like feeling and the calmness can be contagious!! I would BUY this book for anyone going thru a loss due to death or addition , or anone who wants to know more about what life hold beyond death. and for us here on earth right now.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
on October 8, 2014
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
Each reader can decide if he/she believes in the he veracity of the conversations between the author and her dead brother. I am disappointed with the book on a number of other levels. First, it is too much about the author and her constant angst and mental suffering, her depression, and her unabated sorrow. Strange for someone who spends the day meditating. She shows no real change in perspective or attitude after having been visited by her deceased brother- on multiple occasions no less. Not only that, but he communicates all these esoteric secrets about the afterlife. If I ever saw my deceased father, even if he didn't speak about anything, my life would change dramatically. Second, The "About the Author" at the end of the book tells us that Kagan is versed in Indian mysticism. Strangely, her deceased brother, who had no background in Indian mysticism, spouts off abundantly about these themes during his many conversations with his sister the author. It made me suspiscious that perhaps Kagan was putting words in her deceased brother's mouth. Third, the deceased Billy's version of "heaven," as a place of unconditional love- and no responsibility for wrong-doing, is indeed comforting to those whose lives on earth have been rough. It is less comforting to those who have been victimized by brutes and bullies for political, religious or cultural reasons. I'm sorry I bought this book based on an interesting free sample.
44 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
207 of 247 people found the following review helpful
on April 17, 2013
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
I bought this book after reading so many 5 star reviews. Honestly, I was disappointed. I WANTED to like it. I've been interested in life after death experiences for probably 30 years or more and have read many books on the subject. In addition, I also had a "bad boy" brother who had a very similar life to the author's own brother, right down to his cause of death. So, there were parts of the story, that resounded hope and truth and quite frankly, reflected my own beliefs or at least what I HOPE to be real. Here's what didn't ring true exactly for me. Mind you, I am NOT suggesting that the author was fabricating her story. I cannot dispute the fact that she communicated with her brother after his death. I just feel that she has a very firm belief in her philosophy,(obviously she has studied eastern religion and most likely western too), and that perhaps, in parts shared with the reader what SHE believes is fact. First of all, the way the author writes when using her brother's words seems very formal. His manner of speech just didn't seem to be natural. I kept thinking, "is THAT how her brother spoke to her when he was alive?" It sounded almost biblical. Also regarding the parts where Ms. Kagan stated she researched some of the Sanskrit terms after her brother used them, I felt that just the opposite, had happened. In other words, it was as if Ms.Kagan had done the research FIRST and then inserted it into the story. There are plenty of folks who'll disagree with my opinion I'm sure. Unfortunately, I became very weary while reading the descriptions in the last few chapters of this book. If Billy and Ms.Kagan were given the spiritual task of writing THE book on the afterlife, I'm sorry to say, I think it could've been more interesting to the average person searching for the comfort that the author herself has found. Could this have been due to editing??? This past year, I lost another brother and in my grief, began a quest once again to find out just where one's soul goes after death. This is the main reason I read this book. And although I DO share many of Ms Kagan's beliefs, I did not find the comfort I sought. I have to say, that it DID help me, however. I now feel like abandoning my search. After all no one really knows the secret, except those who have already crossed over. As Eckhart Tolle said during an interview once, and I'm paraphrasing,...It will be a big surprise!
132132 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
38 of 43 people found the following review helpful
on March 20, 2013
Format: Paperback
This was filmed the morning after reading this amazing book in one day. It is a page turner that I didn't want to put down. I share my own NDE (Near Death Experience) briefly in this video as well.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
38 of 44 people found the following review helpful
on February 23, 2013
Format: Paperback
It's impossible to put into words how much of a seminal work this is for anyone who has seen someone close to them pass on to the other side. Whatever fear I ever had of the unknown was immediately destroyed by the amount of detail provided by this book. This isn't one of those books where it's 90% fluff and a little "experience"...this is a masterpiece of writing told through heartfelt personal narrative with play by play action from beyond told by Billy! I only wish I could experience the first read all over again. My deepest thanks go to Billy and Annie for sharing this gift to humanity!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
72 of 87 people found the following review helpful
on February 22, 2014
Format: Paperback
If there is no judgement, no right and wrong, and the life we live on Earth is our own personal execution of inner lessons that must be learned (as is repeatedly claimed by Annie Kagan through her connection with 'Billy'), why did 'Billy' see fit to save Annie's best friend Tex from her drinking habit? Isn't a drinking habit part of a person's life? If a person chooses to drink to drown their sorrows, isn't that free will? Isn't that part of the lesson they're on Earth to learn? Why would Billy stage what you deemed to be an intervention and which I interpret as *interference* if, as Billy claimed, there is no right and wrong.

This is a glaring problem because Billy - particularly toward the end of the book - presumably has access to sources of information beyond comprehension, and yet he makes a fundamental logical error here. He claims again and again that nothing we do on Earth is bad, and then identifies a drinking habit as bad, worthy of saving Tex from herself, over-arching the supposed free will message. Moreover, if death is merely a transition, why is it so vitally important that Billy prevent the death not only of Tex (from her worsening drinking habit) but also fo Annie Kagan's ex-husband who would surely have died without Billy's intervention.

How can human behaviour be neutral in all forms but still be wrong in some forms. Who is Billy - a self professed drug addict and alcoholic - to pass judgement on the habits of a living human being in any case? There are many such paradoxes in the book, all of which, I'm afraid, reveal the author to be either deluded, insane or extremely imaginative. I wish I could say that Annie Kagan at least *believed* she was in touch with her dead brother's spirit, but grief can do incredible things to the human brain, and by Annie's own admittance she has been involved in certain aspects of esoteria for a long time (she was already an expert on meditation prior to her contact with Billy).

The answer then is that she was either deluded, or imaginative. Either could apply, but I suspect the former because paranoid delusions can be incredibly intricate, as in this case. The author has interwoven the events of her unfolding life into the delusion of her grief and forged connections that simply are not there. I'm certain some were coincidental, others forced, others made up. Not to say that the author deliberately made them up to sell books, but I do believe someone who is an amateur writer would find writing a cathartic outlet for exorcising some of the pain of losing a loved one.

I'm compelled to say that the issue is compounded by the troubled relationship between Annie and her brother, which almost certainly tipped the author over the edge in terms of her delusion. Psychological dysfunction resulting from grief is actually rarer than you'd think, but where there's an enormous strain - as there was in this case, and one that had been re-occurring for many years - there is invariably psychological fallout for survivors of the event.

In closing, the book is incredibly well formulated and written. Annie Kagan, if you are reading this, you are a wonderful writer, but there are so many paradoxes I'm afraid you simply cannot be right with your conclusions. I think the writing of this book was probably as helpful to you as grief counselling would be for many others, but I suspect the problem cannot be eradicated. Like pushing down bubbles in wallpaper. You push one down, it just pops up somewhere else. Do you find that you are still troubled by the death of your brother? Despite everything? If the answer is yes, I would urge you to consider my review not just as a criticism or skepticism but as an indication that you might need to re-evaluate what you have experienced.

I don't doubt The Afterlife of Billy Fingers gives hope to others, but ultimately it's false hope and when people live their lives based on false information they often come unstuck and society comes unstuck with them.

If you intend to buy this book, please assume you are reading at best a work of fiction, at worst a glimpse into the mind of someone who is troubled by the loss of a family member. It is, in many ways, also an incredible insight into the complexities the brain endeavours to create in order to convince itself it is right - as is the case with most, if not all, delusional states. And for this reason the book has a certain merit.

I look forward to seeing something (honestly) fictional by the author, whose writing talent is undeniable and whose sharp mind deserves to be turned toward something more genuine and less disingenuous.
55 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.