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The Amadeus Net Unknown Binding

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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding: 238 pages
  • Publisher: ENC Press
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0975254014
  • ISBN-13: 978-0975254011
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,832,997 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Human-shaped, monkey-loving, robot-fighting, pirate-hearted, massively-bestselling wannabe, Mark is actually Canadian. By day he is a university prof and by night, a writer of humorous, satirical and fabulist novels, squibs and other drivel. (Some pure, and some quite tainted with meaning.) The Fridgularity is his newest novel. Pirate Therapy and Other Cures is a collection of short fiction. Marvellous Hairy is his second novel. His first book, The Amadeus Net, is heavier on the robots.

You can read more of his fiction (for free) at his website where you can also dig into his irregular and explosive blog, The Skwib (markarayner.com). Follow him at Twitter (@markarayner) or on Facebook (www.facebook.com/RaynerWriting).

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Debra Hamel VINE VOICE on August 14, 2005
Format: Unknown Binding
The premise of Mark Rayner's The Amadeus Net is an odd one. In 2028 Mozart--Wolfgang Amadeus, that is, the composer--is alive and well and 272 years old, blessed or cursed with immortality for reasons beyond his ken. Having faked his own death in 1791 he lives pseudonymously, currently as William Armstrong (note the initials), and has been supporting himself by selling new compositions as his own "lost" works. Eighteen years before the narrative begins a massive asteroid had hit the Earth's Antarctic pole, causing cataclysmic geographic changes, but in this ugly post-apocalyptic world Mozart and a few other visionaries founded a utopia, Ipolis, on an island that had only recently pushed its way above the surface of the Pacific Ocean. By design, Ipolis attracts artists and scientists from around the world, who work for the improvement of humanity in a highly computerized, networked society. The experiment might not have worked at all, except that Ipolis itself became--unbeknownst to its creators and inhabitants--a sentient being. As a benevolent near-god Ipolis looks after its residents, and the rest of the world to the extent that it can, keeping an eye in particular on its favorite son, Mozart.

During the week covered by Rayner's narrative the world outside Ipolis stands poised on the brink of nuclear war. And even in utopia things aren't perfect. An unscrupulous reporter suspects the truth about Will Armstrong and is bent on exposing him. With her posse of helpmates--a love-sick diplomat and an aging soldier of fortune--she pursues Mozart while he chases a pseudo-lesbian nurse, who herself has eyes for the reporter, who rebuffs the advances of the diplomat, who hooks up with the sadistic painter, who creates a high-tech piece of art based on Mozart's memories....
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mojo Brown on September 27, 2010
Format: Unknown Binding
I have said this before, and I shall say it again. Mark A Rayner tells a mean story. His first book is no exception. I like his character development, he writes of people with such detail you genuinely feel you know them. The Amadeus Net finds us in the not so distant future, after a planetary devastating event which kills off much of the population. It is revealed to us that Amadeus Mozart is alive and living on an island utopia incognito. An ambitious reporter will stop at nothing to find him and expose his secret. Surviving forces in the world threaten to destroy the remaining population, and the great composer is just looking for love. Clever, funny, and intriguing Rayner brings a story that yet again I found difficult to put down. This man is simply a great writer. Readers be on the lookout for one of the most interesting characters ever, I'll just refer to them as One. If you want to try something a little different, pick up Mark A Rayner's The Amadeus Net, or try his equally excellent Marvellous Hairy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Chayce on July 24, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
I sensed there was some element of The Odyssey beneath the surface of The Amadeus Net- or maybe The Iliad. I'm not well versed in Homer, but the backgrounds of a few Amadeus characters evoke those classic Greek myths. Regardless of whether I imagined that influence, Amadeus is a fantastic story told very well. The time and labour author Mark Rayner put into creating the characters within these pages is quickly apparent, and their eclectic richness pays off handsomely as the reader becomes deeply concerned with their individual and collective fates.

The story itself concerns Mozart (yes, that Mozart) who, in this fictional world, has a peculiar habit of not dying. As a result, he's alive and well in the near future, living on an isolated (though thriving) South Pacific island named Ipolis. His identity is, as you would expect, a long kept secret, and he would prefer it remained so. However, some are aware of his gift and view it as a grand opportunity for their own enrichment, and from there the trouble commences.

The story is simultaneously light, deep, silly and poignant. In the hands of a lesser author, an attempt like this could very well become a dispassionate dog's breakfast. But in Rayner's deft hands and mind, it leads the reader deep into the city which serves as the setting (and the city itself is actually a character in its own right!), and into the minds, hearts and souls of the characters. It seems a great many novels I read aren't able to focus on creating more than a couple of full, rich characters surrounded by cardboard plot devices. Not so with Amadeus, and there within, I believe, lies the book's greatest strength.
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