Buy Used
$7.95
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Good Condition. Eligible For Prime Shipping
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The American Century: Varieties of Culture in Modern Times Hardcover – April 1, 1997


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$7.95 $0.01
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 624 pages
  • Publisher: Harpercollins; 1st edition (April 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 006017451X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060174514
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.5 x 2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,675,541 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Norman Cantor writes as if he were present for each event and movement, both large and small, since 1900, so clear is his analysis of society, culture, and politics. In this massive book Cantor tackles seemingly everything--whether modernism, folk music, psychoanalysis, or the atomic bomb--placing each in its proper context while cleverly intertwining themes and drawing intriguing comparisons. A distinguished scholar of history, sociology, and comparative history, Cantor deftly incorporates a staggering amount of information and observations into a coherent package that will challenges readers' perceptions and ideas. Spiced with wit and wisdom, The American Century is at turns brilliant, controversial, and fascinating.

From Library Journal

A revised and expanded version of Twentieth Century Culture, Modernism to Deconstruction (Lang, 1988), this is a wonderful summing up of Western civilization in the 20th century, with fascinating chapters on modernism, psychoanalysis, Marxism, fascism, and Postmodernism. This should be in all public and college libraries.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By giunta@maple.lemoyne.edu on October 28, 1997
Format: Hardcover
First, I enjoyed the book a great deal. It was incredibly thought-provoking and stimulating. Therefore, whatever its shortcomings, it is truly an impressive achievement and a remarkable tour de force.
My complaint is that the author appears seriously misinformed on some of the scientific subjects about which he writes. Granted, Cantor is not a natural scientist, and the book is not primarily about science. Still, what he chooses to include about chemistry and physics ought to be correct. For example (p. 19), Cantor is completely mistaken about the role of the periodic table in modern chemistry (or, as he would have it, the lack of a role); he even gives the wrong date for its discovery (no later than 1869, not 1890 as stated). I can be less categorical about a quotation of Einstein's purporting to show that Einstein knew his theory of relativity was akin to philosophical relativism; however, based on the content and date of the quote (1928) and on my knowledge that relativity retains the principle of causality, I think the quote is much more likely to be about quantum mechanics, about which Einstein (as Cantor notes) had serious misgivings.
Rather than belabor examples, I'll close by stating that these errors undermined the book's authority in my eyes. Granted, a book as opinionated as this generates a healthy skepticism in any critical reader: that is part of the book's attraction and, I assume, part of the author's intent. But by writing inaccurately about matters I know about (I am a chemist), Cantor makes me wonder which, if any, of the other subjects reflect similar misinformation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 1, 1999
Format: Paperback
Today, New Year's Day 1999, I spent reading the first 170 pages or so of Cantor's book. Pages fly by; it is readable. But it is also superficial, sometimes factually wrong. At one point, the periodic table of elements is presented as an anachronism leftover from the Victorian age. Chemists today, he claims, would not recognize it. "... most chemists today would not even know the periodic table, nor would they have a use for it." (p. 19, paperback edition). That's sheer idiocy, as any practicing chemist would tell you. Inorganic chemistry is essentially the further development of the great periodic table.
My time today was not wasted - but beware.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 17, 1998
Format: Paperback
in his attempt to be comprehensive,norman cantor's survey of twentieth century thought is often superficial. his history of the jews, "the sacred chain", was deeper, more intellectually stimulating and infuriating.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Robert Borosage on December 23, 1999
Format: Paperback
The subject and scope is enticing, but this book demonstrates why the book industry must resuscitate editors. The authors' writing is wooden, repetitive and, finally, irritating. After 50 pages, it drove me to the comparative pleasures of a text on economics.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again