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140 of 146 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Thoughtful and Memorable Perspective on Conscious Aging
*****
The Age of Miracles: Embracing the New Midlife describes a refreshing way to approach midlife, not viewing midlife through glasses emphasizing decline and loss, but through a framework of endless possibility, wisdom, an embracing of and creation of new meaning, a turning towards life, a realization of the limitlessness of God, a forgiving of the past, a...
Published on January 14, 2008 by O. Brown

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76 of 92 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Self-indulgent and depressing
I was so excited when I heard about this book, having just turned 50 and looking for some positive inspiration. Although I'm generally a fan of Marianne Williamson's books, this one was sadly disappointing. She seems focused on grieving the loss of her youth, beauty & energy in most of the book which I found depressing. Then she reverts to the same thoughts & prayers...
Published on May 31, 2008 by Savonna Blackwell


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Baby Boomers' Midlife a Turning Point for Humanity, April 6, 2008
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I love how Marianne Williamson is willing to be honest about the lessons we all learn in consciousness. Like others, she definitely believes that our thoughts create our reality - however, she is one of the very few who is willing to say that any expansion or improvement in the state of our consciousness is often gained through the repetition of many trials and errors.

So many of the self-help books today make it sound like all you have to do is think positively. And if you're not getting the results you want, the insinuation is that there must be some flaw in your character. But from my own experience, not dealing with what is already negative within us is like trying to seal up an infected wound.

Marianne honestly and artfully describes the need to understand this throughout the book. In the chapter titled "I Will Survive" she says, "...nothing is a more powerful state of being than a deep acceptance of what is. Too often we inquire about a situation, 'How can I change this?' when we should be asking, 'How can I dwell within this circumstance in the highest possible way?'" In yoga philosophy this would be called the path of surrender, one of several paths to spiritual enlightenment.

As the book progresses the discussion turns from relationships to more global issues and the survival of our species, not to mention all other life, with a sense of urgency and purpose.

The author and I appear to have grown up during the same span of time, so I relate very clearly to her references of life during the 60's and 70's. And I agree that mid-life is like a different kind of puberty. I have felt the call she describes to become more of myself, to be more authentic and to aspire to fulfull my highest and best purpose in this life very intensely in the past 10 years.

This book represents a turning point in the collective experience of baby boomers everywhere. Just as we stirred things up in the late 60's and early 70's, the transition to mid-life of this huge demographic group is sure to make some waves again.

Like Marianne says, it's hard to understand aging until you've been there. As complacent as our society has become in dealing with social problems, it's time for the baby boomers to rise again and take a new stand in the effort to raise global consciousness to a higher level.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An interesting read on embracing midlife, February 14, 2008
Marianne Williamson continues her teaching on "A Course in Miracles" in her latest book on embracing midlife. She explains that it is your thoughts that determine what's possible for you at midlife, just as it is at every other point in your life.

She makes the excellent point that when we're younger we tend to say "yes" to life, but sometimes as we get older we begin to say "no" to anything outside our comfort zone. Later in the book, she goes on to say, "Excitement doesn't knock at your door any less when you're older than when you're younger. It's just that when you're younger, you're more likely to open the door and let it in." Good observation!

She also shows a sense of humor at times, like half-way through the book I noticed every chapter name was part of a classic 70's or 80's song, like "Do You Believe in Magic?," "I Will Survive" and "The Way She'd Act and the Color of Her Hair." She also quips at one point that we often excuse bad behavior by saying things like, "But inside, he's just a wounded little boy," to which she says her friend once replied, "So was Hitler." She concludes by saying the fact that she has compassion for someone doesn't mean she shouldn't delete them from her BlackBerry, because damaged people damage people.

On the whole, though, the book is pretty serious...some of Marianne's earlier books seemed somehow more funny and hopeful than this one. I get a sense of sorrow in this book, as if she may have been experiencing some regrets or going through a tough time when she wrote it. But that may just be my interpretation.

It is a very good book and well worth reading!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great up until the last two chapters, June 26, 2008
This book totally met me where I'm at as my son is a teenager and I'm looking to my life when he has flown the nest and I'm older and grayer. She has a great persepective on growing older and embracing it. Her book really helped me to not be so afraid of growing older as is so prevalent in our society, but to embrace my greatness as I get older. Her last two chapters left me bewildered. She totally moves into a rant about the world and politics and the only way to combat the bad stuff going on in the world is with LOVE. I don't disagree with what she has to say, but how did this book move in this direction? The last two chapters left me a little disappointed in her book in general.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Reminder, February 8, 2008
By 
Funny Girl (Glendora, CA United States) - See all my reviews
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I have followed Marianne Williamson since I first heard about her in 1991. She is an excellent lecturer/speaker & author, which is why I purchased the AUDIO verison of this book. The information is important & envigorating, especially when read by Marianne herself.
This book reminds us that the years after 50 can be much fuller than the 2 decades prior. We have so much to offer ourselves & others. This is truly a time to embrace life & the miracles that occur every day.
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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Age Of Miracles?, February 9, 2008
The Age of Miracles: Embracing the New MidlifeI haven't finished this book yet, as I find it rather difficult to "get into". I am finding the book a bit waffly, talking in vague generalities that seem to go on, without reaching a simple conclusion, or providing the reader with here and now steps or suggestions to begin the new journey - a bit like taking a maths class without giving specific formulas to try.I also wonder if the Author at times is having a conversation with herself, or speaking to Middle Aged women generally? I think the book makes some positive and relevant points and observations, in addition to asking some poignant questions, but overall find it rather self indulgent. The simple straightfoward prayers inserted here and there are lovely, and worthy of inclusion in ones daily life. As I am only half way through the book, I have given it a three rating, as any higher or lower would be unfair.
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23 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Spiritual, Logical, Loving and WISE Voice, January 10, 2008
By 
John W. Schlatter (Grand Junction, Colorado) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
When one reads this book it becomes evident that Martha Williamson does not 'believe' in God she KNOWS God...Her spiritual views are so universal, she would be a welcome voice in most houses of worship....
Reading her words convinces one that there IS a loving spiritual force in this universe who created and loves....
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great advice for a new and conscious way of living, December 30, 2009
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I liked this book because it really makes you think on what you want to do with the rest of your life. Up to a certain point your life does start when you hit midlife. You view life and the world differently by then. And you don't have much more time left to fool around, you really have to focus on what you truly want and how you want to experience it. Before this age you might have lived the life you needed to live, and not the life you wanted (which is my case), in order lo learn many things. But at this point you are entitled and obliged to live the life you really want to live.

The author gives good advice as to how we should live after we hit the midlife line in our life odometer. You can take it or leave it, but she does have a point. When you hit midlife it's more likely that you already have a different perspective of life due to experience and that you are more mature (which you reach at any age or not at all), so you can totally relate to her own experiences and enjoy her advice. You can even try changing some attitude traits and ideas for your best interest and improvement as human beings. The book is oriented to women, but men wont get hurt if they read it. They might even learn a couple of things and understand what women go through when they reach midlife.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best is Yet to Come, March 18, 2008
I have long respected the writing of Marianne Williamson. Her latest book was the most comfortable of everything I have read of hers.

I like books that stretch my thinking. This book did not really do that for me. But, what it did so beautifully was to soothingly add some context to the journey of life. I thoroughly enjoyed both the book and the author's reading of the book on audio tape.

Anyone racing through life and wondering about the meaning of life will enjoy the author's perspective and her sharing of personal vignettes that illustrate her point that our best years can be in front of us. This book has a wonderful sense of peace and hope.

Tired of self help books written from gurus preaching at you from on high? This book is a refreshing contrast to that model. The author shares her wisdom with a clear sense that she too is on a journey to understand this thing we call life. She does so in a manner that has the reader feeling, at least for the moment (and hopefully longer) that life is like a beautiful flower unfolding and reaching toward the heavens.

Well done, Marianne. And to think that your best is yet to come.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "A Must Read", April 8, 2009
By 
Mary K. (Massachusetts) - See all my reviews
I read The Age of Miracles by Marianne Williamson at the suggestion of a dear friend during a difficult and trying time in my life. Having read Return To Love many years ago - and enjoying it, I thought it would be worthwhile taking a peek though I wasn't sure that I could get through any book given my depressed state. At first I could only read a page a night... soon I was reading chapter after chapter and wanting more. My spirits began to improve and so did my ability to cope - while my situation has not changed, I have.

Thank you Marianne Williamson - Your insights and especially your frequent prayers served as a beacon of light in the distance and a life preserver that I could float on for now until I can gain the strength to swim to shore. You have a special gift.. thank you for sharing it with the rest of the world. From a very grateful mother and wife - With Love.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Women - great book for all ages!, November 24, 2008
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Marianne's wisdom is such a welcome example of the so called "mid-life" that a lot of us currently find ourselves. I'm a firm beliver that 60 is the new 40 and I'm blessed to experience that fact each and everyday of my life. The reason it is so easy for me is the availability of books like this one that remind us of "who we really are" and show us a kinder, gentler way of "being" in this world. I would recommend this book to any woman, but especially those who don't yet understand how blessed we are to have reached this glorious mid-life experience!
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The Age of Miracles: Embracing the New Midlife
The Age of Miracles: Embracing the New Midlife by Marianne Williamson (Paperback - January 31, 2008)
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