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The Amphibian Paperback – July 1, 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: International Law & Taxation (July 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1589633377
  • ISBN-13: 978-1589633377
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.3 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,367,963 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Alexander Belayev, the first-and very nearly the best-Soviet science fiction writer, was born in 1884 in Smolenak. When a little boy Alexander was full of ideas. One of them was to fly. And he did fly - from the rooftop - until one day he fractured his spine. This was put right, but at the age of 32 he developed bone tuberculosis and was bed-ridden for nearly six years and later for shorter stretches.

His first novel, Professor Dowell's Head, serialized in a popular magazine in 1926, was an immediate success. Since then Belayev wrote fifty-odd novels - many of them as topical as if written today - reaching the one-million copy mark by January 1942 when he died near Leningrad. His best known books are the Amphibian, A Jump into Nothingness and the Island of Dead Ships.

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Yvonne P. Joseph on December 27, 2002
Format: Paperback
"The Amphibian" is such a beautiful book. It is enchanting and absorbing concerning the fascinating, yet sad, life story of Ichthyander the Amphibian. Ichthyander is such a winsome character. He's loveably sweet and cute (and, of course, very handsome!). Plus, he's kind, and very sensitive. You'd want to give him a big hug and say 'Everything will be just fine. We love you just as you are -- gills and all!" It's a pity in the story that he is disliked and misunderstood by the main creep, the villain Don Pedro Zurita, and practically everybody else. One cannot help feel sorry for Ichthyander.
In the section "A Day of Ichthyander's", the reader gets to see how happy he is being in the water, and among the sea creatures. One can easily imagine hearing his laughter of delight when the dolphins arrive to play with him under the warm sun. Ichthyander is really a human merman: the 'Prince of the Sea' --- if there ever was one. The only thing he's missing is a fishtail where his legs are. Not to sound sexist, "The Amphibian" can be considered the male version to "The Little Mermaid". By the way, the book actually gives us the real meaning for Ichthyander's unusual name. They are Greek stem words for "fish" (ichthy-) and "man" (ander or andr). Thus combined, Ichthyander's name is actually 'Fish Man'. He is a 'manfish'; or merman. A human merman, that is.
"The Amphibian" was written about 1928, before the age of snorkeling and scuba diving. Belayev, in describing Ichthyander's undersea ventures, gives some interesting descriptions of undersea life. Had Belayev lived a bit longer, he would have seen his prevision of mankind mastering the ocean be realized. No, people wouldn't be literal amphibians. But people would be using aqualungs to explore underwater.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 22, 2004
Format: Paperback
When I was 10 year old, my brother gave it to me as a gift  on my birthday. I fell in love with Ichthyandar, and his world.
Years later, and halfway around the world, I am still smitten. I scoured local and online bookstores trying to find an English version of the book a few years ago. The one I read as a young girl was translated in Bengali. I finally found it in a little 2nd hand online bookstore in MN.
I highly recommend this SciFi/ fairy tale to anyone with an open mind.
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