Trade in your item
Get a $1.75
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Ancient Tea Horse Road: Travels With the Last of the Himalayan Muleteers Hardcover – June 30, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-0670066117 ISBN-10: 0670066117

6 New from $220.32 15 Used from $89.84
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$220.32 $89.84
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 231 pages
  • Publisher: Renouf Pub Co Ltd (June 30, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670066117
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670066117
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,681,044 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jeff Fuchs is a Canadian award-winning explorer, author and tea purveyor who is based in Zhongdian (Shangri-La) in northwestern Yunnan, China. Fuchs came to prominence when he became the first westerner ever to travel and document the entire length of the Tea Horse Road; a journey that took more than seven months and ranged over 5,000 kilometers through Yunnan, Sichuan, Tibet, Nepal, and India. Fuchs was described by feature writer Bill Roberts in an expedition piece in Outpost Magazine, as a "charmingly volatile mix of Anglo-Hungarian genes", and a "languid hard man with a soft touch". Fuchs was awarded the 2011 Wild China Explorer of the Year for his first western documentation and expedition along a nomadic salt route in southern Qinghai, province (Amdo). As well as acting as a mountain guide in Yunnan province, Fuchs is the co-founder of Jalamteas, which sources rare Puerh teas from southern Yunnan, and is a self-confessed tea addict. He works with Wild China running award-winning journeys along the Tea Horse Road. His most recent expedition was to lead a Canadian team along a never-before documented pilgrim path culminating in the legendary and sacred 4,800 meter Sho'la Pass on the Yunnan-Tibet border. His photos and stories have appeared on three continents in award-winning publications such as UNESCO, Kyoto Journal, TRVL, Outpost, and the South China Post Newspaper amongst others. His photo work of indigenous people rests in private collections around the world. Jeff, who is fluent in Mandarin and Tibetan has worked with schools and universities, giving talks the importance of oral traditions, tea, and mountain cultures. He has authored two papers for UNESCO on Tibetan nomad perceptions of climate change, and indigenous perspectives of ancient tea forests in southwestern Yunnan.

Important Information

Ingredients
Example Ingredients

Directions
Example Directions

More About the Author

Jeff Fuchs is a Canadian award-winning explorer, author, photographer, and tea purveyor who is based in Zhongdian (Shangri-La) in northwestern Yunnan, China. Fuchs came to prominence when he became the first westerner ever to travel and document the entire length of the Tea Horse Road; a journey that took more than seven months and ranged over 5,000 kilometers through Yunnan, Sichuan, Tibet, Nepal, and India.

He serves as a Brand Ambassador or The North Face Asia and is a Scholar in Residence at the prestigious 'East-West Center' in Honolulu.

Fuchs is described described by feature writer Bill Roberts in an expedition piece in Outpost Magazine, as a "charmingly volatile mix of Anglo-Hungarian genes", and a "languid hard man with a soft touch".

Fuchs was awarded the 2011 Wild China Explorer of the Year for his first western documentation and expedition along a nomadic salt route in southern Qinghai, province (Amdo).

His written and photographic work, which has been published on three continents, has repeatedly focused on the themes of oral narratives in the Himalayas, ancient trade routes, and tea culture.

As well as acting as a mountain guide in Yunnan province, Fuchs is the co-founder of JalamTeas, which sources rare Puerh teas from southern Yunnan, and is a self-confessed tea addict. He works with Wild China running trips along the Tea Horse Road and deep into the eastern Himalayas.

Himalayan trade routes and ancient tea culture sum up his two obsessions. He has been featured in articles in the Financial Times and the Huffington Post amongst others.

His photos and stories have appeared on three continents in award-winning publications such as Kyoto Journal, TRVL, Outpost, South China Newspaper, The Earth, Silkroad Foundation, China Heritage Quarterly, amongst others. His photo work of indigenous people rests in private collections around the world. He is fluent in Mandarin and Tibetan.

Jeff has worked with schools and universities, giving talks the importance of oral traditions, tea, and mountain cultures. He is currently at work preparing a paper for UNESCO on Tibetan nomad perceptions of climate change.

http://www.jefffuchs.com/
http://www.tea-and-mountain-journals.com/
http://www.jalamteas.com/

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 8 customer reviews
I downloaded this book in preparation for a trip to Yunnan Province.
Laury S.
As the story unfolded, I realized that this is the kind of story that amazes and educates us about the lives of people in far-off places.
Mary Lou Heiss
I read this book last year after my husband became acquainted with the author.
E. Collins Zinda

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Mary Lou Heiss on March 30, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I read this book in one day on a long flight - no, I should say I inhaled this book because I enjoyed it so much. Indeed, the irony was not lost on me that here I was in various airports, flying about in streamline aircraft while reading about one of oldest and most dangerous Muleteer and Mule tea trading routes in southern China.

I am in the tea business and have been to Yunnan, to some of the tea mountains described in this book. But certainly, very few people, other than the men who made their living plying tea and other trade goods back and forth across the Himalaya to Tibet over this hazardous, unforgiving narrow road of rock and stone, have ventured where this author went.

Jeff Fuchs has done a remarkable job of bringing the reader into the region, the mountains, the remote wind-swept villages and the meager homes of some of the last living Muleteers to record their words and experiences. These are the places that can give even seasoned travelers nightmares.

He weaves a well-constructed story that includes details relevant to a deeper understanding of the history of this place and the lives of those once involved in the Tea Horse Road: some Chinese history, some Chinese tea history, and much about the importance of the Pu-erh tea itself as a trade commodity between Yunnan and Tibet.

As the story unfolded, I realized that this is the kind of story that amazes and educates us about the lives of people in far-off places. I particularly liked and appreciated that he spend quite a bit of time interviewing the old men who were former Muleteers, and that he chronicles how important the tea was then, and still is now, to those who live in remote Himalaya mountain villages.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Ed Hawco on December 11, 2008
Format: Hardcover
"The Ancient Tea Horse Road" is an excellent read for people who love adventure trekking, written memoirs, cultural studies, and tea. Jeff Fuchs, the author, lives in China, so he knows the people and the territory well. The treks he writes about were all organized by himself, and he was the only westerner involved. The other participants where his Chinese and Tibetan friends and acquaintances, and their friends and relatives. Mostly nomads and mountain people.

Jeff is a tea fanatic, and the book is flush with tea lore. It's an excellent primer for people interested in "authentic" Asian tea, as well as for those already well versed.

Probably my favorite thing about the book is the casual, yet impassioned way he writes about the people involved in his treks, and the old mountain people he meets along the way. This book is as much about culture and anthropology as it is about mountains and valleys.

Fuchs is clearly no interloper; not the kind of person who pays a big fee and gets lead around for a while and then flies home. No, he organized and lead the treks, and his concerns were to leave a small footprint, while meeting and interviewing the last of the old timers who used to travel the route as traders. There is a rich cultural history there, and it is dying out quickly. This book is about Fuch's quest to capture some of that history before it is gone, as well as to travel some rough roads and to drink an awful lot of tea.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. Hartzell on July 25, 2014
Format: Hardcover
Fuchs' book is good for its tales of the trail, and the men he meets along it. But it is extraordinarily frustrating for any reader interested in the geography of the Tea Horse Road. The book does not contain a single map. Readers trying to follow along Mr. Fuchs' journey with the aide of outside maps will find themselves frustrated by Mr. Fuchs' decision to use nothing but romanized versions of Tibetan place names. Had he added Chinese pinyin, Chinese characters, or even Tibetan characters in parentheses it would be possible for readers to trace his route on the map, but he refuses to add any of this helpful information. Instead, the romanized Tibetan place names he uses are so seldom used that if you Google them, the only results you'll find are Mr. Fuchs' own website (which also contains no maps). It's almost as if Mr. Fuchs is trying his hardest to prevent any readers from following in his footsteps and retracing the ancient Tea Horse road themselves.

I also think it's disingenuous of Mr. Fuchs to claim that he is the "first Westerner to trek the entire Tea Horse Road". Huge sections of his journey are done by motor vehicle, yet he gives readers little sense that this is the case. The narrative jumps from one place to another, skipping hundreds of kilometers traveled by road. Of course, I understand that parts of the ancient trail are simply not there anymore, and impossible to travel today. Still, it would have been more honest if Mr. Fuchs had made clearly, with maps, just which sections of the trail he did and did not travel by foot.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By David Mason on November 25, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This wonderful book is not so much about tea, but is infused with tea. Part travel dialog, part history, part adventure story and partly a study of a group of friends who undertake to retrace the ancient trade route known as the Tea Horse Road. Before the modern era of easy travel on paved roads goods were moved over high dangerous mountain passes, lonely desserts and rough trails, by men of extraordinary courage and character. They carried not only tea and other goods, but also spread news and knowledge of other lands and peoples who were a world away. The author and his friends in retracing the ancient rout also visit the camps, villages, and old trade centers - and even meet a few of the surviving men who once, not so long ago, practiced the ancient, difficult and backbreaking work of trading on the Tea Horse Road.

Though the book is not specifically about tea, the tea drinker will find much of interest as the adventurers visit the ancient tea gardens of China, visit tea trading centers, and trace the history of puerh tea, and tea as a commodity - and even as a form of currency.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images