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The Amish Cook's Baking Book Hardcover


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The Amish Cook's Baking Book + The Amish Cook at Home: Simple Pleasures of Food, Family, and Faith + The Amish Cook's Anniversary Book: 20 Years of Food, Family, and Faith
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing (October 20, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0740785478
  • ISBN-13: 978-0740785474
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 10.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #192,436 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Together with editor Kevin Williams, Elizabeth Coblentz founded "The Amish Cook" newspaper column and later coauthored the column's namesake inaugural cookbook. Today, Lovina Eicher, Elizabeth's daughter, pens the column that continues to share Amish culture, tradition, and recipes with a nationally syndicated audience of more than 130 newspapers throughout the United States. Lovina lives in Michigan with her husband, Joe, and their eight children. Kevin lives in Ohio.

Together with editor Kevin Williams, Elizabeth Coblentz founded "The Amish Cook" newspaper column and later coauthored the column's namesake inaugural cookbook. Today, Lovina Eicher, Elizabeth's daughter, pens the column that continues to share Amish culture, tradition, and recipes with a nationally syndicated audience of more than 130 newspapers throughout the United States. Lovina lives in Michigan with her husband, Joe, and their eight children. Kevin lives in Ohio.

Online:


oasisnewsfeatures.com

twitter.com/theamishcook

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
27
4 star
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See all 38 customer reviews
Helpful to the novice or experienced cook.
Diane Middleton
Love baking and this book just added to the desire to bake good treats for the family.
Romantic Heart
The recipes are clear,concise, and easy-to-follow.
THE SELF-TAUGHT COOK

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By LadyAtTheGate on June 6, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I was given this cookbook from a relative who knew that I loved to go get authentic Amish food whenever I visited her in Indiana. While I cannot make these recipes to the caliber of the wonderful Amish ladies up north this cookbook has been really useful in making some lovely dishes.

First a bit of background about this book: Some people have commented on the little stories that are dispersed throughout this cookbook. The reason for this other than obviously providing interest is that these recipes are mainly just a compilation of stories and recipes written by Lovina that are published in various newspapers in the Midwest. From what I was told her mother originally started the column and after she passed Lovina took over the role of writing the column.

As far as the recipes go I feel like they are pretty fool proof. I read one review that complained that sometimes ranges instead of exact measurements were given. I have actually found this to be useful. For example some of the breads may taste better with more or less flour depending upon the oven you are using. Hence, when Lovina suggests 6-7 cups of flour for a recipe you have to either be intuitive enough about food to know when you've used the right amount or you may just want to make up the recipe using various amounts of flour to find what you like best. Regardless of how you make up the recipe though, I have always found that the resulting food is always quite tasty.

One thing I have found is that a lot of the recipes call for allowing the breads to rise multiple times. I have discovered that my recipes often turn out better if you simply place the bread in the proper pan or tin and then let it rise once in the container before cooking. This allows you to get lighter and fluffier rolls and breads.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By J. L. Estrada on December 31, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a beautifully presented and produced book. And, the cultural history aspects make for very interesting reading. However, there are so many major errors in the recipes, themselves, that they should only be attempted by experienced bakers who will be able to spot them and know how to correct them. For example, the Cherry Coffeecake recipe completely omits any liquid of any kind. An experienced baker will know that a cake recipe that calls for three cups of flour will need about 3/4C of milk or othe acidic liquid to activate the baking powder. Otherwise, you are making sugar cookie dough instead of cake batter. Some of the bread recipes say that they make one loaf when they actually make two. These are just two examples of the many erroneous recipies in this otherwise beautiful book. The errors are major and would lead a novice baker into culinary disaster. Best to stick to classic baking books and give this one a pass unless you are already very confident in the kitchen.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Jacob on November 23, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I baked the Dilly bread tonight and it came out perfect. I was so good. I have never cooked with Dill weed, but I loved it.
Thanks for the cookbook.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jeanne M. Maze on June 28, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm in love with this book, and the complete and simple way it is written. I love the child's stories, too. It speaks to my heart, and the inner baker in me. I'm working my way through it, page by page. If they can do all these things without all my modern conveniences, surely I can do as well.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By NancyLeeIL on July 21, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is a beautiful book. If you love reading about Amish life in words and pictures and have always wanted to stand beside an Amish woman and cook with her...this is a wonderful book.

My caution is that I think I would not give this book to someone who isn't an experienced cook. There are some issues.

I baked the Homemade Bread as my first recipe. The recipe reads it makes 1 loaf. The ingredients when I read them make me think, hmmm, this seems like it would make at least two loaves (9x5 standard pan). 2 1/2 cups of water is going to need quite a bit of flour to form a soft dough ball, and it did.

Against all my cooking sense, but being someone who always follows a recipe as "is" first, then tweaks it, I did put it in one loaf pan, but watched it carefully. As it began to ooze as it rose all over the sides of the pan...I took the dough, punched it down, split it into TWO loaf pans and let it rise, and even those loaves were a good size loaf.

BUT the taste was absolutely delicious. So I think if you are familiar enough with cooking and recipes, you'll do well with this cookbook. The recipes look yummy and seem tried and true which sounds like it would be a great cookbook for a new cook or baker, but based on this first recipe I tried, I'd hesitate. Their alarms wouldn't go off when they read 2 1/2 cups of water for one loaf, for instance. I can't say anything about the other recipes because I haven't tried them. But I will be trying more of them based on how we all loved the bread.

The next recipe in the book is a recipe that is for bread for those who can't tolerate yeast. Just thought I'd mention that as well.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By em-il-ie on October 22, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The other books which preceded this "The Amish Cook" and "The Amish Cook at Home" both had a start of something good. "The Amish Cook" was a clunky read and did not flow well; recipes were not always clear and almost no photos were included. "The Amish Cook at Home" improved on narrative, being the best of the three as far as informative and engaging storytelling, but still lacked photos of the recipes. This most recent volume "The Amish Cook's Baking Book" is a great third book, showing progress, careful thought and more editorial finesse. There were beautiful photos in the book, just not many showing food. And that was a major drawback.

This book has a great narrative voice and includes not only Lovina's voice, but as with the prior book, includes small vignettes written by the children which are both charming and informative. The very best improvement is the inclusion of MANY more photos of the completed recipes themselves. This makes this a near perfect cookbook as far as charm, information, beautiful photographs and overall usefulness.

My only complaint? I could actually use a few more photos. If photos are the most expensive commodity in publishing and their number must be limited I wish they would have been slightly more careful in their choices. Of course, most Amish recipes (like those for bread) may not need a photo to help the prospective cook visualize the finished result. But other recipes are much more unfamiliar to the average baker. I would have liked more photos of unfamiliar recipes (like "Tears on my Pillow" pie) rather than a photo of a loaf of home baked bread.

That small complaint aside, this is a wonderful book as it stands. I have already purchased two more to give as gifts. It is one I will keep and use often. Thanks Lovina and Kevin!
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