Automotive Holiday Deals Up to 50% Off Select Books Shop Men's Athletic Shoes Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon Prime Music Sweepstakes egg_2015 All-New Amazon Fire TV Grocery Gifts for Her Amazon Gift Card Offer cm15 cm15 cm15 $30 Off Amazon Echo $30 Off Fire HD 6 Kindle Cyber Monday Deals Cyber Monday Video Game Deals Shop Now Tikes
The Sun Also Rises: The Hemingway Library Edition and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

The Sun Also Rises

Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering
Start reading The Sun Also Rises: The Hemingway Library Edition on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Sun Also Rises [Paperback]

Ernest Hemingway
3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,172 customer reviews)

List Price: $15.00
Price: $11.32 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $3.68 (25%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Gift-wrap available.
Want it Tuesday, Dec. 1? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Hero Quick Promo
Holiday Deals in Kindle Books
Save up to 85% on more than 1,000 Kindle Books. These deals are valid until November 30, 2015. Learn more

Book Description

October 17, 2006
The quintessential novel of the Lost Generation, The Sun Also Rises is one of Ernest Hemingway's masterpieces and a classic example of his spare but powerful writing style. A poignant look at the disillusionment and angst of the post-World War I generation, the novel introduces two of Hemingway's most unforgettable characters: Jake Barnes and Lady Brett Ashley. The story follows the flamboyant Brett and the hapless Jake as they journey from the wild nightlife of 1920s Paris to the brutal bullfighting rings of Spain with a motley group of expatriates. It is an age of moral bankruptcy, spiritual dissolution, unrealized love, and vanishing illusions. First published in 1926, The Sun Also Rises helped to establish Hemingway as one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Take an Extra 30% Off Any Book: Use promo code HOLIDAY30 at checkout to get an extra 30% off any book for a limited time. Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks. Restrictions apply. Learn more | Shop now

Frequently Bought Together

The Sun Also Rises + For Whom the Bell Tolls + The Old Man and The Sea
Price for all three: $29.27

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

Page of Start over
This shopping feature will continue to load items. In order to navigate out of this carousel please use your heading shortcut key to navigate to the next or previous heading.

Editorial Reviews Review

The Sun Also Rises first appeared in 1926, and yet it's as fresh and clean and fine as it ever was, maybe finer. Hemingway's famously plain declarative sentences linger in the mind like poetry: "Brett was damned good-looking. She wore a slipover jersey sweater and a tweed skirt, and her hair was brushed back like a boy's. She started all that." His cast of thirtysomething dissolute expatriates--Brett and her drunken fiancé, Mike Campbell, the unhappy Princeton Jewish boxer Robert Cohn, the sardonic novelist Bill Gorton--are as familiar as the "cool crowd" we all once knew. No wonder this quintessential lost-generation novel has inspired several generations of imitators, in style as well as lifestyle.

Jake Barnes, Hemingway's narrator with a mysterious war wound that has left him sexually incapable, is the heart and soul of the book. Brett, the beautiful, doomed English woman he adores, provides the glamour of natural chic and sexual unattainability. Alcohol and post-World War I anomie fuel the plot: weary of drinking and dancing in Paris cafés, the expatriate gang decamps for the Spanish town of Pamplona for the "wonderful nightmare" of a week-long fiesta. Brett, with fiancé and ex-lover Cohn in tow, breaks hearts all around until she falls, briefly, for the handsome teenage bullfighter Pedro Romero. "My God! he's a lovely boy," she tells Jake. "And how I would love to see him get into those clothes. He must use a shoe-horn." Whereupon the party disbands.

But what's most shocking about the book is its lean, adjective-free style. The Sun Also Rises is Hemingway's masterpiece--one of them, anyway--and no matter how many times you've read it or how you feel about the manners and morals of the characters, you won't be able to resist its spell. This is a classic that really does live up to its reputation. --David Laskin --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

The publisher is using these two perennial favorites to launch its new Scribner Paperback Fiction line. This edition of Paradise marks the 75th anniversary of the smash 1920 first novel that skyrocketed Fitzgerald to literary stardom at the ripe old age of 23. Several years later, The Sun (1926), Hemingway's own first novel, performed an identical service for him at age 26. The line will eventually include additional titles by these giants as well as works by Edith Wharton, Langston Hughes, and other greats.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 251 pages
  • Publisher: Scribner (October 17, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743297334
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743297332
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,172 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,620 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
321 of 349 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hemingway's First Masterpiece! March 6, 2001
This, friends, was the single book that so fatefully launched Ernest Hemingway's amazing and long-lived literary career. As such it is as close to being a legendary book as they come, yet some seventy five years after its initial publication, it still offers a story that is also surprisingly fresh, personal, and memorable. For all of his obvious excesses, Hemingway was an artist compelled to delve deliberately into painful truths, and he attempted to do so with a style of writing that cut away all of the frills and artifice, so that at it s heart this novel is meant as a exploration into what it means to be adult and alive. Thus we are introduced to Jake Barnes, a veteran of World War One, now forced by his wounds to live as a man without the ability to act like one, forced by impotence to forgo all of life's usual intimacies, and all of its associated life connections for which he so yearns. At the same time, Jake attempts to live a life of meaning and purpose, one crammed full with activity, work, and friendships. Yet it is within this network of friendships and connections that he must confront his painful circumstances.

Enter his true love, the feckless Lady Ashley, and indeed the plot thickens, for we soon see how Jake's physical affliction has painfully affected several others. Ashley loves him, but needs a virile man who can give her the physical love she needs. While Ashley is a woman of uncommon beauty, she is also virtuous enough in her won way to want the one man she truly loves to be her lover. Like all of us, she wants most that which she can never have, and so she returns to the source of her own dilemma time after time to Jake, her emotional match, the one man who cannot give her the mature emotional love she craves.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Report abuse
112 of 121 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hemingway rules! Rargh! February 26, 2002
The Sun Also Rises is one of the few works of literature that shook me to the core, along with Remarque's Three Comrades, Gorky's autobiography, and Chekhov's The Lady With The Dog. I read a page and I was hooked. Bam, just like that. I read the thing in a day. In several hours, actually. And then I went and devoured the rest of the man's literary oeuvre. It's just that great. All the greater because when you really look at it, there's no dramatic action going on here - just some people talking, then going to Spain to see the bullfights. But don't let that fool you - boring this book ain't.
Jake Barnes, like most of the characters, is a veteran of World War I. A very unfortunate wound left physical love a complete impossibility for him, and thus he is left gnashing his teeth watching the woman he loves run around with all sorts of men. The Jewish Robert Cohn, who learned boxing in college in order to conquer his feelings of inferiority, happens to become smitten with her as well. Somehow, they and some of their friends and acquaintances end up going to Spain to experience the Fiesta, and while their experience starts the same giddy, frenzied, hedonistic way as for most people, it ends quite differently, when the book's darker undercurrents come to light. Insert scenes of cafe life, fishing, reminiscences, conversations with friends, watching the bullfights, some absolutely brutal humor, and lots and lots of liquor, and you've got yourself Hemingway's first masterpiece. Every element of every great Hemingway book can be seen here - plenty of vivid descriptions; moments of strange, elegiac melancholy; the human spirit fighting against the world; loneliness, isolation, and endurance. They're all here.
For some reason, this book seems to draw accusations of anti-Semitism.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Report abuse
156 of 173 people found the following review helpful
I have mixed feelings about this novel. On one level I appreciate it for the fine literary work that it is. In particular, I admire Hemmingway's use of symbolism throughout the novel. But at the same time, this isn't a novel I enjoyed reading. The novel features a cast of characters that are not especially likable and the first third of the novel moves a little too slowly (Jake and his friends lead aimless lives -and the first part of the novel is pretty aimless).

Jake and his fellow expatriates spend the entire novel getting drunk, being drunk, or recovering from having been drunk (or `tight' as they like to say). They pass their days eating, drinking and being as insensitive as possible to one another. It would be easy to dismiss these characters as unpleasant, and therefore uninteresting, but in the context of the years following WWI, I found myself feeling some sympathy for them.

Simply put, they're damaged goods. Jake, Mike, and Bill all fought in WWI(Jake becoming less of a man as a result) and were forever affected by it. They are now lost, drowning their empty aimless lives in alcohol.

Arguably, the most interesting character in the novel is Lady Ashley (Brett) who is a toxic influence on nearly every man she encounters. Jake, Mike, and Cohn are all in love with her to varying degrees and pay an emotional price as a result. Brett's self centered behaviour complicates the lives of the men who are enamored by her. Jake, who is impotent because of the war, demonstrates his love for Brett by helping her pursue men and then picking up the pieces when the affair ends badly.

There is no happiness for the lost generation in The Sun Also Rises and considerable irony in the novel's final sentence. I found this to be an interesting and insightful novel but I can't say I really `enjoyed' reading it. As a literary work this novel warrants 4 stars. As entertainment: 2 stars. Overall: 3 stars.
Was this review helpful to you?
Report abuse
Most Recent Customer Reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars No "Farewell to Arms"
This was a boring succession of inane conversations, bullying and underlying anti-Semitism. The use of a four letter word for a Jew is as offensive as the n____ word for African... Read more
Published 4 days ago by veronica campaniello
3.0 out of 5 stars Good book but if you need to cite it for ...
Good book but if you need to cite it for college paper you will have a hard time.
This is what came out if you try to search it by ISBN:
Tai yang ye zhao yang sheng qi:... Read more
Published 5 days ago by michael roy
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
Entertaining, a litter dated now.
Published 10 days ago by Amazon Customer
3.0 out of 5 stars Worth reading because it's Hemmingway
I liked that this was based on his own life experience , I wanted to see the view from this book vs. the Paris wife when he actually travels on this trip with theses people.
Published 17 days ago by Lisa Srithongsuk
2.0 out of 5 stars For such a famous classic I found it barely interesting.
It seemed like a continuous description of what they had to eat and drink each day- infinitum to no purpose. I had to force myself to keep on reading.
Published 21 days ago by Kindle Customer
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic story
The story of friends living life was very relatable and the dynamic of their time spent at the bull fights were honest and fun. Read more
Published 21 days ago by B.Short
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Published 25 days ago by BJT
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Published 27 days ago by S. Brunsvold
4.0 out of 5 stars Reading T*he Classics.
Either you like Hemingway or you don't. I like his "To the point" style of writing. Hemingway is a bit dated but a good story lasts forever. Read more
Published 28 days ago by ddusa
5.0 out of 5 stars Not much of a good read bu the ending was very soothing
It came really quickly.Not much of a good read bu the ending was very soothing. I definitely got closure on the characters.
Published 1 month ago by Darlyn Villalona
Search Customer Reviews

More About the Author

Ernest Hemingway ranks as the most famous of twentieth-century American writers; like Mark Twain, Hemingway is one of those rare authors most people know about, whether they have read him or not. The difference is that Twain, with his white suit, ubiquitous cigar, and easy wit, survives in the public imagination as a basically, lovable figure, while the deeply imprinted image of Hemingway as rugged and macho has been much less universally admired, for all his fame. Hemingway has been regarded less as a writer dedicated to his craft than as a man of action who happened to be afflicted with genius. When he won the Nobel Prize in 1954, Time magazine reported the news under Heroes rather than Books and went on to describe the author as "a globe-trotting expert on bullfights, booze, women, wars, big game hunting, deep sea fishing, and courage." Hemingway did in fact address all those subjects in his books, and he acquired his expertise through well-reported acts of participation as well as of observation; by going to all the wars of his time, hunting and fishing for great beasts, marrying four times, occasionally getting into fistfights, drinking too much, and becoming, in the end, a worldwide celebrity recognizable for his signature beard and challenging physical pursuits.

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Sun Also Rises
This item: The Sun Also Rises
Price: $11.32
Ships from and sold by

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions

Topic From this Discussion
rip off pricing
The publishers are certainly gouging the public when they charge over $12 for a kindle edition that costs a few cents to produce and distribute (marginal cost obviously) but it is not Amazon's fault and they should not be blamed. The publishers and Apple got together and agreed to fix prices.... Read More
Nov 9, 2012 by Ian S. Mccarthy |  See all 3 posts
why should or shouldn't we continue reading Why should The Sun Also...
When I was in high school in the sixties I read this book and thought it was great stuff, all these people living abroad, and having affairs, and getting drunk. Now that I am in MY sixties, and living abroad, these people seem kind of stupid, doing nothing worthwhile, getting drunk and being... Read More
Jul 13, 2012 by Amazon Customer |  See all 4 posts
Welcome to the Sun Also Rises forum
Hemingway employs the 'Iceberg Theory' of writing in which he believed that he would write only the 'facts', and the important themes are then allowed to shine through on their own. I think the important clue to the heart of the novel, 'The Sun Also Rises', is that (in Hemingway's own words),... Read More
Mar 18, 2013 by valis1949 |  See all 9 posts
Start a new discussion
First post:
Prompts for sign-in

Want to discover more products? Check out these pages to see more: heights prize for literary, best opening book page s, fighting clothes, madison and ashley book, expat fiction

Look for Similar Items by Category