Buy New
$7.95
Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Tuesday, April 22? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

The American Revolution: 1763 - 1783 Paperback – June 1, 1960

ISBN-13: 978-0717800056 ISBN-10: 0717800059 Edition: New edition

Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Paperback, June 1, 1960
"Please retry"
$7.95
$6.50 $3.81

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

The American Revolution: 1763 - 1783 + Early Years of the Republic:  from the end of the Revolution to the first administration of Washington (1783-1793)
Price for both: $13.90

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Intl Pub; New edition edition (June 1960)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0717800059
  • ISBN-13: 978-0717800056
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 5.5 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,762,377 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Brady Simmons on June 27, 2000
Herbert Aptheker presents a new idea on the nature of the American revolution. In this book, he presents that the American Revolution was not a revolution in the traditional sense, but rather the first successful colonial rebellion in the world. It was not a revolution because there was no sense of nation until after the revolution started. There were no significant social or cultural changes that came about from the actions of the Americans. Aptheker shows considerable amount of proof to support his thesis and does a good job at proving his point. He defines a revolution and a rebellion and gives an example or each. He gives the causes that made the colonies rebel against England. And he gives some of the significant effects of the war for the colonies. The causes of the conflict derive from social contradiction. The reason why there was a failure to compromise was due to the fact that the contradiction could not be compromised. The only way that the Colonies and England could settle their problems was through war. The antagonism, Britain, had to be removed. Things were happening in Britain that was changing the attitudes that she held for her American colonies. The Industrial Revolution needed a market and raw materials that were bot to be found in Britain. Britain turned to the colonies as a source of materials and a captive market for her finished goods. The trade laws all favored Britain because it was in her interests to keep the balance of trade on her side. Of the trade acts enacted against the colonies, the worst were the Sugar and Stamp Acts. The Sugar Act put a duty on molasses, refined sugar, wine, silk, and indigo. It also banned the importation of foreign liquors. All duties had to be paid in silver, depleting the stores that the colonies had.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa5796e04)